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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How would you like to change all your Pilot's fluids in a little over an hour? I just did.

I researched various ways to bleed the brakes (two man method, gravity drain, etc. etc.) Of the various tools, what seemed best to me was the Motive Product Power Bleeder. It's basically a garden chemical pressure sprayer with a gauge and clear tubing at three times the price of a regular garden sprayer. But anyway, it works great.

So this gave me the idea to apply the same pressure fluid delivery to other d&r maintenance areas like the rear differential, the transfer case, and the automatic transmission.

So while I was waiting for the fluids to come up to operating temp, I lowered the spare tire using a reversible drill and a 9/16 socket, vacuum pumped most of the fluids out of the power steering and brake master cylinder reservoirs with a suction oil pump I had lying around for oil changes in the boat. I was careful to leave enough in the ps reservoir so it didn't draw air.

Once up to temp I shut off the engine and I pulled the drain plugs on the oil pan, AT, rear diff, transfer case, radiator and engine block. While everything was draining I changed the oil filter and filled the ps and brake reservoirs with new fluid.

Using inexpensive 1.3 gallon garden chemical sprayers ($12-$15 each), after reinstalling the drain plugs with a torque wrench, I filled each sprayer bottle with the amount of fluid equal to amount I drained out of each area. I calibrated and marked my drain pans so I know immediately how much drains out. Some old Tupperwares we no longer use for food are perfect, especially the smaller ones that you can put under the oil filter to prevent drips on your frame and the ground.

I pumped up all the sprayers a few times and used the locking triggers to let them start filling the various cases. Since I only put what was needed in each pressure sprayer, there was no need to monitor any of the fills. I removed the spray heads from all the sprayer wands to speed up fluid delivery.

While that was going on, I made the rounds of all four corners bleeding and inspecting the brakes. Since the whole brake system is under pressure, no need to have any special bottle or technique to dump the old brake fluid into. I didn't even take off the tires/wheels. Air cannot get into a pressurized system (unless you pump it in by letting the reservoir go dry) so you just remove the dust cap, slip on a clear tube into a drain pan and crack the bleeder open. Once the fluid is clear, shut the bleed, put the cap on and move on.

I closed the radiator and engine block drains and filled with two gallons of 50/50 using a funnel. Used a funnel with the engine oil as well.

After a lot of discussion about putting the car up on four stands, I decided to just do it all on the ground. I did jack up the LR tire to get a little more out of the AT but I doubt I'll do it next time since so little extra came out. If I were using some other method to bleed the brakes I would probably put the car up on stands and remove all four tires/wheels. That takes more time and effort than I spent doing everything else. I more than paid for the power bleeder with the money I got back returning the two extra jack stands I won't need anymore (hopefully).

Probably my imagination but during the test drive the Pilot seemed to shift smoother, ride smoother, got better mileage, stopped better, and no kidding, that forward creep at long red lights I mentioned in another thread is now gone.

Oh, btw, if you try this, get the cheap sprayers with the plastic spray wands. Some fluids are corrosive to some metals. The small spray wand tubes are 5/16" O.D. and will fit perfectly and snugly in the ATF dipstick tube. The plastic tube will also "grab" on the gear teeth right inside the differential fill port so it won't fall out there either.

I used a plastic carpet protector from the office to protect the brick pavers in the driveway from any dripped oil spots.

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The Motiv is available with any of a large assortment of reservoir caps with hose fittings. Find the one that fits your master cylinder, and you are on your way.

If you go the garden sprayer route as I did (before the Motive was on the market) , you'll need to fabricate your own master cylinder reservoir cap adapter. I ended up using a factory cap, and fitting a quick-disconnect nipple through the top, with large (fender) washers and some RTV to seal the fitting in the cap. Make sure the seal between the cap and reservoir is perfect, else you'll have brake fluid chewing up the paint where it dribbles out. I cover everything underneath and out over the fender with a plastic trash bag just in case. Pressurize slowly while you check for leaks.
 

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I like the power bleeder. I'll have to check that out.
I have OCD when it comes to removing old fluid. I'll let my ATF drip for an hour or two, to remove it all. Especially when I was dealing with the black DW-1 from the torque converter clutch lock debacle. The higher the faster it drains with a left rear jack.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Motiv is available with any of a large assortment of reservoir caps with hose fittings. Find the one that fits your master cylinder, and you are on your way.

If you go the garden sprayer route as I did (before the Motive was on the market) , you'll need to fabricate your own master cylinder reservoir cap adapter. I ended up using a factory cap, and fitting a quick-disconnect nipple through the top, with large (fender) washers and some RTV to seal the fitting in the cap. Make sure the seal between the cap and reservoir is perfect, else you'll have brake fluid chewing up the paint where it dribbles out. I cover everything underneath and out over the fender with a plastic trash bag just in case. Pressurize slowly while you check for leaks.
Yeah, as you can see from my pic, I do drape clear plastic over the fender to protect the paint although I did pressure test everything before putting fluid in the bottle. Motive recommends pumping to 5psi on their gauge, but I got impatient and pumped it up to 10psi and that did speed things up considerably. I watched the master cylinder's plastic reservoir as I was pumping and it didn't bulge or anything and the sealed cap showed no signs of moving or popping off. I figure the rest of the brake system sees a lot higher pressures during braking so, I went for it and just said a prayer before the test drive... the Pilot and I are still alive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like the power bleeder. I'll have to check that out.
I have OCD when it comes to removing old fluid. I'll let my ATF drip for an hour or two, to remove it all. Especially when I was dealing with the black DW-1 from the torque converter clutch lock debacle. The higher the faster it drains with a left rear jack.
View attachment 142968
I let the drained fluids sit in the drain pans overnight before pouring them into the bottles the new fluid came it so the recycler knows what he's getting. They are tupperware bins with water proof covers so nothing gets in as they sit outside overnight. When I drain the pans I do so very slowly and watch for any solids that may have settled to the bottom. So far if anything is there, it's too small to see or was caught by the drain plug magnet.

However, I did do the raise LR tire as you suggested this time.
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I messed up and didn't have the square drive on the breaker bar all the way in the transmission drain plug so it partially stripped the square hole.
Luckily there was enough left to get the plug out. My kind wife ran out and got me a new plug. I was surprised that the new plug has a much stronger magnet than the OEM plug. I hope it doesn't suck a gear outta the transmission!

 

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I let the drained fluids sit in the drain pans overnight before pouring them into the bottles the new fluid came it so the recycler knows what he's getting. They are tupperware bins with water proof covers so nothing gets in as they sit outside overnight. When I drain the pans I do so very slowly and watch for any solids that may have settled to the bottom. So far if anything is there, it's too small to see or was caught by the drain plug magnet.

However, I did do the raise LR tire as you suggested this time.
View attachment 142969

I messed up and didn't have the square drive on the breaker bar all the way in the transmission drain plug so it partially stripped the square hole.
Luckily there was enough left to get the plug out. My kind wife ran out and got me a new plug. I was surprised that the new plug has a much stronger magnet than the OEM plug. I hope it doesn't suck a gear outta the transmission!

I like the Tupperware measuring lines. Sometimes you just want to know exactly how much you drain out.
 

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Lots of good ideas. Thanks!

I've been using a MityVac to pull oil out through the dipstick port for several years now. Similar to this idea, just on a 5-quart scale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lots of good ideas. Thanks!

I've been using a MityVac to pull oil out through the dipstick port for several years now. Similar to this idea, just on a 5-quart scale.
You're welcome, my pleasure.
I drain both the transmission and engine oil through the drain plugs. They're right next to each other so as long as I'm on my back ....

I only vacuum out the power steering reservoir and brake master cylinder reservoir since it is so little and only takes a second. Plus it's neater. I always seem to drip a little fluid out of the turkey basters in the wrong place for some reason.

The pressure bottles I use for FILLING the fluids into the automatic transmission, differential and transfer case. The wand trigger has a lock feature so I don't even have to hold the trigger. I start the fill and go do something else. i only put the amount needed so it stops automatically when it runs out. On the diff and transfer boxes I put a little extra in so it comes out the fill port which is the level check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I like the Tupperware measuring lines. Sometimes you just want to know exactly how much you drain out.
Yes, it's good to know how much comes out. But I still like to double check with the dipstick if it has one. One the others like the differential and transfer case, I just add a little extra so it comes out the fill port.

I'm still at a loss for a good way to handle the left over odd amount between what is used and what isn't in Honda's, and other's, inconvenient packaging, especially the VTM4 where about a 1/4 of the container is left over. I like to use the original packaging to deliver the drained stuff to the recycler and I don't want odd ends of new red VTM4 that looks like VML in generic bottles.
 

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