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Discussion Starter #1
The old fluid looked brand new. I'm starting to wonder if changing this stuff every 15k miles is overkill, especially at $24 a gallon. Kind of reminds me of Honda's recommendation of changing the brake fluid, one of the things I see as not needed. I mean, what can go wrong with the fluid any way? It looks like tranny fluid and does not get the workout that a tranny can get and it's change interval is 30k.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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I second Pilot pilot's

Pilot pilot,

I think the manual says first diff fluid change is after 15K, then at every 30K interval.

I changed the diff fluid this weekend, and noticed the same. My neighbor, who used to be a service manager at a Dodge dealer, told me "just check this stuff to see if there's dirty in the oil, if not, you don't need to change this stuff ..." I didn't listen to him, changed it anyway. The oil came out real clean, like brand new.

How much diff fluid did you use up? Did you use up all the 1 gallon? I managed to pump in about 3/4 gallon. I felt it's hard to pump in the oil, some spilt out initially, so I was afraid not put in enough back in. Just want to check with those who performed DIY diff fuild change. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think the book says to change the rear diff fluid at 15k, 30k and then every 30K after that. I guess they want to remove any metal shavings/dust that occurs during break-in. BTW, did you think to wipe off the magnet on the lower plug.

I thought more about my tranny comparison and it came to me... The tranny has a filter but the rear diff does not. I guess that's the reason for more frequent changes.

I also had to pump in about 3/4 of a gallon. The manual says it takes 3 quarts. Yeah, pumping was a bear. I must have pumped for 20 minutes straight. The entire time while laying there I was thinking to myself if I should just pay the dealer to do it next time.
 

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You are right.

You are right, 1st diff fluid change at 15K then at 30K miles, then every 30K miles afterward.
Yes I noticed the short magnetic rod on the lower plug, it had some metal shaving on it. I managed to wiped it clean before installing it back in. Thanks.
 

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Pilot pilot said:
I
I also had to pump in about 3/4 of a gallon. The manual says it takes 3 quarts.
Hmmm....mine took 96 ounces!:confused:
 

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Pilot pilot said:
The old fluid looked brand new. I'm starting to wonder if changing this stuff every 15k miles is overkill, especially at $24 a gallon. Kind of reminds me of Honda's recommendation of changing the brake fluid, one of the things I see as not needed. I mean, what can go wrong with the fluid any way? It looks like tranny fluid and does not get the workout that a tyranny can get and it's change interval is 30k.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Your Wrong! :2: :2:

Well you asked!

6 changes over 150,000 miles at $24 each is not a lot in the end.
Some people here (not ME!) will spend that much on Wax!

It is like tyranny fluid and degrades with time and use.
The Rear has wet clutches that wear with use and the fluid picks up the material.

As for brake fluid, Honda's recommendation to change it is right on.
Almost ALL brake hydraulic problems are caused by old fluid.
Most cars recommend the system be flushed every two years, most never do it and some time before 100,000 miles you end up replacing a master cylinder, wheel cylinder or caliper.

At that point the seals in the rest of the system are no better, they just have not failed YET! All to save $5 of fluid every 2 years.
 

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Re: Re: Just changed rear diff fluid

N_Jay said:

-snip-
As for brake fluid, Honda's recommendation to change it is right on.
Almost ALL brake hydraulic problems are caused by old fluid.
Most cars recommend the system be flushed every two years, most never do it and some time before 100,000 miles you end up replacing a master cylinder, wheel cylinder or caliper.

At that point the seals in the rest of the system are no better, they just have not failed YET! All to save $5 of fluid every 2 years.
I couldn't agree more!!!! And buy a new can each time - don't use out of an opened, partially used can. If you want to use some of out of a partial can for cleaning disk brake components, that's fine.

Just my .02

YMMV
 

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How does one go about changing brake fluid???
 

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MG Pilot said:
How does one go about changing brake fluid???
I presume that it involves locating the master cylinder, which should be found when you remove one of the front tires, and opening a drain cock, and draining the fluid out, then re-filling the container on the firewall under the hood. I'm sure there are details I've left out, particularly related to preventing air bubbles from getting in the lines, but that's the basics as I understand it.
 

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jay said:
I presume that it involves locating the master cylinder, which should be found when you remove one of the front tires, and opening a drain cock, and draining the fluid out, then re-filling the container on the firewall under the hood. I'm sure there are details I've left out, particularly related to preventing air bubbles from getting in the lines, but that's the basics as I understand it.
Close, but no cigar!

You use the same procedure as bleeding the brakes, except you start by draining the brake reservoir and refilling it with new fluid.
You then bleed each caliper till you see the new fluid. If you use a clear hose on the bleeder screw you can usually see a slight difference in fluid color or clarity.
 

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N_Jay said:
Close, but no cigar!

...snip

That's ok, I don't smoke.:1:

Thanks for clarifying.

thread drift-- Did your trip to D.C. get re-scheduled?
 

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Drift response

jay said:
That's ok, I don't smoke.:1:

Thanks for clarifying.

thread drift-- Did your trip to D.C. get re-scheduled?
Friday's flight was canceled, so I went Saturday.
Just got back last night.

Now the waiting starts. (I hate this game!)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The only cars I have owned that required brake fluid changes were Hondas. What is Honda saying? They use substandard rubber in the seals and diaphrams?

I not going to worry about it. I have never had a brake problem related to old fluid. I think more problems and be induced by screwing with it. It's too easy to get air in the lines.
 

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Pilot pilot said:
The only cars I have owned that required brake fluid changes were Hondas. What is Honda saying? They use substandard rubber in the seals and diaphrams?

I not going to worry about it. I have never had a brake problem related to old fluid. I think more problems and be induced by screwing with it. It's too easy to get air in the lines.
Do you keep your cars past 7 years or 100, 000 miles?

I believe most companies are recommending brake fluid changes, especially as the cars are being designed to last longer.

Well, GM and Dodge may not have to worry about it. :D

By the way, you usually bleed the brakes when putting new pads in. So the only extra cost should be the fluid. Not a high cost compaired to replacing an ABS pump or master cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
By the way, you usually bleed the brakes when putting new pads in. So the only extra cost should be the fluid. Not a high cost compaired to replacing an ABS pump or master cylinder.
No. I never bleed the brakes when changing pads. When you do a brake job, you take special precautions to avoid that. A brake job gets real ugly when you have to mess around trying to get the air out of the lines.

Sure, brake fluid is cheap. But the hassle and the labor is not. I subscribe to the KISS method.
 

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Pilot pilot said:
No. I never bleed the brakes when changing pads. When you do a brake job, you take special precautions to avoid that. A brake job gets real ugly when you have to mess around trying to get the air out of the lines.

Sure, brake fluid is cheap. But the hassle and the labor is not. I subscribe to the KISS method.
When you change pads without bleeding the brakes all the old fluid from the caliper goes back into the lines and master cylinder.

This is not a good thing. First the fluid in the calipers has been heated many times and is generally in the worse condition of any fluid in the system. Second, you stir up any particals or contamination and circulate it throuout the system.

If you bleed the brakes properly it is quite difficult to let air into the system. If you are having problems with air getting in check you procedure for bleeding the brakes.

One other issue with you leave it alone tacktic is that it often results in seized bleed screws since they have been unused untill the first significant problem. This alone could result in replacing all the calipers the first time the system need to be bled.
 

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Re: Drift response

N_Jay said:
Friday's flight was canceled, so I went Saturday.
Just got back last night.

Now the waiting starts. (I hate this game!)
Best of luck!:4:
 
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