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I live in N.Virginia. I traded in my CRV for Honda Pilot 2021 2wd few days ago. When I was buying only thought about $2K less I was paying but not about advantages of awd. I was not much aware and thought 2wd would do good for snow. Now I see all people have awd only which makes me worry that I made a huge mistake. Is it worth for me to talk to dealer and replace with awd model. I know I will loose couple of thousands dollar now. It is just not giving me peace of mind that 2wd will be issue in snow and wont hold much value after few yrs. I would appreciate any suggestion.
 

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I used to live in Springfield and we used to get a good snow storm every other year but now they're becoming less frequent. An AWD will help a little in the snow but not as much as a good set of tires and actually knowing how to drive in the snow. The Honda AWD system will require more maintenance over its lifespan unless you offload it early. If you are really worried about a vehicle holding value then don't buy new, they are a terrible investment if you could call it an investment at all. The only thing you're investing in is not spending downtime replacing parts ;)
 

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Definitely inquire if you can swap for an AWD model.
Some dealers will let you exchange a new car for another one within a certain mileage/time period limit.
As an example, Hyundai has a 3-day exchange policy.
Hyundai Shopper Assurance | Hyundai USA

Extra maintenance for the AWD system is limited to some fluid changes, the cost of which shouldn't be an issue unless buying a $30K-$50K vehicle puts you on the brink of financial hardship.
OTOH, if you are really concerned about saving $2K, then maybe you should be looking at a less expensive vehicle.
 

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The biggest advantage will be not lighting up the poor right front tire when trying to pull out in traffic. It’s a heavy car. We don’t need awd for snow in GA, but our right front sure wishes we had it even in the summer.
 

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If I was going up and down hills in snowy weather, I'd want AWD. Otherwise, if your on flat terrain, a 2wd may suffice by controlling speed. As others have stated, it's more economical to own a 2wd.
 
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I used to live in Michigan. Stoping in slippry roads is bigger issue than getting stuck.
What people forget is that all vehicles have 4 wheel brakes.
Like others said get a good set of winter tires and you will be good to go.
Unless you go off-road you do not need AWD imo.
 

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Is this your first time living in a place that gets snow? I ask because in a place like N. VA most people manage just fine with 2wd and regular tires by just going easy on the throttle and slowing down a bit. Unless you have to deal with regular heavy snows or badly/unplowed roads then you don't have much to worry about. If you're worried about peace of mind, then getting more capable tires for the snow will be cheaper than trading up now. Either a 3 Peak Mountain Snowflake rated all-weather tire or a proper studless winter tire like Blizzaks.

As for long term resale value you can check 2016+ Pilots and see the difference between FWD and AWD for this generation. That will at least help you quantify your decision.
 

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My in laws are in SC (upstate) which is much like VA. If it does snow, it melts quick. People stay home for a few hours. If you plan to tow you’ll quickly discover the weight on the rear end reduces traction.

I would stick with the fwd Pilot. Depreciation has happened. In a couple of years, they’ll be a new generation Pilot. You’ll know for sure what you want by then and can trade “up”.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok
My in laws are in SC (upstate) which is much like VA. If it does snow, it melts quick. People stay home for a few hours. If you plan to tow you’ll quickly discover the weight on the rear end reduces traction.

I would stick with the fwd Pilot. Depreciation has happened. In a couple of years, they’ll be a new generation Pilot. You’ll know for sure what you want by then and can trade “up”.
I usually work from home during snow and no any plans to drive in off road as well. It only gives me peace of mind if I would need to drive in snow due to some emergency. And other concern is the value after few years for 2wd SUV. Well one option is I can just see for few years how it can handle and upgrade with some old model at time that has awd.
 

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I would stick with the 2wd, and get some decent tires. We have Vredestein on our TSX, and drove around fine in Upstate NY. Northern VA would not be much of a challenge.
 

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Was the CRV AWD or FWD and did you have any issues? How long have you lived there to experience the weather? I personally wouldn't get a front wheel drive SUV (or a 2WD pickup) but I live in area with more snow and use it for beach, ski trips, hunting cabin etc.

I went to school 20 minutes from Canada and only had a FWD Civic and a RWD Malibu wagon. My parents never had an AWD/4WD vehicle and still don't. With proper winter tires you can get through most things no issue. Only concern is ground clearance to limit you. Most places get plowed in a decent time frame. The 3rd gen Pilot unfortunately doesn't have much more ground clearance than most cars.

You already bought the FWD, spend some of that savings and get 4 good winter tires perferably with spare rims so you can change them yourself, Blizzaks are good but wear to fast IMO. I have Continental VikingContact 7 on my kids cars and the previous version WinterContact on my Accord and Pilot. Michelin X-ice Snow is only version with a treadwear warranty. The all weather 3PMSF versions are better than what you have stock but not as good as true winter if you are in snow/ice.

Some preparedness plans help reduce the perceived emergencies and need to go out when others that are not good in snow/ice have to go out. Back up power source, mainly for heat and refrigerators. Always a couple days worth of dry and canned foods and water bottles. buy to rotate stock on all weekly or as needed. We did almost 2 weeks with no power and almost no gas stations had gas or power. Generator ran intermittently a couple times daily to power the boiler (heat and showers) and bring fridge/freezers back to cold. We cooked on the BBQ. Any storm forecasted I fill all the cars and the gas cans. Between the cars and cans there is almost 100 gallons of fuel. You preparedness levels may vary. My next generator will be a dual fuel so I can run propane (no NG on my street). It reduces the issues of carburetor getting messed up due to ethanol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Was the CRV AWD or FWD and did you have any issues? How long have you lived there to experience the weather? I personally wouldn't get a front wheel drive SUV (or a 2WD pickup) but I live in area with more snow and use it for beach, ski trips, hunting cabin etc.

I went to school 20 minutes from Canada and only had a FWD Civic and a RWD Malibu wagon. My parents never had an AWD/4WD vehicle and still don't. With proper winter tires you can get through most things no issue. Only concern is ground clearance to limit you. Most places get plowed in a decent time frame. The 3rd gen Pilot unfortunately doesn't have much more ground clearance than most cars.

You already bought the FWD, spend some of that savings and get 4 good winter tires perferably with spare rims so you can change them yourself, Blizzaks are good but wear to fast IMO. I have Continental VikingContact 7 on my kids cars and the previous version WinterContact on my Accord and Pilot. Michelin X-ice Snow is only version with a treadwear warranty. The all weather 3PMSF versions are better than what you have stock but not as good as true winter if you are in snow/ice.

Some preparedness plans help reduce the perceived emergencies and need to go out when others that are not good in snow/ice have to go out. Back up power source, mainly for heat and refrigerators. Always a couple days worth of dry and canned foods and water bottles. buy to rotate stock on all weekly or as needed. We did almost 2 weeks with no power and almost no gas stations had gas or power. Generator ran intermittently a couple times daily to power the boiler (heat and showers) and bring fridge/freezers back to cold. We cooked on the BBQ. Any storm forecasted I fill all the cars and the gas cans. Between the cars and cans there is almost 100 gallons of fuel. You preparedness levels may vary. My next generator will be a dual fuel so I can run propane (no NG on my street). It reduces the issues of carburetor getting messed up due to ethanol.
Crv was 2016 awd which I got because I didn’t think about budget at that time. The reason I traded in was because of growing family. I cannot keep two so I decided to trade in with the same dealer that bought. They kept sending mails for upgrade so I thought it was good idea to get a big one as I would need one when my parents are visiting for couple of months and they are from outside. Dealer also didn’t gave differences to me as they only cared If I would purchase car if it was affordable. Now I am regretting for that decision for saving 2K as I don’t see much 2wd suvs in my area.
 

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Once upon a time I lost my mind and traded my only 4WD vehicle for a FWD vehicle to gain some mpg. That winter 🥶 ❄ became the Storm of the Century and spanked me real hard. For the first time I became dependent upon the state to plow the area as I was home bound by the weather and state mandated restrictions for several days. That was just heavy snow and the next few weeks roads remained treacherous with ice and black ice.
Never again. The positive attributes of AWD is more than just the few winter months. Just make arrangements to have fluids replaced as per manual. The VTM-4 works but the driver has to be smart too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you all for valuable responses. I have decided to keep it otherwise it would be significant loss for me financially. I don’t do off road and intend to drive out of state in snow. I can work from home if there is snow. I can see how it will work for me for next couple of years in snow. It snows couple of time in a year except the 2016 storm which was huge one. I will trade in with some old model if I have to in 3-4 years.
 

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Not far from you in MD. The Pilot is the 1st AWD vehicle I’ve owned. It hasn’t seen a significant snow yet but AWD has been nice on wet roads. Prior vehicle was an Ody. That thing was a beast in the snow. I’m sure the 2WD Pilot will do just fine in our climate.
 

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Additional maintenance for the AWD version involves $20 worth of Dual Pump Fluid II and $5 worth of gear oil every ~30,000 miles. It's really not very significant. You will lose about 1 MPG.

The iVTM-4 AWD system's advantages are more even tire wear and improved traction not only in snow, but on wet roads as well. It isn't just about snow performance. In fact, iVTM-4 has handing advantages in everyday driving on dry pavement as well thanks to the ability to send more power to the rear wheels (70% vs. the CR-V's 50%) and it has torque vectoring (sends more power to the outside rear wheel while accelerating through a turn to help create a yaw moment and give the vehicle a bit of RWD feel). AWD models with a transmission fluid cooler can also tow up to 5,000 lbs. vs 3,500 lbs. in case you ever intent to tow.
 

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Additional maintenance for the AWD version involves $20 worth of Dual Pump Fluid II and $5 worth of gear oil every ~30,000 miles. It's really not very significant. You will lose about 1 MPG.

The iVTM-4 AWD system's advantages are more even tire wear and improved traction not only in snow, but on wet roads as well. It isn't just about snow performance. In fact, iVTM-4 has handing advantages in everyday driving on dry pavement as well thanks to the ability to send more power to the rear wheels (70% vs. the CR-V's 50%) and it has torque vectoring (sends more power to the outside rear wheel while accelerating through a turn to help create a yaw moment and give the vehicle a bit of RWD feel). AWD models with a transmission fluid cooler can also tow up to 5,000 lbs. vs 3,500 lbs. in case you ever intent to tow.
It's not the fluid itself that kills you in maintenance. It's if it breaks and the cost a dealership charges to do it. It's just more that can go wrong.
 
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Honda's iVTM-4 AWD systems have proven exceedingly reliable. Very rarely do you hear of a failure.

A dealership isn't the only place that can change the rear differential and transfer case fluid - anyone with the most basic of mechanical skills can accomplish this whether it's your favorite independent shop or in your own driveway - it's hardly more difficult than an oil change.
 

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I live in N.Virginia. I traded in my CRV for Honda Pilot 2021 2wd few days ago. When I was buying only thought about $2K less I was paying but not about advantages of awd. I was not much aware and thought 2wd would do good for snow. Now I see all people have awd only which makes me worry that I made a huge mistake. Is it worth for me to talk to dealer and replace with awd model. I know I will loose couple of thousands dollar now. It is just not giving me peace of mind that 2wd will be issue in snow and wont hold much value after few yrs. I would appreciate any suggestion.
Id get rid of it. Go back and get an awd model.

Not just a snow/ice feature. Mud, grass etc. You live close enough to snow belt that saleability will be poorer.
 

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I used to live in Michigan. Stoping in slippry roads is bigger issue than getting stuck.
What people forget is that all vehicles have 4 wheel brakes.
Like others said get a good set of winter tires and you will be good to go.
Unless you go off-road you do not need AWD imo.
I agree. The 1995 Volvo 850 Turbo I had back in northern IL had lots of torque (I learned about torque steer the first time I turned a corner in a 45 mph zone and floored the accelerator; the car just wanted to keep turning right.). The OEM high performance tires were like skis in snow. I bought 4 OEM steel wheels and Gislaved snow tires which I put on for winter. The Volvo had a transmission start mode that would start the car in 2nd gear which was very useful in slippery conditions considering the power of the engine. I think it was part of the winter package on the car which included heated outside mirrors and washers and wipers for the headlights which were really useful at night in snow weather when other cars are throwing up lots of snow, slush and dirt.

I never had an issue driving in snow from 1995 when I bought it until we moved to AZ in 2002 and my wife inherited it.
 
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