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Guess you've been out of town since 1995, when they voted "no" for the second time.
 

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Guess you've been out of town since 1995, when they voted "no" for the second time.
Damn i been away that long ... LOL ..oh well all is good !
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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Well if truth be told, Quebec is it's own country, it may be part of Canada, but it's still its own country. Or as it should be stated.

Eh bien, à vrai dire, le Québec est son propre pays, il fait peut-être partie du Canada, mais c'est toujours son propre pays.

😆
 

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Certainement une société distincte. :)
138594


But I believe we're well into topic drift. OP, let us know how that rear blower motor fix goes. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
OP, Congrats on your new car. I myself just purchased an 2008 Pilot EX-L with 230000km,s (143000 miles)
Bought as-is from my manager. For the safety it needed windshield, lube caliper sliders, and replace the snows with all season. Fantastic car, for my wife she loves it. Paid $2500.00 and all in for the safety including tires $950.
So for $3450.00 I think I did pretty well. Timing belt done last year. Just have to fix the rear blower.
Hope it gives me a couple years good service.
Thank you PHM, welcome to the Piloteer's Family 🍻. Sounds like you scored a nice deal, I presume that's in Canadian, so here that would be $1864.08 before repairs, title, + taxes, etc. Probably helps some that they are made in Canada as well, so don't have to pay import fee's.

On the topic of the Wife's Pilot, on Wednesday I made an attempt to do an ATF Drain & Fill, and an Oil change without jacking the vehicle up (I've never done my own fluid changes, even though on previous vehicles I've replaced a rear differential, a driveshaft (u-joint broke, and was pressed in), replaced fenders/doors, window regulators, so I'm not afraid to wrench on things), quickly learned I can't get enough torque with the 4-5" socket wrench I have that fit in the space, so today used the Tow Hook to lift the front end so I could fit my Breaker Bar, and managed to break it free. 💪



The fluid that came out still had a nice red tint to it (unknown when it was changed last).


As expected the drain plug was covered in shavings:


I also collected a sample mid-stream that I plan on sending to Blackstone Labs:


Interesting enough, I put the drain plug back in very loosely for 3-4 minutes while I searched around for a new crush washer, and when I pulled the plug back out, had grabbed another chunk of shavings, so cleaned it off (again), and then put the plug back, torqued to German Spec (in German Accent), aka "Good-N-Tight" :p.


So "tip", when doing a drain and fill, put the plug back in temporarily after everything's drained out, and you can remove some shavings that may not have come out when you first pulled the plug.

I then filled it up with 3 quarts of Honda DW-1 ATF to start, as the front was jacked up and can't get a good reading.

So I then proceeded to perform an oil change, draining the Unknown Brand Synthetic, with unknown mileage (assuming maintenance minder interval), and came out black, didn't smell like it was burned, but (to me) smelled a little like fuel, but I don't exactly have a tuned nose for that sorta thing, and doesn't seem any different than any other used oil I've smelled. I also grabbed a sample mid-stream while draining. Put the drain plug back in, then pulled the STP Oil Filter off, and replaced it with a K&N.


I then proceeded to add around 4 quarts of Royal Purple 5w20, and then lowered the vehicle back down to semi-level ground so I could take an accurate reading. Ended up putting another full quart of Honda DW-1 ATF, which brought the fluid level (while cold) to just barely above the bottom hole. I then added about another half quart of Royal Purple, which brought the oil level up to about midway in the gauge. I then sealed everything back up, paid quick respect to the "gods", and started her up. Let it idle there for about 5 minutes while checking for leaks, checked all the fluid's levels, then backed it out into the cul-de-sac where the ground is level, shut it off, and re-checked the levels. Proceeded to add another .25 quarts of ATF, and another .25 quarts of Oil, which brought both levels to the maximum level.

So overall, took about 4.25 quarts of ATF, and 4.75ish quarts of oil by only lifting the front end.

I then took it to the local Car Pressure Washer, and once done, took it on the highway to "dry" it, and it had no problem getting up to 100mph, and probably only had the throttle at 25-30%. Even the wife admits it creeps on her, and before she knows it she is going 85mph on the highway, and seems to be extremely healthy and happy (thank you previous owner, thank you 🤘). I also added a bottle of Royal Purple's Max-Clean Fuel System Cleaner to the tank of gas just prior to this (and was run down to right before low fuel light kicks on - after about 10 miles of driving it and doing everything).

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words, well here is what the underside of this Beast looks like with 130.3k on the clock (and why I happily paid the amount I did for this vehicle):










Something I didn't notice previously, it appears the lower control arm bushings should be serviced soon. I wonder if that is the reason I feel some shuddering while doing medium braking. Any particular brand of bushings you guys recommend?

I'm thinking I'll rent a bushing removal tool and possibly do them myself. Only other tool I don't have is an impact gun. Figure if I do it myself, the money saved by not paying a mechanic to do it, could be used to cover the cost of the impact gun, which I'm sure will be extremely helpful with other repairs / service down the line. Been eyeballing the Milwaukee M18 Fuel. 🤤
 

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Got dinged too when I got my '06 in 2015. Quebec taxes you on book value for an up to 10-year-old vehicle. After 10 years, though, you can tell them whatever you want for the selling price and they'll accept it.
Thank you PHM, welcome to the Piloteer's Family 🍻. Sounds like you scored a nice deal, I presume that's in Canadian, so here that would be $1864.08 before repairs, title, + taxes, etc.

On the topic of the Wife's Pilot, on Wednesday I made an attempt to do an ATF Drain & Fill, and an Oil change without jacking the vehicle up, quickly learned I can't get enough torque with the 4-5" socket wrench I have that fit in the space, so today used the Tow Hook to lift the front end so I could fit my Breaker Bar, and managed to break it free. 💪



The fluid that came out still had a nice red tint to it (unknown when it was changed last).


As expected the drain plug was covered in shavings:


I also collected a sample mid-stream that I plan on sending to Blackstone Labs:


Interesting enough, I put the drain plug back in very loosely for 3-4 minutes while I searched around for a new crush washer, and when I pulled the plug back out, had grabbed another chunk of shavings, so cleaned it off (again), and then put the plug back, torqued to German Spec (in German Accent), aka "Good-N-Tight" :p.


So "tip", when doing a drain and fill, put the plug back in temporarily after everything's drained out, and you can remove some shavings that may not have come out when you first pulled the plug.

I then filled it up with 3 quarts of Honda DW-1 ATF to start, as the front was jacked up and can't get a good reading.

So I then proceeded to perform an oil change, draining the Unknown Brand Synthetic, with unknown mileage (assuming maintenance minder interval), and came out black, didn't smell like it was burned, but (to me) smelled a little like fuel, but I don't exactly have a tuned nose for that sorta thing, and doesn't seem any different than any other used oil I've smelled. I also grabbed a sample mid-stream while draining. Put the drain plug back in, then pulled the STP Oil Filter off, and replaced it with a K&N.


I then proceeded to add around 4 quarts of Royal Purple 5w20, and then lowered the vehicle back down to semi-level ground so I could take an accurate reading. Ended up putting another full quart of Honda DW-1 ATF, which brought the fluid level (while cold) to just barely above the bottom hole. I then added about another half quart of Royal Purple, which brought the oil level up to about midway in the gauge. I then sealed everything back up, paid quick respect to the "gods", and started her up. Let it idle there for about 5 minutes while checking for leaks, checked all the fluid's levels, then backed it out into the cul-de-sac where the ground is level, shut it off, and re-checked the levels. Proceeded to add another .25 quarts of ATF, and another .25 quarts of Oil, which brought both levels to the maximum level.

So overall, took about 4.25 quarts of ATF, and 4.75ish quarts of oil by only lifting the front end.

I then took it to the local Car Pressure Washer, and once done, took it on the highway to "dry" it, and it had no problem getting up to 100mph, and probably only had the throttle at 25-30%. Even the wife admits it creeps on her, and before she knows it she is going 85mph on the highway, and seems to be extremely healthy and happy (thank you previous owner, thank you 🤘). I also added a bottle of Royal Purple's Max-Clean Fuel System Cleaner to the tank of gas just prior to this (and was run down to right before low fuel light kicks on - after about 10 miles of driving it and doing everything).

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words, well here is what the underside of this Beast looks like with 130.3k on the clock (and why I happily paid the amount I did for this vehicle):










Something I didn't notice previously, it appears the lower control arm bushings should be serviced soon. I wonder if that is the reason I feel some shuddering while doing medium braking. Any particular brand of bushings you guys recommend?

I'm thinking I'll rent a bushing removal tool and possibly do them myself. Only other tool I don't have is an impact gun. Figure if I do it myself, the money saved by not paying a mechanic to do it, could be used to cover the cost of the impact gun, which I'm sure will be extremely helpful with other repairs / service down the line. Been eyeballing the Milwaukee M18 Fuel. 🤤
You are keeping busy. Good on you for looking after all the important details. I have to text my manager in the morning to see when he last did the tranny and dif. He did an oil change a couple weeks before we got it.
 

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Something I didn't notice previously, it appears the lower control arm bushings should be serviced soon. I wonder if that is the reason I feel some shuddering while doing medium braking. Any particular brand of bushings you guys recommend?
Get the whole LCAs and be done with it. Easier, too. Moog or Mevotech or Beck/Arnley. Proforged is more expensive but some people really like them. I've got Moog, personally.



Nice list of maintenance items done and nice pics.(y)


Now, about that wholly inadequate donut spare...
 

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Only other tool I don't have is an impact gun. Figure if I do it myself, the money saved by not paying a mechanic to do it, could be used to cover the cost of the impact gun, which I'm sure will be extremely helpful with other repairs / service down the line. Been eyeballing the Milwaukee M18 Fuel
I've invested in the M12+M18 line and they have been awesome. The M18 2767 impact wrench is powerful but bulky and there are smaller versions. The M12 impact drivers and ratchet are strong and convenient for smaller jobs.
 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
Get the whole LCAs and be done with it. Easier, too. Moog or Mevotech or Beck/Arnley. Proforged is more expensive but some people really like them. I've got Moog, personally.

Thanks for the link, I'd probably be happy with the Moog or Mevotech if I went that route. Are pressing out bushings that much of a PITA? I was simply thinking I could rent a bushing replacement tool, and just pay for the new compliance bushings, through RockAuto that's like $20 (before shipping). OEM would be about $35 for two of the compliance bushings.
This video makes it look super easy, and funny enough (first video I clicked/found) it's on a Pilot as well, and the exact bushings in question :
EDIT: Upon even closer inspection, it looks like the "fronts" are also looking aged. Makes sense since it spent most of its life on the other (desert) side of the mountains. So yeah, I now see why you say just get the whole LCA assembly. 😄

Nice list of maintenance items done and nice pics.(y)
Thank you, trying to get it baselined, next on the list is to replace the PCV valve, and/or flush the power steering, should be a 5 minute job based upon my research, and I'm happy to hear you enjoy the pictures :)

Now, about that wholly inadequate donut spare...
That would be useful when the Zombie Apocalypse happens! I'll see about getting a spare wheel from a junkyard when I go to pull a few items next, until then I (and anyone else who buys a used car should have) roadside assistance through my car insurance for stupid cheap, something like maybe $7/year at most, and I've already used it once for the alternator incident, so paid for itself several times over. Thus if the wife does get a flat, can have them throw the spare on and/or tow it to the nearest tire shop for her.

I've invested in the M12+M18 line and they have been awesome. The M18 2767 impact wrench is powerful but bulky and there are smaller versions. The M12 impact drivers and ratchet are strong and convenient for smaller jobs.
Glad to hear the positive feedback. I was thinking of the M18 1/2", that way I'm not tempted to use my 3/8" socket sets that I'm pretty sure aren't impact rated. Can the M12 bust lug-nuts / rusted exhaust, and other generally considered tough to remove bolts?
 

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That would be useful when the Zombie Apocalypse happens! I'll see about getting a spare wheel from a junkyard when I go to pull a few items next, until then I (and anyone else who buys a used car should have) roadside assistance through my car insurance for stupid cheap, something like maybe $7/year at most, and I've already used it once for the alternator incident, so paid for itself several times over. Thus if the wife does get a flat, can have them throw the spare on and/or tow it to the nearest tire shop for her.
I've got roadside assistance, too, and I've used it occasionally, but there have been a few times (e.g., out of cellphone range) that it felt good knowing I had a good, full size spare (it fits) back there like the Good Lord originally intended. :)
 

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Get the whole LCAs and be done with it. Easier, too. Moog or Mevotech or Beck/Arnley. Proforged is more expensive but some people really like them. I've got Moog, personally.



Nice list of maintenance items done and nice pics.(y)


Now, about that wholly inadequate donut spare...
Never put much thought about the donut spare. I carry a plug kit along with my booster pack, which has built in compressor. So not too worried about that.
 

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I've got roadside assistance, too, and I've used it occasionally, but there have been a few times (e.g., out of cellphone range) that it felt good knowing I had a good, full size spare (it fits) back there like the Good Lord originally intended. :)
The good lord intended for you not to get in a situation where you needed the spare, otherwise the vehicle would come with a full size spare to begin with. It is he who strays from the path of righteousness that falls to the evil of the puncture. Book of Dunlop 6:13 :LOL:
 

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I was thinking of the M18 1/2", that way I'm not tempted to use my 3/8" socket sets that I'm pretty sure aren't impact rated. Can the M12 bust lug-nuts / rusted exhaust, and other generally considered tough to remove bolts?
Properly torqued lug nuts can become difficult to remove over time. M12 are powerful for the compact size but are best used for smaller fasteners. For tough nuts use the big M18 or breaker bars. For best results pick up some impact rated metric sockets.
 

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Never put much thought about the donut spare. I carry a plug kit along with my booster pack, which has built in compressor. So not too worried about that.
It just amazed me how some give their opinions on how to do things that are just down right unsafe. Put the donut on is the safe option and cramming that plug into your tire can destroy it if you break cords. Hopefully others are not encouraged to plug their tires by someone who claims to be experienced.
 
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It just amazed me how some give their opinions on how to do things that are just down right unsafe. Put the donut on is the safe option and cramming that plug into your tire can destroy it if you break cords. Hopefully others are not encouraged to plug their tires by someone who claims to be experienced.
Well yes you should always demount the tire and check for damage, and do a proper repair.
On the side of the road in an emergency situation, this will get me home.
Just a note, a proper repair involves in laymen term a plug/patch. Their is a special cutting bit (like a drill bit)
you pull the nail ream the hole, insert plug, the special cutting bit makes sure the steel cords are not damaged.
Yes I carry this in my cordless drill, so I am not just Ramming a plug in it, I am actually doing the first step of
a proper repair. Then when I arrive home I will demount tire ( I own a tire machine and balancer, so I do at home)
Check for damage ( I can tell if it has been run flat or not before demounting, just from experiance)
Then I will proceed with applying a patch, then balance it and install.
I never told anyone to plug their tires, I just said that is what I do.
 

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It just amazed me how some give their opinions on how to do things that are just down right unsafe. Put the donut on is the safe option and cramming that plug into your tire can destroy it if you break cords. Hopefully others are not encouraged to plug their tires by someone who claims to be experienced.
I read the article that you provided, that shop is doing improper tire repairs. They only patch the tire.
You need to fill the injury in the tread also, if you do not it lets water into the injury, which in the long term causes the steel belts to rust, and in time seperation.
So if you do get a tire repaired, get them to use either the one piece, or two piece plug/patch.
 

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It just amazed me how some give their opinions on how to do things that are just down right unsafe. Put the donut on is the safe option and cramming that plug into your tire can destroy it if you break cords. Hopefully others are not encouraged to plug their tires by someone who claims to be experienced.
That's good information on the downsides of plugs+tires but as a poor college kid I've plugged many tires without any issues to report. I remember upwards of 5-6 plugs per tire LOL. Liability conscious companies like Costco who won't install non-spec tires will repair tires for members with interior patch/plug and has not cautioned me to keep speeds <70mph
 

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All of this discussion and not one person has said anything about the NHSTA stating that the proper repair for a punctured tire requires a plug for the hole and patch for the area inside the tire that surrounds the puncture hole.

When I was young, both pre radials and post radials we always hot patched a hole in the tread area. If the hole was big enough we would plug it then hot patch it. Small car tires, PU truck tires, semi truck tires (i hated split rim wheels) as well as tractor, combine, and other farm machinery tires. I have never seen a properly hot patched tire have an issue due to the patch.

With radial plugs that melt and bond to the rubber at road speed covered with a hot patch on the inside of the tire one should never have to worry about having a patch on the tire.
 

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It just amazed me how some give their opinions on how to do things that are just down right unsafe. Put the donut on is the safe option and cramming that plug into your tire can destroy it if you break cords. Hopefully others are not encouraged to plug their tires by someone who claims to be experienced.
When I was in my early 20s, I had a tire shop plug a 10 ply $200 tire. He broke the cord. 10 miles later I had a blowout. And not to far in the distant past, I had an employee do the samething.
 

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All of this discussion and not one person has said anything about the NHSTA stating that the proper repair for a punctured tire requires a plug for the hole and patch for the area inside the tire that surrounds the puncture hole.

When I was young, both pre radials and post radials we always hot patched a hole in the tread area. If the hole was big enough we would plug it then hot patch it. Small car tires, PU truck tires, semi truck tires (i hated split rim wheels) as well as tractor, combine, and other farm machinery tires. I have never seen a properly hot patched tire have an issue due to the patch.

With radial plugs that melt and bond to the rubber at road speed covered with a hot patch on the inside of the tire one should never have to worry about having a patch on the tire.
See post #54 above.
 
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