Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, my wife did. So my wife got this 2014 Pilot a few weeks ago. She wanted new wheels and tires. We bought this new 2020 factory set of Craigslist. New car take-offs with only 15 miles on them. It's a direct bolt on with same bolt circle and center bore diameter. Old tires, which were still nice in my opinion were 235-65-17 with Yokohama YK-HTX. These new ones are 245-60-18 Bridgestone Dueler HP Sport AS.

143065
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,751 Posts
Well, my wife did. So my wife got this 2014 Pilot a few weeks ago. She wanted new wheels and tires. We bought this new 2020 factory set of Craigslist. New car take-offs with only 15 miles on them. It's a direct bolt on with same bolt circle and center bore diameter. Old tires, which were still nice in my opinion were 235-65-17 with Yokohama YK-HTX. These new ones are 245-60-18 Bridgestone Dueler HP Sport AS.
Reviews on those Bridgestone tires seem mixed.
Report back on how the wife likes them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Exactly. There is very decent tread on the old tires. I was thinking $300 for those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Was there any problem with the offset? My 2015, which I think is same as your 2014, was 45 and I believe your new wheels are 55?
Perhaps someone can "school" me on offsets and ramifications/

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am not sure. I did not pay attention to the offset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,381 Posts
Nice wheels! They make a huge difference on the appearance of your vehicle.
As a previous owner of the tires you bought (245/60r18, 3rd Gen), I've got nothing good to say about the choice. Can you take them back? Sorry for being negative on these. They lacked stability in highway speed turns. They would roll over on the sidewalls.
143088
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Wow, tough crowd. Well, I can't take them back. It was a Craigslist deal and a very good deal at that. Those are the factory supplied tires for the Pilot. The guy had only driven from the dealer lot to the wheel and tires store and bought 20's. Anyhow, looking at the ratings posted above, the low marks are all for snow and ice. I live in south Texas so I could care less about that. And regarding your comments about stability and turning...those are the highest ratings in that survey. Maybe you just as a single individual had a bad experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,381 Posts
Well, I can't take them back. It was a Craigslist deal and a very good deal at that. Those are the factory supplied tires for the Pilot. The guy had only driven from the dealer lot to the wheel and tires store and bought 20's. Anyhow, looking at the ratings posted above, the low marks are all for snow and ice. I live in south Texas so I could care less about that.
I'm here in South Texas.
Again, love the rims.
These tires were not safe on the Interstate with my Pilot loaded with the family. Always had to let off the gas or be in the wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,751 Posts
I'm here in South Texas.
Again, love the rims.
These tires were not safe on the Interstate with my Pilot loaded with the family. Always had to let off the gas or be in the wall.
What's the total weight of the "family"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm here in South Texas.
Again, love the rims.
These tires were not safe on the Interstate with my Pilot loaded with the family. Always had to let off the gas or be in the wall.
Ok. Fair enough. I'm in San Antonio. I guess I will see how it goes. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,381 Posts
Ok. Fair enough. I'm in San Antonio. I guess I will see how it goes. Thank you.
Thank you for the photo. I'd think anyone with a 2nd Gen Pilot would be looking for some 3rd Gen rims. 😀
There was a decent snow in S.A. 2017. But 1985 was another world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,526 Posts
Was there any problem with the offset? My 2015, which I think is same as your 2014, was 45 and I believe your new wheels are 55?
If your numbers are accurate the new wheels may be positioned approximately 0.4” closer to the strut. If there is no other contact the OP should be GTG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,381 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
If your numbers are accurate the new wheels may be positioned approximately 0.4” closer to the strut. If there is no other contact the OP should be GTG
Thanks very much for the clarification; so the greater the offset the narrower the track; and you may need to worry about clearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,526 Posts
Thanks very much for the clarification; so the greater the offset the narrower the track; and you may need to worry about clearance.
Check out this website for more information. I plugged in the numbers to get a visual. You can see a simulation of how changing offset could be fine or cause problems. This won’t tell you whether the changes will be positive or negative for the driving experience
Product Text Line Font Parallel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,462 Posts
That calculator reminds me that the "scrub radius" parameter can be pretty important. It's essentially the difference between a line through the suspension pivots and the center of the tire contact patch. For steering stability, especially when there's uneven pressure on the front wheels, a negative scrub radius (NSR) helps tons. Hit a pothole, water or sand under one wheel only, a flat front tire, etc., would normally pull the car towards the side with extra drag. Negative scrub radius causes the steering to counteract that. It doesn't turn the steering wheels for you, it keeps them from being turned for you.

As you shop for wheels, keeping the offset numbers the same as the factory number is the easiest way to make sure you don't accidentally lose the benefits of NSR. On cars with struts especially, increasing total tire diameter causes the net scrub radius number to go further negative if no other changes are made. This is a Good Thing, as larger tires are typically heavier and can take more advantage of the geometry change.

Wheels with smaller offset value, definitely not that good for steering stability. You may not notice it much in normal driving, but having the correct scrub radius can be a lifesaver in an emergency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,526 Posts
That calculator reminds me that the "scrub radius" parameter can be pretty important. It's essentially the difference between a line through the suspension pivots and the center of the tire contact patch. For steering stability, especially when there's uneven pressure on the front wheels, a negative scrub radius (NSR) helps tons. Hit a pothole, water or sand under one wheel only, a flat front tire, etc., would normally pull the car towards the side with extra drag. Negative scrub radius causes the steering to counteract that. It doesn't turn the steering wheels for you, it keeps them from being turned for you.

As you shop for wheels, keeping the offset numbers the same as the factory number is the easiest way to make sure you don't accidentally lose the benefits of NSR. On cars with struts especially, increasing total tire diameter causes the net scrub radius number to go further negative if no other changes are made. This is a Good Thing, as larger tires are typically heavier and can take more advantage of the geometry change.

Wheels with smaller offset value, definitely not that good for steering stability. You may not notice it much in normal driving, but having the correct scrub radius can be a lifesaver in an emergency.
Great discussion on Negative Scrub Radius but there are some Pilot owners that like to have fun and push the limits....
Tire Motor vehicle Wheel Vehicle Automotive design
Motor vehicle Automotive tail & brake light Vehicle Automotive exterior Automotive lighting
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top