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Discussion Starter #1
I laughed when the dealer quoted me over $200 to change my low beam and fog light bulbs in my 2012 Pilot ... even if I provided the led bulbs! Now that I realize what it takes to do the job without losing any fingers, skin or blood, I imagine the dealer got the last laugh when I told him I'd do it myself. Is Honda kidding? Remove the bumper cover and grill to replace the fog light bulbs and while you're that far, remove the top sight shield and headlight assemblies to replace the low beam bulbs … unless you're a masochist or double jointed contortionist. I realize to those of you who r&r engines and transmission, that removing a few body parts is child's play … but just to change some bulbs? Geesh. I'm dreading the day a tail light bulb burns out.
 

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The fogs are a PITA. That's why I opted to tint the lenses yellow instead of installing yellow bulbs.

The lows are easy. I slightly moved the neck of the washer fluid tank to give my fat fingers some extra space. Had to also remove the air intake snorkel, which pops right out after removing a couple of plastic push pins.
 

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It's been 2 years since I did this (upgraded to H9 bulbs initially), but I have big hands and had no issues with our '15. Usually I watch youtube videos before trying anything since it's a resource available to me, check on those because I don't remember anybody saying to remove the bumper for the low beams. For the fog lights I'd bet you can get to them by only removing the lower splash shield or removing part of the fender liner (that's how it works on my Traverse). I ended up pulling the bumper on the Pilot because I installed retrofitted headlights and XB LED fog lights at that time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The fogs are a PITA. That's why I opted to tint the lenses yellow instead of installing yellow bulbs.

The lows are easy. I slightly moved the neck of the washer fluid tank to give my fat fingers some extra space. Had to also remove the air intake snorkel, which pops right out after removing a couple of plastic push pins.
I contemplated removing the washer fluid tank and intake snorkel to get to the low beams, but since it looks like I'll be taking the bumper cover off to get to the fog lights, taking the headlight assemblies out seems a viable option. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's been 2 years since I did this (upgraded to H9 bulbs initially), but I have big hands and had no issues with our '15. Usually I watch youtube videos before trying anything since it's a resource available to me, check on those because I don't remember anybody saying to remove the bumper for the low beams. For the fog lights I'd bet you can get to them by only removing the lower splash shield or removing part of the fender liner (that's how it works on my Traverse). I ended up pulling the bumper on the Pilot because I installed retrofitted headlights and XB LED fog lights at that time.
The bumper cover removal was a suggestion to get to the fog lights, not the low beams, that I saw on YouTube. I'll look at your idea of just removing the lower splash shield or fender liners. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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I definitely was able to replace the bulbs without any major disassembly. For headlights, I recommend a stepladder. Way easier to reach in when you are higher up. For driver side light, take out two clips and remove the plastic air intake first.
For fogs, I suggest jacking the car up a bit for easier access. Undo a few clips holding the splash shield.
I highly recommend getting this:

The included tool is perfect for removing clips without damaging, and if you do damage any, you got spares.
 

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I shared some guidance a few years ago about some re-aiming efforts with the front fog lights. I since figured out that the aim is adjustable from outside the car with simple screwdriver-like tools. Thank you Workshop Manual! In the meanwhile, that old thread offers some guidance on getting to the back of the fog light assemblies for bulb changes and the like, via the lower front part of the wheelhouse liner. Link to that thread: Adjusted the Fog Lights Aim I had the car raised and front wheels off for something else, and started removing the liner clips starting at the bottom front, and only needed to go part way up in the wheelhouse before just bending the plastic liner back for access.
 

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I laughed when the dealer quoted me over $200 to change my low beam and fog light bulbs in my 2012 Pilot ... even if I provided the led bulbs! Now that I realize what it takes to do the job without losing any fingers, skin or blood, I imagine the dealer got the last laugh when I told him I'd do it myself. Is Honda kidding? Remove the bumper cover and grill to replace the fog light bulbs and while you're that far, remove the top sight shield and headlight assemblies to replace the low beam bulbs … unless you're a masochist or double jointed contortionist. I realize to those of you who r&r engines and transmission, that removing a few body parts is child's play … but just to change some bulbs? Geesh. I'm dreading the day a tail light bulb burns out.
I did both on my 2011 with no problems. Not sure of difference.
 

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The fogs are a PITA. That's why I opted to tint the lenses yellow instead of installing yellow bulbs.
So you did? Does that mean, my fellow yellow fog light aficionado, that we'll finally get to see those pics of your install?

Yellow fog light bulbs
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I definitely was able to replace the bulbs without any major disassembly. For headlights, I recommend a stepladder. Way easier to reach in when you are higher up. For driver side light, take out two clips and remove the plastic air intake first.
For fogs, I suggest jacking the car up a bit for easier access. Undo a few clips holding the splash shield.
I highly recommend getting this:

The included tool is perfect for removing clips without damaging, and if you do damage any, you got spares.
Thanks for your suggestions, but after removing the plastic air intake on the driver's side the part that it connects to is directly behind the low beam bulb and totally in the way. There is a bushed bolt that hold that part in that is inaccessible without taking off the bumper (thanks Honda). Taking off the bumper cover turned out to be a lot easier than I though it would be. So I was able to change the headlights (by removing the headlight housings which was easy) and the fog lights all at one time. While it did take time to find and undo all the fasteners, they were all easy to get out and I saved myself a lot of contortions and cuts and scrapes doing it this way. I did find a number of missing or broken fasteners, especially underneath, so I got new ones and put everything back together the way it should be.

I still contend changing those bulbs was a lot more trouble than it should have been, but it's done now and I'll admit it turned out to be less of a nightmare than I thought it would be.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I did both on my 2011 with no problems. Not sure of difference.
I didn't have any problems, mostly just fear of the unknown. There were a lot of plastic fasteners, but once I had them out along with a few #10 metric bolts and six sheet metal screws, it all came apart and back together fairly quickly. I'd say more of a tedious job than difficult or problematic. A lot of fasteners and not all the same. Keeping track of what went where was a memory challenge.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Any recommendations on brand/type of LED to convert to?
I used BeamTech bulbs for the DRLs, low beams, and fog lights. Everything went together and worked as advertised. I get much better visibility ahead at night and so far no one has flashed their brights at me. I marked the height of the low beams on the garage door before I switched to LEDs and the LEDs are at the same exact height the OEM incandescents were.

I made the mistake of ordering two of each bulb, not realizing that they give you two bulbs in each box. But they (Amazon) took all the extras back and issued me a full refund. Good price (turned out to be half of what I thought it would be), good build quality, simple installation, and so far no problems.

Note of caution: on the fog light bulbs, you'll need H11's just like the low beams, but they make H11 fog light bulbs so that's what I ordered. The H11 fog light bulbs are slightly shorter and put out less lumesns than the low beam bulbs so there might be a fitment or focus issue if you try to use low beam bulbs in the fog light housings or visa versa.
 

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I used BeamTech bulbs for the DRLs, low beams, and fog lights. Everything went together and worked as advertised. I get much better visibility ahead at night and so far no one has flashed their brights at me. I marked the height of the low beams on the garage door before I switched to LEDs and the LEDs are at the same exact height the OEM incandescents were.

I made the mistake of ordering two of each bulb, not realizing that they give you two bulbs in each box. But they (Amazon) took all the extras back and issued me a full refund. Good price (turned out to be half of what I thought it would be), good build quality, simple installation, and so far no problems.

Note of caution: on the fog light bulbs, you'll need H11's just like the low beams, but they make H11 fog light bulbs so that's what I ordered. The H11 fog light bulbs are slightly shorter and put out less lumesns than the low beam bulbs so there might be a fitment or focus issue if you try to use low beam bulbs in the fog light housings or visa versa.
Thanks! I ended up going with cougar motor leds for all 3 (Amazon... they had good reviews online and on amazon) the fog lights were actually pretty easy, 3 screws and a bolt on the tire well and boom done. I liked them so much better for visibility, that I ordered them for my elderly mom's 2011 CRV, I drive her car to take her places because she can’t get in my pilot (too high) the CRV ended up being a pain in the butt due to the rubber seal, I just made a couple of slits to fit the fan and motor through and they work great. I’m thinking of converting all the lights in my pilot to LEDs just for the crisp light they give off, but I really don’t want to mess with the resistors and what not.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I imagine the difficulty in changing over from incandescent to led varies by auto manufacturer and which bulb(s) are involved. AFAIK, the resistors, if there are any, are internal to the bulb assembly for the ones I switched to leds.

I'm seeing more and more vehicles with aftermarket led headlights and older incandescent fog, DRLs, parking, and turn signal lights. I guess it's just not worth the effort (or cost) to have them all match. (although some people might purposely leave their foglights a warmer color)
 
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