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2008 Pilot EX-L
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Discussion Starter #1
I had it planned out for three years. Now I am looking at seven, stupid Covid.
Any one here retiring.
 

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2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD
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523 Posts
I don't have a good plan.
I should, but there's some things in life some people aren't good at.
I'll work until they won't let me anymore I'm thinking.

I should have had a better plan from the start, but I don't.
With better planning early, I could have already been 'retired' I suppose.
 

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2008 Pilot EX-L
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293 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I don't have a good plan.
I should, but there's some things in life some people aren't good at.
I'll work until they won't let me anymore I'm thinking.

I should have had a better plan from the start, but I don't.
With better planning early, I could have already been 'retired' I suppose.
I would work longer, I like working. Just thirty years of truck tires killed my knees.
Now that I drive truck, it is easier on my body, but my knees I do not know how much longer they will hold up.
 

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2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD
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523 Posts
Truck driver, CDL? Do they have to have that in Canada?

I do DOT physicals- for CDL drivers.
 

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2008 Pilot EX-L
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293 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Truck driver, CDL? Do they have to have that in Canada?

I do DOT physicals- for CDL drivers.
Yes CDL. The MTO physical is a pain, as I no longer have a Family Doctor, He passed away.
Have to go to a walk in clinic, and they really do not know how to fill in the forms properly.
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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I retired at 62. Plan was simple. At 24 the wife, a banker, and I started saving for retirement. We put a few bucks away every pay check into a retirement plan. As our wages grew over the years so did out contributions and the variety of where we saved. Savings bonds, 401K, Roth, pension plans as well as good old cash savings. You would be amazed at what $20.00 a week every week for 40 years can grow to if left alone in a good plan.

Long story short, when I decided to retire from my previous place of employment after 34 years I told the wife that I was going to retire. She inquired when I planned to do so. My response was whenever I found another job, not related to my previous one. I asked her how much I realistically needed in a salary to maintain our current state of living.

She laughed at me and told me that I didn't need to work if I didn't want to, and that we were well set for our future. So I retired. I volunteered at a hospital 3 days a week until Covid hit, but as for retirement............

......everyone ought to try it once in their life. It's pretty good.
 

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2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD
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Yes CDL. The MTO physical is a pain, as I no longer have a Family Doctor, He passed away.
Have to go to a walk in clinic, and they really do not know how to fill in the forms properly.
In the states, you have to have a separate certification, etc. It's a big deal sort of.
So a medical provider can't do them, without this extra cert.

I've only sought after and attained that a few years ago, but been in practice for 25 yrs.
 

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2008 Pilot EX-L
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Discussion Starter #10
I retired at 62. Plan was simple. At 24 the wife, a banker, and I started saving for retirement. We put a few bucks away every pay check into a retirement plan. As our wages grew over the years so did out contributions and the variety of where we saved. Savings bonds, 401K, Roth, pension plans as well as good old cash savings. You would be amazed at what $20.00 a week every week for 40 years can grow to if left alone in a good plan.

Long story short, when I decided to retire from my previous place of employment after 34 years I told the wife that I was going to retire. She inquired when I planned to do so. My response was whenever I found another job, not related to my previous one. I asked her how much I realistically needed in a salary to maintain our current state of living.

She laughed at me and told me that I didn't need to work if I didn't want to, and that we were well set for our future. So I retired. I volunteered at a hospital 3 days a week until Covid hit, but as for retirement............

......everyone ought to try it once in their life. It's pretty good.
When I first got promoted to doing after hour calls, wife and I decided to put the night call money in a separate bank account. This was the late 80s. After a year of saving night call money we had a 30% down payment for our first home.
So, yes it is good to try to put a little aside.
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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When I first got promoted to doing after hour calls, wife and I decided to put the night call money in a separate bank account. This was the late 80s. After a year of saving night call money we had a 30% down payment for our first home.
So, yes it is good to try to put a little aside.
Yep, we started saving in 1979 with just savings, I started a retirement savings, don't remember the name now, a Roth or an IRA of some kind. The wife had the same thing as well as a bond program where she would purchase $100 savings bonds over time of course. When I changed jobs it came with a pension plan. I also started a deferred comp account. As raises came along the majority of the raise went into the deferred comp. She retired from one bank with a 401 K and a pension plan to take a job at another bank where she started another 401.

The other thing I had was what was called a drop program. My pension maxed out at 30 years. I stayed for 34 years because of the drop. Basically what the drop program does is where I worked they would bank the amount of pension I would get monthly for up to 5 years. We also were able to accrue unlimited sick time. Vacation was a use/lose thing, but sick time carried over from year to year and it could count towards my retirement. So instead of retiring at 29 years I did the drop. I was able to retire after 4 years in the drop program with the full 5 year drop. The check they handed me when I walked out the door for my drop program + 3% interest was well over 300K. That check went directly to the wife and her bank where it was invested.

The wife is a senior VP at the bank in charge of the trust division. She opened up a new investment account with that money and the return has averaged around 11-12% every year. We also took a chunk of money from the farm income that had accumulated over the years and opened a second investment account.

When home loan insurance no longer mattered for taxes, we paid the house off out of savings and the monthly mortgage payment now goes into the second investment account. We figured the tradeoff was good as the cash in savings was earning .5%, we were paying 2.5% on the home loan. With out a mortgage to pay off, the investment account now receives monthly what was the mortgage payment. It also is averaging 11-12% return annually.

I grew up poor and the wife was one of 5 Air Force brats so she did not come from money. I didn't marry rich, but I did marry smart.
 

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Worked at a fun, but not very profitable job until I was 33 years old. At that point I got a new job that had a 401K program that paid a 5% match so I got in for 5% and increased my contribution at every raise. I took a third shift position that paid another 12% and I put that into my 401K. My wife had a good job and took advantage of her 401K as well. At age 56 I had enough. Catching crap from above and below was no longer fun so I took my money and retired. I am now 65 and have been having a blast for the last nine years. My wife retired in May of 2018 at age 59 and we spent a month running around Alaska in a rented RV. We are motorcyclist and have been on several rides where we spent 7 or 8 weeks on the road. Wealthy? No, but able to do what we enjoy. Putting back a few bucks over time really does pay off. If a dummy like me can pull it off anyone can.
 

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If my wife and I had stuck to our original plan of being dinks (double income no kids) when we got married 20 years ago we would have been on track to retire by 2030. Now with two kids and a single income 2040 is probably a bit more realistic. But I love my wife and kids so I’m okay with having to work another 10 years beyond the original plan.
 

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2020 Pilot Black Edition - Trailer hitch & Harness, All-weather Mats, cargo mat, and Black Emblems
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25 to 30 yrs, but who’s counting lol
 

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If I retired, I'd end up wasting all my time on some internet forum.

I started young, fresh out of grad school. I've put in my 35 years and then some. I've tried to balance offering my family a good home and a good life, private school K through U and every opportunity for the kids, and a rich variety of cultural, sporting and travel experiences, with being frugal, reasonable, and planning for the future.

This COVID thing's timing made my decision easier. I still do pretty safe volunteer stuff.

I'm 58. How old are you guys?
 

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I'm 32 and started my County job last year at 31. So 30 years for the full pension gets me to 61 but if I like what I'm doing I'll probably stick around until at least 65. I could never fully retire and need something to do with myself, so if grandkids aren't in the picture by that time I will probably pick up 2 or 3 days a week at somewhere like Home Depot. I always loved working there in college and in retirement it would be a good thing to have a job with some physical aspect to it.

What about your wife?
She married someone who can cook... It sounds like a a pretty balanced relationship to me...

If my wife and I had stuck to our original plan of being dinks (double income no kids) when we got married 20 years ago we would have been on track to retire by 2030. Now with two kids and a single income 2040 is probably a bit more realistic. But I love my wife and kids so I’m okay with having to work another 10 years beyond the original plan.
I tried but got a hard pass on no kids too. Instead we have our tiny house, used cars and budget vacations. We make it work.
 

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15 or so.
 
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