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Remember, any tire sold has to meet DOT specs. So in reality, besides advertising all tires are the same.
Yes to a minimum test standard, but not all tires are created equal. Also comparing one set of tires to another brand isn't quite the same. Better test would be comparing the performance of a 3yr old tire to the same 6yr with the same treadwear amounts, compounds, etc. Sure Michelin and a lot of other big brands advertising costs account for a portion of their tire's prices, but also tire compounds, and tread designs have come a long way over the last 20 years (a benefit of R&D, and the wonderful world of fluid simulations). Like little channels that open up as the tire wears down, to help disperse water out the sides better.

Per (Uniform Tire Quality Grading) - "Traction Grades are based on the tire's straight line wet coefficient of traction as the tire skids across the specified test surfaces. The UTQG traction test does not evaluate dry braking, dry cornering, wet cornering, or high speed hydroplaning resistance. The Traction Grade is determined by installing properly inflated test tires on the instrumented axle of a "skid trailer." The skid trailer is pulled behind a truck at a constant 40 mph over wet asphalt and wet concrete test surfaces. Its brakes are momentarily locked and the axle sensors measure the tire's coefficient of friction (braking g forces) as it slides. Since this test evaluates a sliding tire at a constant 40 mph, it places more emphasis on the tire's tread compound and less emphasis on its tread design. "

For Traction of current tires in production:
  • 3% are rated “AA”
  • 75% are rated “A”
  • 22% are rated “B”
  • only 1 line of tires rated “C”
For Temperature, "Temperature Grade indicates the extent to which heat is generated and/or dissipated by a tire. If the tire is unable to dissipate the heat effectively or if the tire is unable to resist the destructive effects of heat buildup, its ability to run at high speeds is reduced. The grade is established by measuring a loaded tire's ability to operate at high speeds without failure by running an inflated test tire against a large diameter high-speed laboratory test wheel. "

"A" is over 115mph
"B" between 100 and 115
"C" Between 85 and 100

"Every tire sold in the United States must be capable of earning a "C" rating which indicates the ability to withstand 85 mph speeds. "

As for the Treadwear Grades "are based on actual road use in which the test tire is run in a vehicle convoy along with standardized Course Monitoring Tires. The vehicle repeatedly runs a prescribed 400-mile test loop in West Texas for a total of 7,200 miles. The vehicle can have its alignment set, air pressure checked and tires rotated every 800 miles. The test tire's and the Monitoring Tire's wear are measured during and at the conclusion of the test. The tire manufacturers then assign a Treadwear Grade based on the observed wear rates. The Course Monitoring Tire is assigned a grade and the test tire receives a grade indicating its relative treadwear. A grade of 100 would indicate that the tire tread would last as long as the test tire, 200 would indicate the tread would last twice as long, 300 would indicate three times as long, etc. "

So really, the only thing the DOT appears to care about is that Tires can withstand the 85mph speed test 🤣.

On another note, when I lived back up in Seattle, the Les Schwab offers a Tire Siping service that actually does help with traction a noticeable amount. Surprised I don't see the service at other retailers, nice item they could use to increase revenue, and offer the customer improved durability and traction.
 

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Yes to a minimum test standard, but not all tires are created equal. Also comparing one set of tires to another brand isn't quite the same. Better test would be comparing the performance of a 3yr old tire to the same 6yr with the same treadwear amounts, compounds, etc. Sure Michelin and a lot of other big brands advertising costs account for a portion of their tire's prices, but also tire compounds, and tread designs have come a long way over the last 20 years (a benefit of R&D, and the wonderful world of fluid simulations). Like little channels that open up as the tire wears down, to help disperse water out the sides better.

Per (Uniform Tire Quality Grading) - "Traction Grades are based on the tire's straight line wet coefficient of traction as the tire skids across the specified test surfaces. The UTQG traction test does not evaluate dry braking, dry cornering, wet cornering, or high speed hydroplaning resistance. The Traction Grade is determined by installing properly inflated test tires on the instrumented axle of a "skid trailer." The skid trailer is pulled behind a truck at a constant 40 mph over wet asphalt and wet concrete test surfaces. Its brakes are momentarily locked and the axle sensors measure the tire's coefficient of friction (braking g forces) as it slides. Since this test evaluates a sliding tire at a constant 40 mph, it places more emphasis on the tire's tread compound and less emphasis on its tread design. "

For Traction of current tires in production:
  • 3% are rated “AA”
  • 75% are rated “A”
  • 22% are rated “B”
  • only 1 line of tires rated “C”
For Temperature, "Temperature Grade indicates the extent to which heat is generated and/or dissipated by a tire. If the tire is unable to dissipate the heat effectively or if the tire is unable to resist the destructive effects of heat buildup, its ability to run at high speeds is reduced. The grade is established by measuring a loaded tire's ability to operate at high speeds without failure by running an inflated test tire against a large diameter high-speed laboratory test wheel. "

"A" is over 115mph
"B" between 100 and 115
"C" Between 85 and 100

"Every tire sold in the United States must be capable of earning a "C" rating which indicates the ability to withstand 85 mph speeds. "

As for the Treadwear Grades "are based on actual road use in which the test tire is run in a vehicle convoy along with standardized Course Monitoring Tires. The vehicle repeatedly runs a prescribed 400-mile test loop in West Texas for a total of 7,200 miles. The vehicle can have its alignment set, air pressure checked and tires rotated every 800 miles. The test tire's and the Monitoring Tire's wear are measured during and at the conclusion of the test. The tire manufacturers then assign a Treadwear Grade based on the observed wear rates. The Course Monitoring Tire is assigned a grade and the test tire receives a grade indicating its relative treadwear. A grade of 100 would indicate that the tire tread would last as long as the test tire, 200 would indicate the tread would last twice as long, 300 would indicate three times as long, etc. "

So really, the only thing the DOT appears to care about is that Tires can withstand the 85mph speed test 🤣.

On another note, when I lived back up in Seattle, the Les Schwab offers a Tire Siping service that actually does help with traction a noticeable amount. Surprised I don't see the service at other retailers, nice item they could use to increase revenue, and offer the customer improved durability and traction.
Let us say you are running a fleet of 50 light trucks with LT225/75R16 10 Ply
Michelin LTX run about 180 each. Offshore run about 110 each.
180x 6 is 1080. 110x 6 is 660.
54000 compared to 33000
You have employees that dont give a crap what they drive over, so they seem to wreck tires. Maybe just to have
an extra coffee break waiting for a tire guy to come.
They average about the same mileage before they are replaced. So it is a win win to go with offshore.
Name brand tires are built in Mexico, USA, Canada, Thailand. Offshore are China .
If you are running a fleet, which would you buy. They perform the same, wear the same.
North American quality is no better, sometimes worse.
 

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Why can't everybody just put whatever tire they want on their car. I don't care what you use and you don't care what I use? Why is it such a contentious topic?
It's not really putting others at risk. People in TX don't have the same needs as someone in PA. It's like asking which oil is best. It all does the same thing, just a little different. Everyone has their own very strong opinion.

What if there was a thread where people could "review" their tires and include location, driving style and how many miles they've driven. Otherwise, any other info is completely worthless.
 

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Why can't everybody just put whatever tire they want on their car. I don't care what you use and you don't care what I use? Why is it such a contentious topic?
It's not really putting others at risk. People in TX don't have the same needs as someone in PA. It's like asking which oil is best. It all does the same thing, just a little different. Everyone has their own very strong opinion.

What if there was a thread where people could "review" their tires and include location, driving style and how many miles they've driven. Otherwise, any other info is completely worthless.
Answer is, the forums would be empty. This topic gives us all a chance to express our recommendations, without paying the bill, lol
 

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In my wallet, I would trust my 3 year old condom, more than I would I trust my six year old condom.
Whether 6 years or 3 years, if you haven't taken them out for a test ride yet, time to face the truth that it ain't just your rubber that ain't up to the task. Other mechanical parts are likely broken down and it's time to give up your license. :p
 

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Whether 6 years or 3 years, if you haven't taken them out for a test ride yet, time to face the truth that it ain't just your rubber that ain't up to the task. Other mechanical parts are likely broken down and it's time to give up your license. :p
The good old days of worrying about condoms, to be a young buck again. lol
 

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Do you know why the green stripe is painted the tread.
I would just assume for factory identification use?
 
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Or it's because it's claiming to be good for the environment, somehow? :p
 

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Made it a lot easier when they delivered tires, when you have five hundred tires come in, it is nice to just separate them by the the stripes instead of trying to read the sizes.
 

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One big rust issue that affects many Pilots in the rust belt is the rusty rear impact bumper that is replaceable. Not as catastrophic as rear unibody sub structure rust but is an area to observe for progression. The only thing amusing is the rusty potato chips I leave behind wherever I park. First pic courtesy of @andywatson that says it all :D
0F9C8890-2028-4EDD-9A6E-B897CB68260E.jpeg
4524C87C-BC47-4B59-9CA8-B173324150E5.jpeg
 

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Looking for one in Canada that isn't outrageously priced, or one from the US where shipping isn't the killer.

Mine's OK for now, but I like to plan for contingencies.
 
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