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2013 Honda Pilot EX-L, 4WD, VCMuzzler II
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I love this forum!!

I have a 2013 Pilot EX-L (4WD), and we just hit 100,000 miles. It's recommended that I change the timing belt at this time. I've also seen that it's recommended to have something done to the valves (I can't remember the correct term). I work at a university, and the good ol' coronavirus has my job status in limbo for this fall. So I'm trying to sit on as much moolah as possible. Which one of the two needs to be done now, and which one can wait 6-8 mos? I'd like to get both done now, but I think my local Honda dealership quoted me $2700 for both (almost $1000 for the timing belt, around $1700 for the valves). That's more than I want to let go of until I see where I'm at job-wise. Any insights are appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Timing belt for sure.

Valve adjustment is debated as to the need, it doesn't hurt to get it done when you are able to save up for it.
 
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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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Timing belt is usually 105,000 miles or 7 years. That includes new belt, tensioner, seals, and water pump. Good time to change the serpentine belt and tensioner as well. Valves should be checked and adjusted if needed.

IMO the timing belt price is reasonable if it includes what I have listed. The valve adjustment quote is way out of line. Valve adjustment usually runs around $500, not $1500. You don't state where you live, but I would look around at other Honda dealers or a good independent shop that services Hondas and get a quote from them. Make sure they use either OEM Honda parts (a little more expensive) or Asin timing belt kit (a little cheaper but good parts).
 

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Timing belt should be done. Valve adjustment can wait until things are a bit more stable. My mechanic usually inspects/adjusts valves at the second timing belt change.
 

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There are some related articles that include valve adjustment as part of a sluggishness solution. Other major part is replacement of the EGR valve. Adjusting the valves definitely falls into DIY territory with not many tools, and some patience. I've read the FSM procedure and it looks like getting the covers off might be the biggest labor part. After that, you get to rotate the engine 120º at a time to see a marker, and adjust the clearances between the rocker and cam follower with a box wrench, screwdriver, and feeler gauges.

As part of the timing belt service, you'll have the cam belt covers off already, you'll have the ratchet on the crank bolt socket to rotate the engine. Do it with the plugs out to make turning the crank easier. Everything will be cold too. Just seems like the perfect time to adjust the valves. Can't see a reason to miss that opportunity. I agree that the $1500 number is a mistake. Suggest to the service seller that an extra zero was accidentally added to that line item, when it's done as part of the timing belt, rollers tensioners water pump spark plugs project. If it takes the tech an hour at that point, the buck-fifty is realistic. In my opinion anyway. Good idea to shop around some for the whole project at once.

In my deep dark past, I bought a new Honda motorcycle that had valve adjustment listed as part of an early service. I added some "qc paint marks" with clear nail polish on the adjustment caps, the clutch linkage adjustment, the oil drain plug and the gearbox oil plug, chain adjustment plug. Service guy and I had a "discussion" when I picked it up and none of the marks had been disturbed. I took it to a better dealer after that. How does this mix into the Pilot discussion? There's no way to tell of the tech actually makes the adjustment. We can add that little telltale to see if the cam covers were removed, perhaps adding a little comfort. From that point on, I schooled myself on stuff I needed to do to keep the toys alive with minimum dealer participation.

Our Pilot has seen the dealer for TSB and recall items only. K insists on dealer service for her 4Runner, but every service they do is done again at half of their service interval. Plus a lot of stuff gets done that they forget to list. Several times the dealer listed services I'd already done, long-term things like ATF, steering, coolant, transfer case and differential fluid, plus brake fluid flushes. I have them read from the logbook and enter the services with a note that they were customer-performed. The first dealer was good about that. The local folks where we are now are not nearly as easy to work with. No local competition as we had in SoCal.
 
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