Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am in the market for the 2014-2015 honda pilot, can someone give me some pros and cons to either , and advantages and disadvantages.....
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
824 Posts
Depends on where you live. Obviously 4WD adds weight to the car and will lead to a decrease in mileage. Also its another thing that needs fluid changes and potentially other break downs. Did all Pilots during those years have VCM on them? Because it used to be that the 4WD ones didn't and that was a selling point for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
Depends on where you live. Obviously 4WD adds weight to the car and will lead to a decrease in mileage. Also its another thing that needs fluid changes and potentially other break downs. Did all Pilots during those years have VCM on them? Because it used to be that the 4WD ones didn't and that was a selling point for me.
I have no idea what your talking about ? :p

COACHB757:

FWD is great for areas where you get no snow plain and simple .. great on gas ..maintenance is the same as for the 4WD

4WD: is great for those areas that you have snow ... or go camping where you may need that little umph to get out of the spot .
gas mileage is great if your not a heavy foot person. I own a 2015 4WD .. no real complaints when it comes to the performance only thing i really hate myself is the amount of plastic used to make the cabin. it's pretty robust if you have kids it can take a good beating ..so i guess it's good for something . Maintenance is always key with Honda no matter what year you buy. VCM is on these Pilots but there are ways to get around it by searching the forums here ..
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
824 Posts
I have no idea what your talking about ? :p

COACHB757:

FWD is great for areas where you get no snow plain and simple .. great on gas ..maintenance is the same as for the 4WD

4WD: is great for those areas that you have snow ... or go camping where you may need that little umph to get out of the spot .
gas mileage is great if your not a heavy foot person. I own a 2015 4WD .. no real complaints when it comes to the performance only thing i really hate myself is the amount of plastic used to make the cabin. it's pretty robust if you have kids it can take a good beating ..so i guess it's good for something . Maintenance is always key with Honda no matter what year you buy. VCM is on these Pilots but there are ways to get around it by searching the forums here ..
The 2006-2008 Pilots only had VCM on the FWD versions. That is what I said in my previous comment. I also mentioned that the benefits depend on where you live (not different from what you said). Additionally I mentioned that that’s one more fluid that needs to changed.
This all makes perfect sense to me!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
379 Posts
Do you live in California or the Northeast? It's really that simple. A few miles different on mileage, but I live in NH so AWD for me! The different modes are awesome. If you're stuck in snow, go sand mode. Yeah, snow mode is for actually driving in snow, if you're stuck though, sand mode is the way to go. Just don't drive in sand mode. Plus if you plan to tow, you can tow more with AWD.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
379 Posts
Do you live in California or the Northeast? It's really that simple. A few miles different on mileage, but I live in NH so AWD for me! The different modes are awesome. If you're stuck in snow, go sand mode. Yeah, snow mode is for actually driving in snow, if you're stuck though, sand mode is the way to go. Just don't drive in sand mode. Plus if you plan to tow, you can tow more with AWD.
Sorry about the mode thing, I missed what model year you're looking at. Still a fan of awd though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
645 Posts
IMO, if you're buying a SUV like this, might as well get 4WD. Only cons are additional fluid changes (VTM-4 & transfer case), slight loss of MPG and keeping matching tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
Actually if your looking for a real 4wd SUV the PIlot is NOT the vehicle of choice ..
 
  • Like
Reactions: dr bob

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I have a 2013 with 4-wheel drive. And to call it 4WD is a bit of a farce. It's only good up to 35mph and then you have to go back to FWD. So in the snow belt, it's great for leaving everybody at the light or getting through some deep snow but other than that you can't drive down a snow covered highway at 55mph in 4WD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,561 Posts
But VTM-4 also kicks in as soon as wheel slip is detected.

Plus you've got VSA keeping you on the straight and narrow.

No substitute for attentive driving in snowy conditions, but they work "behind the scenes" to keep you going and more safely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
On a serious note anything more than 2 feet of snow the Pilot is NOT the vehicle of choice to be used ..it's a glorified make you feel warm and fuzzy soccer mom 4WD wanna B .. If Honda came out with a real truck I would be the first in line to order..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
The Pilot is about as capable in snow as anyone can expect from a large 3 row SUV. It actually gets an edge over other competitors because of its more sophisticated AWD system. Compare that with the Explorer for example which also offers an AWD system. The Pilot includes a right-left rear-wheel torque vectoring ability that the others are just catching up to. Yes, we all know a bona fide truck-based SUV with low-range 4WD gearing is the most capable in snow but if you don’t live in the Yukon or at a place where you have all year round snow, what do you want to do with a gas guzzler? The Pilot intelligently engages all the wheels WHEN it is needed and redirects its torque to the wheels with traction. I will say confidently it does a marvelous job in snow.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,555 Posts
No qualms from northern MD about really any vehicle I've had with 4WD or AWD, they all perform well in the snow. The Traverse is a little heavier and has a slightly more aggressive tire, so while it lacks the sophistication it seems to make up in brute force. But the Tcase and rear diff are tiny with very little fluid, so I wouldn't want to get them too hot from overuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
The Pilot is about as capable in snow as anyone can expect from a large 3 row SUV. It actually gets an edge over other competitors because of its more sophisticated AWD system. Compare that with the Explorer for example which also offers an AWD system. The Pilot includes a right-left rear-wheel torque vectoring ability that the others are just catching up to. Yes, we all know a bona fide truck-based SUV with low-range 4WD gearing is the most capable in snow but if you don’t live in the Yukon or at a place where you have all year round snow, what do you want to do with a gas guzzler? The Pilot intelligently engages all the wheels WHEN it is needed and redirects its torque to the wheels with traction. I will say confidently it does a marvelous job in snow.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The Key element that people tend to fail to mention also is the fact you really need a good set of tires for this system to work.. Without a good way of traction you don't have squat to work with :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,561 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,884 Posts
As much as I appreciate the intelligent AWD system in our Pilots, it's greatest value is when driving on slippery surfaces. For all but the very few with Hakkas or similar dedicated winter snow-and-ice tires, plowing through deep snow isn't a dependable ability. There just isn't enough ground clearance to get through a lot more than a foot or so without risk of high-centering. I love our Pilot for what it is, a stable bus in the winter. But we also understand its limitations.

I've had some interesting cars over the years I've had homes in snow country. At one point I had a then-new gen-1 Explorer with 4WD, and a Subaru 4WD wagon of similar vintage. The Explorer was certainly more comfortable in most driving situations, and had a decent two-channel ABS system. But in situations that included slogging through unplowed snow up to maybe 18", the Subaru was easily the better choice. Both cars had "M&S" tires. The Subaru was much lighter and certainly more 'tossable'. The Explorer advantage was ground clearance, especially with a 1" lift over stock height. These days, the Subarus are way bloated over the one we had almost thirty years ago. Much safer, more comfortable, heavier by at least another 30% I suspect.

As "smart" as the AWD Pilots are, ground clearance and common tire choices 'drive' their abilities in deep snow. To the point where if the snow is heavy and much more than six inches, I think at least twice about travelling in it at all. Powder up to a foot is painless.

In my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
The Pilot is about as capable in snow as anyone can expect from a large 3 row SUV. It actually gets an edge over other competitors because of its more sophisticated AWD system. Compare that with the Explorer for example which also offers an AWD system. The Pilot includes a right-left rear-wheel torque vectoring ability that the others are just catching up to. Yes, we all know a bona fide truck-based SUV with low-range 4WD gearing is the most capable in snow but if you don’t live in the Yukon or at a place where you have all year round snow, what do you want to do with a gas guzzler? The Pilot intelligently engages all the wheels WHEN it is needed and redirects its torque to the wheels with traction. I will say confidently it does a marvelous job in snow.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I agree 100%. I had a 1999 Nissan Pathfinder with the separate transfer case, and you could feel the load on the engine from engaging it. It got bad gas mileage even though it was stick and with 4WD only two of the wheels are actually tracking just like only one is with a FWD vehicle. With the Honda AWD, I do not know if the front wheels are posse-on-demand but the rear ones can be engaged fully or even have different amounts of torque applied per rear wheel. It is important to note that above 12 mph, the AWD Pilot is also just front wheel drive unless the computer senses it needs to engage the rear wheels to assist. Where the AWD is most helpful in non-snow-belt areas, is in towing. It will sense the need to transfer torque to the rear wheels where it has the ability to transfer up to 70% if necessary (compare towing capability and there is a significant difference between the FWD and AWD versions). The weight of the AWD system does not add too much weight and therefore the gas mileage isn't terrible over the FWD only version as Honda aimed to create a light-weight, reliable AWD system. The AWD is reliable as long as you maintain it which consists of fluid replacement when the MM tells you to. It is so good that Honda has been using the same system and tweaking it since 2000 where it was first introduced in the Acura MDX almost 20 years ago.

I used to live in NY and learned how the AWD system on my 2011 Ridgeline worked and witnessed first hand how I got into a skid and the AWD combined with the traction control, eliminated the skid and gave me control in a matter of seconds. I was blown away. Subaru's claim to taking torque from the wheels that slip to the wheels that grip happens in the transfer case. The Honda system does it in several places. One of them being the rear diff where it can control how much torque is applied to the specific wheel.

It is a very efficient, flexible and reliable system and should be able to do whatever you need it to do with the exception of hard core off roading and it does most of this automatically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Northern NJ... definitely AWD, Michelin Defender LTX M/S. Driven in some very nasty conditions. Skiing trips to Vermont in winter. Over a foot of snow in the driveway? Don't even bother shoveling, just plow over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,884 Posts
The major part of the torque vectoring in the Pilot is achieved via the ABS and VSC systems, selectively applying the brakes on individual wheels to push torque to the others to fight skids and slips. In concert with the selective-locking rear diff. it saves us from a lot of stupid stuff we get ourselves into. There are very few situations these days where a true locked rear diff and locked transfer case would do better than this AWD system. In My Casual Opinion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: plplplpl

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
The Pilot doesn't actually handle that bad in semi rough terrain ..I posted pics on the crap I drive through but like others that posted it's the ground clearance is the issue .. I got a tail pipe that looks like a swiss cheese from a rock..still trying to figure that one out ..then again it could have been worse. If there was a way to increase the lift on these pilots then It would be great .if I need to steal the suspension or what's needed from a CRV / Ridgeline so be it..Nothing is close to what I could do in my old pathfinders..and yes there was a lift kit for them ..
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top