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When I was in my early 20s, I had a tire shop plug a 10 ply $200 tire. He broke the cord. 10 miles later I had a blowout. And not to far in the distant past, I had an employee do the samething.
Well, that had to have sucked. Always hard to see an expensive tire go for a crap due to an improper repair.
Live and learn I suppose.
By any chance would it have been a LT 225/75R16 Michelin LTX
 

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Well, that had to have sucked. Always hard to see an expensive tire go for a crap due to an improper repair.
Live and learn I suppose.
By any chance would it have been a LT 225/75R16 Michelin LTX
To long ago. It was on a box van with duel wheels. Thankfully it was empty, it was on the back and bought a new tire the next morning after going home. I had one upset supervisor.
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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See post #54 above.
I already had. Nowhere does it mention the recommendation that they perform a hot patch. Nor do they mention that the recommended method of patching a tire is both a plug and a patch.

There are cold patches and hot patches. A properly applied hot patch will be adhered to the tire with adhesives and then melded into the inner tire structure with the application of heat, whereas a cold patch will just be put on with adhesives. A proper plug patch will most often be a one piece unit that must be applied to an unmounted tire from the inside after proper inspection and preparation. A radial patch must be used on a radial tire, the vast majority of the automotive tires on the road today being radial.


The Rubber Manufacturers Association criteria for the proper repair of a tire.
  • Repairs are limited to the tread area only.
  • Puncture injury cannot be greater than 1/4 inch (6mm) in diameter.
  • Repairs must be performed by removing the tire from the wheel in order to perform a complete inspection to assess all damage that may be present.
  • Repairs may NOT overlap.
  • A rubber stem or plug, must be applied to fill the puncture injury and a patch must be applied to seal the inner liner. A common repair unit is a one-piece unit with a stem and a patch portion. A Plug by itself is an unacceptable tire repair.
An RMA study has shown that 88% of all repaired tires are done so improperly. No wonder there is so much confusion and misinformation regarding repaired. tires.
 

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I already had. Nowhere does it mention the recommendation that they perform a hot patch. Nor do they mention that the recommended method of patching a tire is both a plug and a patch.

There are cold patches and hot patches. A properly applied hot patch will be adhered to the tire with adhesives and then melded into the inner tire structure with the application of heat, whereas a cold patch will just be put on with adhesives. A proper plug patch will most often be a one piece unit that must be applied to an unmounted tire from the inside after proper inspection and preparation. A radial patch must be used on a radial tire, the vast majority of the automotive tires on the road today being radial.


The Rubber Manufacturers Association criteria for the proper repair of a tire.
  • Repairs are limited to the tread area only.
  • Puncture injury cannot be greater than 1/4 inch (6mm) in diameter.
  • Repairs must be performed by removing the tire from the wheel in order to perform a complete inspection to assess all damage that may be present.
  • Repairs may NOT overlap.
  • A rubber stem or plug, must be applied to fill the puncture injury and a patch must be applied to seal the inner liner. A common repair unit is a one-piece unit with a stem and a patch portion. A Plug by itself is an unacceptable tire repair.
An RMA study has shown that 88% of all repaired tires are done so improperly. No wonder there is so much confusion and misinformation regarding repaired. tires.
You sound like you were involved in the industry.
All good points you stated. As you brought up split wheels, you must have done commercial tires as well.
Glad they dont have 16.5 tires any more. Saw a few people mount 16.5 on a 16 wheel, did not work out well, as I am sure you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
So the other day I watched the wife drive off, and it looked like the 3rd brake light wasn't working. After completing the oil & ATF change, as the wife was not available, used a couple small bags of cat litter (bought to help cleanup any fluid spills) to depress the brake and confirmed it is indeed not lighting up. I checked the Owners Manual for the bulb type, and found it isn't really helpful. If I'm to believe the auto-parts stores, the high mount brake light uses "921"? Does anyone have experience using LED's in this position? If so what brand & source would you recommend? Ideally I want something brighter than stock, not (especially) concerned about power efficiency, and since it's LED has the benefit of getting to full brightness quicker. Or should I just slap a good ol' cheap halogen in it? (by far the most economical, and not like that bulb is really that difficult/time consuming to replace).
 

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So the other day I watched the wife drive off, and it looked like the 3rd brake light wasn't working. After completing the oil & ATF change, as the wife was not available, used a couple small bags of cat litter (bought to help cleanup any fluid spills) to depress the brake and confirmed it is indeed not lighting up. I checked the Owners Manual for the bulb type, and found it isn't really helpful. If I'm to believe the auto-parts stores, the high mount brake light uses "921"? Does anyone have experience using LED's in this position? If so what brand & source would you recommend? Ideally I want something brighter than stock, not (especially) concerned about power efficiency, and since it's LED has the benefit of getting to full brightness quicker. Or should I just slap a good ol' cheap halogen in it? (by far the most economical, and not like that bulb is really that difficult/time consuming to replace).
I'd just put the same bulb back in it. It's just a brake light.
 

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It just burns out more frequently than other bulbs, it seems, but yeah, just put the same one back in. Be careful with those little red triangular screw covers, though. Dealer only item, and of course there's an obscene markup.


I'd just add to use a little rag over the pick (or flathead screwdriver) as Honda recommends, to reduce the risk of breaking the little tab, without which the two little triangular red plastic covers won't snap into place anymore and you'll probably lose them while driving. They are annoying and overpriced to replace, so best to avoid the hassle.

On my first change, I lost one and had to fork over something like six bucks plus taxes for that tiny bit of red plastic.
138150




If it's more visibilty you want, for tailgaters and the like, do what I did.

Flashing Blinking 3rd Brake Light

 

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I'd rather take my chances with law enforcement officers than with dangerous tailgaters.

I've already been totaled in one which sent my wife to the hospital because of a cellphone lady tailgater, so I'm not looking forward to my next "carlonoscopy."

Pilot just totaled



 

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Discussion Starter #70
Welp, upon checking under the Pilot this morning, there was a small stain from where it's leaking slowly from the oil pan drain plug area. I noticed there was some blue sealant on the bottom of the drain plug area when removing the drain bolt, and also when I was installing, the washer didn't seem the right size. Upon reviewing the Majestic Honda website again for the part, they had the schematic linked to the wrong part, so I bought several 18MM washers instead of 14MM. When installing the improperly sized one, I did line it up, the outside diameter seemed right, but the inside diameter was too loose. So it looks like I'll be venturing to the nearest dealership and picking up a couple of those drain washers, and will be having to drain the oil again, replace said washer, then putting the drained oil (with maybe only 100 miles on it) back in through the top. If that doesn't fix the slow drip, then I'll apply some Permatex Grey in the manner of the previous one (along the bottom edge).

So the incorrect part I got was: 90401-P8A-A00
While the correct (washer) part should be: 94109-14000
Oil Drain Plug part number is: 90009-R70-A00
 

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So it looks like I'll be venturing to the nearest dealership and picking up a couple of those drain washers, and will be having to drain the oil again, replace said washer, then putting the drained oil (with maybe only 100 miles on it) back in through the top. If that doesn't fix the slow drip, then I'll apply some Permatex Grey in the manner of the previous one (along the bottom edge).
Pick up the correct crush washers for the oil pan and use new oil and recycle the old oil. With the correct crush washer there should be no need for permatex
 

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If you have a helper, and you’re quick, you might be able to get by with having to replace only a quart of oil. Just do this when the engine is cold as you’ll have your finger in the drain hole as someone swaps crush washers on the drain plug.
 
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Discussion Starter #73 (Edited)
Pick up the correct crush washers for the oil pan and use new oil and recycle the old oil. With the correct crush washer there should be no need for permatex
Recycle 100 mile old oil? That's just pissing money down the drain (if I let all 4-5 quarts of oil drain out). In regards to the permatex, that would only be if it doesn't seal with the correct washer, because someone before me put something of that nature on the bottom of the plug/pan.

If you have a helper, and you’re quick, you might be able to get by with having to replace only a quart of oil. Just do this when the engine is cold as you’ll have your finger in the drain hole as someone swaps crush washers on the drain plug.
Thought crossed my mind, figure I'll just buy a brand new drain plug with the proper size crush washers, which if I lose a quart of oil, won't be that bad to top-off.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
Ran to the Honda Dealership and picked up a new drain plug, and 4 crush washers (since they are the same part number for my 09 Fit as well). Goal is to use each one twice (flip between changes), and then replace, but actually haven't gotten a chance to switch out the drain plug yet, as the wife's job will have worked her 40 hours in the last 3 days. Goal is to let the vehicle cool overnight, and tackle that swap first thing Sunday morning.

On another note, Prior to the oil/transmission fluid change, one of the gas mileage readings came back as 14.8mpg, and found out she was "rushing" to get everywhere, so after that bottle of fuel injector cleaner, and oil/trans fluid change, and telling her the biggest improvement one can make for MPG is to change the nut behind the wheel, reports her MPG has gone up to 18.55mpg for 50/50 highway/city driving, with minimal/no AC. So overall, that's a 20% improvement in MPG. Now she leaves for work early, and 🎶 keeps the gas peddle leaned back taking her time🎶. I also advised her about how Drive-By-Wire throttle control is different than how her old 2000 Civic (and my 91 Accord) works, so she is also dealing with that learning curve (which I'm used to from my 09 Fit Sport (manual) I bought with 3 miles on it). E.g. the bulk of (background) knowledge bestowed in this video: The Big Problem With Modern Manual Transmissions - Rev Hang
 

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Ran to the Honda Dealership and picked up a new drain plug, and 4 crush washers (since they are the same part number for my 09 Fit as well). Goal is to use each one twice (flip between changes)
Done the same thing for crush washers in good shape and never had an issue. Bought a bag of twenty off Amazon < $8 to keep on hand. On a neighbor's car it was surprising to see that some quick oil change shops will reuse crush washers crushed beyond the original shape.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Oh something else I wanted to mention but forgot. The drain plug that is on the Pilot right now uses a 16MM socket, where-as the replacement uses a 17MM. Wouldn't be the first time a mechanic has gotten parts mixed up between different cars in their shop... (e.g. I've come home with a different radiator cap than what I've gone in with).
 

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On another note, Prior to the oil/transmission fluid change, one of the gas mileage readings came back as 14.8mpg, and found out she was "rushing" to get everywhere, so after that bottle of fuel injector cleaner, and oil/trans fluid change, and telling her the biggest improvement one can make for MPG is to change the nut behind the wheel, reports her MPG has gone up to 18.55mpg for 50/50 highway/city driving, with minimal/no AC. So overall, that's a 20% improvement in MPG. Now she leaves for work early, and 🎶 keeps the gas peddle leaned back taking her time🎶.
Here's a list of things for the wife to try in the quest for better fuel economy:
Hypermiling: Quest for Ultimate Fuel Economy | Edmunds
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Here's a list of things for the wife to try in the quest for better fuel economy:
Hypermiling: Quest for Ultimate Fuel Economy | Edmunds
Thanks for the link, I've been a part of ecomodder.com for some time, which goes into extreme depths on the subject. I already advised her to "drive like you have no brakes" (TLDR don't accelerate up to a stop sign/light), and to only try and use the AC on the highway as it is more efficient when than the windows open, and likewise it's better to have the window open at lower speeds (e.g. 45mph or less). One other thing (I hope she is doing), is when we get fast food, that she uses the "carry-out" (order via the app/website) option (where they carry it out to you) instead of idling in the drive-thru.
 
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