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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know or have access to the parts diagram for a 2017 Honda Pilot EX-L ?

A few years back I installed aftermarket LED fog light bulbs and I went to install new ones today because I noticed one of the filaments burnt out.

When I removed the harness from the bulb I noticed once of the prongs got corroded and is stuck in the stock OEM connector.

See photos

Is there a trick to removing that prong, or how can I order just the green connector to splice or repair it?

Obviously I don’t want to replace the entire harness for just a corroded connector.





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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What’s the best way to connect to the OEM harness.

I have zero soldering skills so would a T-tap connector work or what’s the best way to attach this ?


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Butt connectors is an alternative but I would practice on some spare wires to improve soldering skills. Either way you decide to make the connection use shrink wrap (preferred) or liquid tape (great too) or black electrical tape to prevent future corrosion. All these supplies and more are available at local Harbor Freight or Walmart.
 

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Definitely soldier the wires and use heat shrink.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So I just need to connect two wires on the OEM harness to another two wires on the fog light connector.

I don’t own a solder gun nor a heat gun.

Are there any other options?

I’d hate to invest a ton of money on supplies when I have such a simple repair, and I’ll likely never need to use the tools again


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So I just need to connect two wires on the OEM harness to another two wires on the fog light connector.
Yes. Make sure the wires are soldered on in the correct configuration. It's 2 wires, so it's a 50/50 chance of connecting them right or wrong. Examine the wires of the old connector before cutting to determine which wires should be soldered together.
I don’t own a solder gun nor a heat gun.

I’d hate to invest a ton of money on supplies when I have such a simple repair, and I’ll likely never need to use the tools again
As mentioned, Harbor Freight is a great place for these supplies.
The problem with not soldering the conection is that in time these can begin to corrode as it is exposed to moisture. The corrosion can travel up through the wire. If done like the video, it will prevent this.
Are there any other options?
Ya, you could twist the wires together and wrap each one with electrical tape and worry with any negative result of it later, that may or may not ever occur.
 
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Would something like this work also? I found it on Amazon

NEWACALOX Soldering Gun Automatic Hand-held Solder Iron Kit Welding Tool with Lead-free Wire, Desoldering Pump, Tweezers for Circuit Board, Home DIY, Electronic Repair
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HQHXB8...abc_MN2DS7S0MFY2V5SSZJJM?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1


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I dont see why not. Heat the wire first before feeding the solder. This kit is using lead free solder which is a little harder to work with (not a deal breaker). I'd get some soldering flux paste and coat the wires 1st to help the hot solder to flow through the wire.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I can search for a kit with leaded solder

Also explain the heat shrink tubes

Are those needed after I solder? I would assume I would need to protect the bare wire somehow that I just soldered. Which means I need a heat gun?

Sorry for all the dumb questions I’m obviously a newbie at this


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I can search for a kit with leaded solder

Also explain the heat shrink tubes

Are those needed after I solder? I would assume I would need to protect the bare wire somehow that I just soldered. Which means I need a heat gun?
The heat shrink is slipped over the wire before twisting wire together before soldering. The heat shrink needs to be back far enough away from the solder job so the hot wire doesn't cause it to shrink before it's in place. Yes, as the video shows, when the wire cools, slide the heat shrink over the bare wire. A lighter will also work. Just be careful not to melt it. Roll the wire heating the heat shrink evenly all around. Make sure your heat shrink is long enough to cover your repair, leaving at least a 1/2 on each side. If you drive on salted roads, the dielectric grease would be a good idea, as the video shows.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I figure I would need practice.

The video shows the solder gun making direct contact with the copper strands and then wetting the solder onto the wires.

I’m also seeing those automatic solder guns that auto dispense “drops” of solder but I’m guessing those are more for circuit boards? Since I’m assuming you would get cold solders if I were to just drop beads of solder on the wire strands versus getting those strands hot and applying solder directly to them


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I figure I would need practice.

The video shows the solder gun making direct contact with the copper strands and then wetting the solder onto the wires.

I’m also seeing those automatic solder guns that auto dispense “drops” of solder but I’m guessing those are more for circuit boards? Since I’m assuming you would get cold solders if I were to just drop beads of solder on the wire strands versus getting those strands hot and applying solder directly to them


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Correct, but I wouldn't say it wouldn't couldn't work if the copper wire was heated and with flux paste.
 

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I’m also seeing those automatic solder guns that auto dispense “drops” of solder but I’m guessing those are more for circuit boards? Since I’m assuming you would get cold solders if I were to just drop beads of solder on the wire strands versus getting those strands hot and applying solder directly to them
No need for that fancy auto drip stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Correct, but I wouldn't say it wouldn't couldn't work if the copper wire was heated and with flux paste.
So I’m working in a tight space as you can see from the original photo. I have to pull back the inner fender just to access the harness. The video is nice because the guy has an alligator clip stand and everything where it’s easy to use two hands. But I won’t have that luxury.

I’m just wondering how easy it’s going to be to working in that space which is the only reason that auto solder gun caught my attention since I could hold the harness wires in one hand and solder using the other.

Unless I’m just going to have to deal with a hanging harness as I’m soldering (I won’t be able to support it since one hand will have the solder gun and the other will be the solder wick I’m applying)


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So I’m working in a tight space as you can see from the original photo. I have to pull back the inner fender just to access the harness. The video is nice because the guy has an alligator clip stand and everything where it’s easy to use two hands. But I won’t have that luxury.

I’m just wondering how easy it’s going to be to working in that space which is the only reason that auto solder gun caught my attention since I could hold the harness wires in one hand and solder using the other.

Unless I’m just going to have to deal with a hanging harness as I’m soldering (I won’t be able to support it since one hand will have the solder gun and the other will be the solder wick I’m applying)


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Very true. I've had to solder looking up under the dash, sometimes it doesn't turn out as pretty like the video. Main point is a solid connection that can be covered by heat shrink. The flux paste can help a lot. It helps the solder travel through the strands of wires.
 
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