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Hi all, just learning to do some maintenance myself. Been doing my own oil changes since buying new, but didn't need to jack it up for that, I am able to slide underneath car.

I am wanting to replace the rear shocks. I'm familiar with the 2 areas on each side of the vehicle to put jack stands, but if I want to use a larger floor jack and lift the rear of the car (and put the smaller jacks under the side points for safety), where is it under the vehicle that I place the jack?

And, is that the best way, to raise the entire rear of the car, and then also put the extra jack stands on each side for extra safety? Or should I just use the large floor jack under the rear side jack point and just lift one side at a time? But then I wouldn't have the small stand under there as well for extra safety....

Help a rookie mechanic! :)
 

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Never jacked one of those up but after years of jacking up cars I go with solid points. If you have a frame go there. On something newer I'd look for a place on the control arm. If you're looking for the control arm to relax you could go with the pivot point of the arm or somewhere solid in the center. My experience under cars has always been full frame vehicles and trucks etc. Never been under one of these except for oil changes or brakes and like I said, I go with control arms. It gets the tire off the ground quicker. I'm sure one of these people has done it though and can offer up something better.
 

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In the rear, lift under the rear crossmember where the tie-down bracket sits. This is the crossmember between the rear wheels, forward of the spare tire. Use a wood block on your jack pad there in the middle and lift away.

In the front, there's a similar tie-down ring sticking down on the passenger side of center a bit. It corresponds to the front crossmember under the engine. Wood block on your jack pad will protect the ring.
 

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Don’t forget to chock the wheels before jacking. Chock rear wheels when lifting the front; chock the front wheels when lifting the rear.

And it’s smart that you’re asking about how to do it safely. Never get under a vehicle which is only supported by a jack.
 

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I will also add that you do not need to jack the Pilot up to replace the rear shocks. I replaced my rear shocks 2 weeks ago and it does not require jacking the Pilot.

 

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I will also add that you do not need to jack the Pilot up to replace the rear shocks. I replaced my rear shocks 2 weeks ago and it does not require jacking the Pilot.

Do not follow that idiot's advise. He did jack the car and worked under the car with it on the jack alone. Done properly he should have jacked by the rear jacking point and put a stand under the resting point. If his jack's o-rings gave in, he would have been in a mess of damaged wheel arch plastic covers.
 

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Amen! I've had the dubious honor of having to lift a truck off of what was left of a guy after the jack gave out. It's a lifelong reminder that NOTHING is important enough to get me under a car without stands or on the lift.

As far as needing to jack the car up to change the rears... you don't really. The top damper mountings are accessible by reaching over the tire with a long extension for the bolts and nuts. Bottom bolt is accessible laying on the ground if you have long arms. The springs hold the car at close to normal height without the dampers installed. Keep your body parts completely out of the wheel-well as you work. The top mount has a stud to slide the pin over, and a bolt on the other side. Attach the top first when installing. Remember also that there can easily be some stored energy in a gas-pressure shock when you unbolt it.

That said, it's way easier to do this task with the car on stands and the rear wheels removed. It's almost essential to get the bottom bolt torqued correctly.

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I'm getting old and cynical, and I'm not nearly as immortal as I used to be. The Pilot gets several inspections and other services each year that justify putting it on the lift. I think the only duty the floor jack gets these days is placing some of the toys on stands for winter storage. The garage/workbay is a hobby shop these days, and no good automotive hobby shop can be complete without at least one vehicle lift. Coming from shaky SoCal, I don't ever store cars on the lift except inn the middle of projects. Even then, there are safety stands under the lift carriages and arms with the car as low as possible.
 
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