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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a CTEK MXS 5.0 to keep my Pilot and CRV batteries charged due to low amounts of driving recently. How do I actually charge the battery in the Pilot? Will connecting the plus terminal and negative to the body frame work, or do I really have to take the entire front half compartment, etc. off to get to the battery for a simple charge? Also, what about a jump pack? Is it safe to use the positive only battery terminal and frame for negative for these?

Another question, does the 2019 Touring from the factory have an AGM battery or regular lead-acid 12V?

Thank you in advance.
 

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To get to the negative bat terminal takes <1 minute. Remove 2 pieces of plastic and 2 plastic screws.
 

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You should be ok connecting the trickle charger to the positive terminal and the frame. Just make sure what the negative lead attaches to is unpainted bolt into the frame.
If I had to guess, your touring has an AGM. Your vehicle is equipped with the dreaded auto start stop function = AGM.
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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If you want to make life simple, go to CTEK's site and buy a second set of the ring end charging wired. Attache the red ring to the positive terminal bolt and the black ring to the negative terminal bolt. When you need to charge the battery plug in the cable. When not charging it tuck the charging terminal out of the way in a secure position. I don't know the CTEK connectors have covers. I have a Schumacher that is similar and I ran the connector to the front and zip tied it out of site behind the front grill. I just pull it out, take the cap off and plug it in.
 

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If you want to make life simple, go to CTEK's site and buy a second set of the ring end charging wired.
Daltongang has the very best solution to avoid taking off all that plastic covering junk, or hunting for a negative ground within reach. Here is an example: CTEK connector.

I put that sort of connection on my Pilot too for all the same problems you mentioned. Now all I do is plug in my Noco charger to what you see in my hand. Super easy!

IMG_2225.JPG
 

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You can and should use the "engine hanger" as shown on page 703 of the online owners manual for the 2019 Pilot.

. Connect the other end of the second jumper cable to the engine hanger as shown. Do not connect this jumper cable to any other part

This is where Honda says to connect the negative cable to your Pilot when jumping or charging. You may have to pull the engine cover off, but shouldn't have to remove anything else. I don't remember if the engine cover has to come off, or if the hanger is accessible without removing anything.

Make sure your charger can be used on the AGM battery which your Touring should have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you want to make life simple, go to CTEK's site and buy a second set of the ring end charging wired. Attache the red ring to the positive terminal bolt and the black ring to the negative terminal bolt. When you need to charge the battery plug in the cable. When not charging it tuck the charging terminal out of the way in a secure position. I don't know the CTEK connectors have covers. I have a Schumacher that is similar and I ran the connector to the front and zip tied it out of site behind the front grill. I just pull it out, take the cap off and plug it in.
Daltongang has the very best solution to avoid taking off all that plastic covering junk, or hunting for a negative ground within reach. Here is an example: CTEK connector.

I put that sort of connection on my Pilot too for all the same problems you mentioned. Now all I do is plug in my Noco charger to what you see in my hand. Super easy!

View attachment 144959
Thank you. This is exactly what I am looking to do! Is the M8 the size I need? Also, I just unscrew the bolt nut, attach this, and screw the nut back in the battery terminal connector, correct? Sorry for the crazy dumb questions, I am new to this!
 

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Thank you. This is exactly what I am looking to do! Is the M8 the size I need? Also, I just unscrew the bolt nut, attach this, and screw the nut back in the battery terminal connector, correct? Sorry for the crazy dumb questions, I am new to this!
M8 looks like it will do. You are only maintaining the battery not trying to jump start the car with a dead battery. I took the nut off and pulled the bold putting the ring clip on the bolt side instead of the nut side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One additional question on this. I am looking at these jump starting procedures. On step 4, they are clamping the negative directly onto the frame. Is there a reason why this would not work to charge the battery? When I first purchased my 2019 Pilot, the battery was dead after 200 miles on the odometer. I am pretty sure the dealer and Honda Care jumped my Pilot at the exact same spot.

How to Jumpstart a 2016-2019 Honda Pilot 2016 Honda Pilot EX 3.5L V6

I also see in this YouTube where they are adding a partially threaded bolt. Would this cause any rusting, etc. in the future? I already have my Pilot paid off and planning to keep it awhile.


Thanks,
 

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One additional question on this. I am looking at these jump starting procedures. On step 4, they are clamping the negative directly onto the frame. Is there a reason why this would not work to charge the battery? When I first purchased my 2019 Pilot, the battery was dead after 200 miles on the odometer. I am pretty sure the dealer and Honda Care jumped my Pilot at the exact same spot.

How to Jumpstart a 2016-2019 Honda Pilot 2016 Honda Pilot EX 3.5L V6

I also see in this YouTube where they are adding a partially threaded bolt. Would this cause any rusting, etc. in the future? I already have my Pilot paid off and planning to keep it awhile.


Thanks,
If you check the Honda Manual for your vehicle, Page 702, you will see that when jump starting the vehicle the negative goes to the negative ground protrusion on the engine, not the car body.

The bolt idea has been around for a while. My two issues with it are that that small bolt may not provide sufficient contact through the thin sheet metal of the body. Secondly is the placement, that is usually quite near the battery. When jump starting a dead battery, especially one that has been dead a while, there is always the possibility of the battery exploding due to off gassing of hydrogen gas. AGM batteries do, contrary to the belief held by some, off gas. The tiny bit of off gassing that all batteries do is usually absorbed by the glass mat in the battery. However a deeply depleted AGM battery will off gas more than the glass mat can absorb.

If you have never seen a battery explode it is very much a Myth Busters explosion. My dad and I were at the charging end of a battery explosion several years ago. The car owner hooked the negative up too close to the battery, when he accidentally jiggled the cables a spark set off the hydrogen off gas. It actually did damage to the engine compartment.

To each their own. I tend to error on the side of caution, that is why i have a pair of goggles in the back of my vehicle along with the jumper cables. The good old science class kind.
 

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Once again I strongly second what Daltongang advises about battery jumping procedures and that YouTube bolt idea. When it comes to safety, there is no right way to do a wrong thing. A couple of weeks ago I used my volt meter to verify the milliamp draw on the negative cable of my Pilot's battery. Much to my surprise the multi meter's probe generated a tiny, but noticeable spark when I touched the battery post with it. I've since learned that can be a common occurrence with a volt meter when doing that sort of test on a battery, but nonetheless it was unexpected and freaked me because I was so exposed at the time. So much so that I decided to spend a bunch of beer money on a new toy instead ... a DC Clamp meter that is less prone to creating sparks. It's in route from Amazon as I write this post. No joke. Be safe!
 
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