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i have a 2020 exl which i'm happy with. what bothers me is the suspension over rough surfaces. especially the rear suspension. it's pretty harsh. i feel the pilot should have a more luxury compliant ride.is this due to the shocks; the springs; or both? or maybe some other components? is there a way to soften things up? i've lowered the tire pressure to just above the recommended 32 lbs. it helped somewhat, but it's still jarring.
 

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My 2019 EX-L’s ride is fine. Not sure about softer springs as the vehicle has quite a bit of body roll as is. There is suspension noise from the rear when hitting rough spots. When I was shopping for my vehicle I test drove EXs, EX-Ls and Tourings. They all had the same rear suspension noise. Also make sure your spare tire is tight else it will rattle against the under side of the cargo floor.
 

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i have a 2020 exl which i'm happy with. what bothers me is the suspension over rough surfaces. especially the rear suspension. it's pretty harsh. i feel the pilot should have a more luxury compliant ride.is this due to the shocks; the springs; or both? or maybe some other components? is there a way to soften things up? i've lowered the tire pressure to just above the recommended 32 lbs. it helped somewhat, but it's still jarring.
Different tires might improve the ride quality.
 

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My 2017 EX-L was to squishy.
The 32Lb light weight 18in Bridgestone tires could not hold a high speed turn without rolling over on the sidewalls. Now with my new High Performance Sumitomo HTR A/S P02 tires inflated to 38 psi cold (42psi hot), the vehicle still rides nice with much more control. I did sacrifice some mpg going to a 35lb tire, but the 4200Lb vehicle is firmly planted and the stability fears are over.
 

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The Pilot employs Amplitude Reactive Dampers. The ARDs are mechanically actuated and are designed to be firmer as suspension travel increases. This allows the engineers to tune the suspension for a more compliant ride since the dampers stiffen up when the suspension is compressed due to body roll in a curve. The downside is they tend to produce a harsher ride on rough pavement at slower speeds. Since they are mechanical only devices, there’s no intelligence to detect when the vehicle needs stiffer dampers during cornering or emergency maneuvers vs not needing stiffer dampers while driving straight on bumpy pavement at 25 mph. Fully active suspension systems solve this problem by introducing electro-mechanical dampers and a computer to set damping in real time at each damper. These active systems produce much improved ride and handling but the downside is purchase and maintenance costs. This thread on ARDs discusses some of what you may be experiencing:
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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You bought a unibody truck with a full passenger body on it. The Pilots and Passports are built on the same body as the Ridgeline. The Pilot has a softer ride then the Passport Elite or Touring, as they have the full Ridgeline suspension. As a consequence you are going to get a more truck like ride. That's the nature of a true SUV. The CR-V on the other hand has a smoother ride as it is a CUV, a vehicle built on an automotive frame using auto suspension components.

The Odyssey, while built on the same frame does ride smoother, due to the different suspension Honda puts in it. but then it's not designed to ever leave a road, besides soccer fields usually have parking lots. I've been driving trucks all my life and one method to get a smoother ride is to slow down. One of the hardest things on a vehicle and it's suspension it driving too fast in rough conditions.
 

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The Pilot employs Amplitude Reactive Dampers. The ARDs are mechanically actuated and are designed to be firmer as suspension travel increases. This allows the engineers to tune the suspension for a more compliant ride since the dampers stiffen up when the suspension is compressed due to body roll in a curve. The downside is they tend to produce a harsher ride on rough pavement at slower speeds. Since they are mechanical only devices, there’s no intelligence to detect when the vehicle needs stiffer dampers during cornering or emergency maneuvers vs not needing stiffer dampers while driving straight on bumpy pavement at 25 mph. Fully active suspension systems solve this problem by introducing electro-mechanical dampers and a computer to set damping in real time at each damper. These active systems produce much improved ride and handling but the downside is purchase and maintenance costs. This thread on ARDs discusses some of what you may be experiencing:
After watching this video, I now see why I like my High Performance tire with this suspension. I feel like ...
136692

in a mom mobile.
 

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My 2019 EX-L’s ride is fine. Not sure about softer springs as the vehicle has quite a bit of body roll as is. There is suspension noise from the rear when hitting rough spots. When I was shopping for my vehicle I test drove EXs, EX-Ls and Tourings. They all had the same rear suspension noise. Also make sure your spare tire is tight else it will rattle against the under side of the cargo floor.
My 2019 exl has a metal to metal noise when I hit sharp bumps in the rear. It has been in the shop twice for it. They did someting with the brake and it went away for a short time. I'm just going to live with it. Close the windows and you won't hear it.
 

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So with this fancy ARD, will it matter if we install aftermarket sway bars or strut tower braces? and does anyone know who makes these parts?

I feel like the Pilot has too much body roll. (3rd gen touring AWD here)


The Pilot employs Amplitude Reactive Dampers. The ARDs are mechanically actuated and are designed to be firmer as suspension travel increases. This allows the engineers to tune the suspension for a more compliant ride since the dampers stiffen up when the suspension is compressed due to body roll in a curve. The downside is they tend to produce a harsher ride on rough pavement at slower speeds. Since they are mechanical only devices, there’s no intelligence to detect when the vehicle needs stiffer dampers during cornering or emergency maneuvers vs not needing stiffer dampers while driving straight on bumpy pavement at 25 mph. Fully active suspension systems solve this problem by introducing electro-mechanical dampers and a computer to set damping in real time at each damper. These active systems produce much improved ride and handling but the downside is purchase and maintenance costs. This thread on ARDs discusses some of what you may be experiencing:
 

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So with this fancy ARD, will it matter if we install aftermarket sway bars or strut tower braces? and does anyone know who makes these parts?

I feel like the Pilot has too much body roll. (3rd gen touring AWD here)
Sounds like you might want to get off of those squishy touring tires. I solved my stability issue with a set of High Performance Sumitomo HTR A/S P02s (now P03).
 
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So with this fancy ARD, will it matter if we install aftermarket sway bars or strut tower braces? and does anyone know who makes these parts?

I feel like the Pilot has too much body roll. (3rd gen touring AWD here)
I'd be interested too.
I searched on Google and couldn't find anything. My assumption though was it would be made for a Ridgeline.
 
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