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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tried to apply a new serpentine belt when I lost tension. I looked down and I saw the bolt hanging out of the tensioner. Upon inspection it's clear that the broken bolt is still in the block. Has anyone experienced this and where you able to extract the broken bolt? Please advise on what I need to buy to get the bolt out of the thread hole. Thank so much for your help.
 

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Tried to apply a new serpentine belt when I lost tension. I looked down and I saw the bolt hanging out of the tensioner. Upon inspection it's clear that the broken bolt is still in the block. Has anyone experienced this and where you able to extract the broken bolt? Please advise on what I need to buy to get the bolt out of the thread hole. Thank so much for your help.
Is there any of the bolt sticking out so a nut could be welded to it?
 

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It doesn't appear to be plus welding is out of scope for me.
I'm sure there are some experienced Piloteer that will share what the know on how to drill and tap a broken bolt.
You might also check YouTube.
Really sorry for your pain.
 
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Careful with trying to drill / tap / extract. It's easy to mess that up and make things worse - sadly I'm painfully too familiar. If you can't get anything to grip it, I'd be tempted to have it towed to a competent shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Careful with trying to drill / tap / extract. It's easy to mess that up and make things worse - sadly I'm painfully too familiar. If you can't get anything to grip it, I'd be tempted to have it towed to a competent shop.
Sorry to hear that. Based on your comment, do you recall the tools you used?
 

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Sorry to hear that. Based on your comment, do you recall the tools you used?
A drill bit to drill in then a reverse extractor deal / ez out. It broke off and got stuck in there too. It's still occupying one of the ~30 oil pan bolts on my 330i. Utter failure and missing one bolt on the oil pan thankfully has yielded no leaks. Freaking one time use aluminum bolts - 7 ft lbs then something like 90 degrees. If you turn too fast on the angle they'll snap in a heartbeat. ARGH!!!!

Tips if you're going to take it out yourself:

1) Don't get in a hurry.

2) Pray it's in a reasonably accessible area

3) Don't think you can fix it quickly at 1am while wanting to finish the job. You can't.

4) Don't use a drill

5) Sometimes it's worth paying someone to fix your mistakes.

Legit probably my biggest DIY failure ever, try not to laugh... I know I was dumb... and yes if you could see the oil pan (you can't cause you have to drop the subframe to get to it) this is what you'd see today:

141602



Word to the wise - don't be like me.
 

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That broken bolt is such a teaser. Tackled plenty of broken bolts and weld-nuts on my ‘04 Pilot and each break seems to be unique and needs a different plan of attack. Got a lucky break (pun intended) yesterday. While gently loosening a caliper bolt last night I heard a loud knuckle cracking sound. To my surprise the bolt came out by hand. Upon closer inspection I saw a faint twist & fracture that I was able to break in half with my fingers....rare to get a lucky break ;)
 

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I'm sure there are some experienced Piloteer that will share what the know on how to drill and tap a broken bolt
My friendly tip is to apply a dab of anti seize on nearly any replacement bolt no matter what if you live in the rust belt. The broken bolt/nut story always brings out my cussing demeanor. I hope not to experience another broken bolt/nut anytime soon.
 

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My friendly tip is to apply a dab of anti seize on nearly any replacement bolt no matter what if you live in the rust belt. The broken bolt/nut story always brings out my cussing demeanor. I hope not to experience another broken bolt/nut anytime soon.
Yep, I dodged a big one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A drill bit to drill in then a reverse extractor deal / ez out. It broke off and got stuck in there too. It's still occupying one of the ~30 oil pan bolts on my 330i. Utter failure and missing one bolt on the oil pan thankfully has yielded no leaks. Freaking one time use aluminum bolts - 7 ft lbs then something like 90 degrees. If you turn too fast on the angle they'll snap in a heartbeat. ARGH!!!!

Tips if you're going to take it out yourself:

1) Don't get in a hurry.

2) Pray it's in a reasonably accessible area

3) Don't think you can fix it quickly at 1am while wanting to finish the job. You can't.

4) Don't use a drill

5) Sometimes it's worth paying someone to fix your mistakes.

Legit probably my biggest DIY failure ever, try not to laugh... I know I was dumb... and yes if you could see the oil pan (you can't cause you have to drop the subframe to get to it) this is what you'd see today:

View attachment 141602


Word to the wise - don't be like me.
A drill bit to drill in then a reverse extractor deal / ez out. It broke off and got stuck in there too. It's still occupying one of the ~30 oil pan bolts on my 330i. Utter failure and missing one bolt on the oil pan thankfully has yielded no leaks. Freaking one time use aluminum bolts - 7 ft lbs then something like 90 degrees. If you turn too fast on the angle they'll snap in a heartbeat. ARGH!!!!

Tips if you're going to take it out yourself:

1) Don't get in a hurry.

2) Pray it's in a reasonably accessible area

3) Don't think you can fix it quickly at 1am while wanting to finish the job. You can't.

4) Don't use a drill

5) Sometimes it's worth paying someone to fix your mistakes.

Legit probably my biggest DIY failure ever, try not to laugh... I know I was dumb... and yes if you could see the oil pan (you can't cause you have to drop the subframe to get to it) this is what you'd see today:

View attachment 141602


Word to the wise - don't be like me.
Brian I am definitely not laughing, there's pain in my face when I look at that picture. Gonna do my best to be methodical. Thanks for replying!
 

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That broken bolt is such a teaser. Tackled plenty of broken bolts and weld-nuts on my ‘04 Pilot and each break seems to be unique and needs a different plan of attack. Got a lucky break (pun intended) yesterday. While gently loosening a caliper bolt last night I heard a loud knuckle cracking sound. To my surprise the bolt came out by hand. Upon closer inspection I saw a faint twist & fracture that I was able to break in half with my fingers....rare to get a lucky break ;)
Yep - and I've removed some before. Usually if you get the tension off they'll come out OK. These alluminum one time use bolts just didn't here. What I should have done is removed the oil pan again, but the problem was that I was using one time use bolts and 27 out of ~30 had already been torqued properly and I didn't have another set. It also happened to be in the hardest to access spot under there between where the engine mount attach points come down, the oil separator connector comes up off the oil pan, and the side of the oil pan were all right there. Ultimately leaving it alone hasn't hurt me in 1 1/2 years so... I guess it's good. The first oil pan gasket lasted 12 years before it started leaking hopefully I get a while from this one. Just annoying cause I knew better and wouldn't have happened if I'd got just a little slower - both in installing and trying to get it out. Dumb mistake on my part.


Brian I am definitely not laughing, there's pain in my face when I look at that picture. Gonna do my best to be methodical. Thanks for replying!
The best news is that the picture I took is the only evidence that it's there. I can't see it and be reminded of it during normal maintenance. :)
 
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Please advise on what I need to buy to get the bolt out of the thread hole.
OK, this isn't rocket science, but I'm voting the other way.

Since you have (1) never done it before and (2) have a location-critical part that uses a non-standard bolt that is (3) in a spot that's hard to get to and see what you're doing, what you need to buy is a professional's experience. If you have tow coverage on your insurance, it's a no-brainer. If you wreck these threads, it's going to cost a lot to get going again.

Don't get me wrong - I'm all-in on what you can learn to do from a few YouTube videos, but if this happened to me today, I would only consider DIY if I could rent an indoor workspace with lots of light and dedicate a day to going really slowly. By the time I bought a good extractor set on top of that, it's not going to be cost effective. This just isn't a good scenario for learning a new skill.
 

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This won't help the OP with their problem, but I was talking to a machinist friend about this problem today and learned a few thing that others might find interesting:

1. "Best Practice" for a bolt that is laterally loaded (like the one that holds the tensioner assembly onto the block) is to ensure that the unthreaded shoulder of the bolt is supported by at least .25" in the hole. In other words, the unthreaded part of the bolt must go below the surface. If not, the small diameter of the threads is all you get for strength.

2. Since I don't think the Pilot works like this (and even if it is, we're dealing with high-mileage vehicles), best practices with both tensioner bolts would be:

  • replace, don't re-use old bolts
  • always torque to spec
  • if applicable (2003's, for sure), be careful not to over-tension the belt on installation
 

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In other words, the unthreaded part of the bolt must go below the surface.
Correct. Not the case here. Threads begin entering the block. Though OP has not provided a photo, it sounds like its sheared off nearly flush.
 

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OK, this isn't rocket science, but I'm voting the other way.

Since you have (1) never done it before and (2) have a location-critical part that uses a non-standard bolt that is (3) in a spot that's hard to get to and see what you're doing, what you need to buy is a professional's experience. If you have tow coverage on your insurance, it's a no-brainer. If you wreck these threads, it's going to cost a lot to get going again.

Don't get me wrong - I'm all-in on what you can learn to do from a few YouTube videos, but if this happened to me today, I would only consider DIY if I could rent an indoor workspace with lots of light and dedicate a day to going really slowly. By the time I bought a good extractor set on top of that, it's not going to be cost effective. This just isn't a good scenario for learning a new skill.
Sometimes it is worth to send to a professional. I broke a stud off in the cylinder head of my triumph. Drilled and used an easy out. It snapped. After hours of frustration, finally brought it to a machine shop. He was a bit pissy about the easy out, made his job a bit harder. He had it out in 15 minutes, and re-tapped the thread.
Should have saved my time and headache.
And my wallet was only $30.00 lighter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Correct. Not the case here. Threads begin entering the block. Though OP has not provided a photo, it sounds like its sheared off nearly flush.
Been very busy with work so I will be posting the sheered bolt very soon. I just don't know when I'll get to the tensioner to provide a pic. Thank you all for your input, I'll keep you posted.
 

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As others pointed out ez out works well, but there is a risk of making it worse, if you break the hardened extractor too. I’ve used it successfully on a motorcycle engine block, where I had plenty of clearance.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Been very busy with work so I will be posting the sheered bolt very soon. I just don't know when I'll get to the tensioner to provide a pic. Thank you all for your input, I'll keep you posted.
Sheered bolt and what's stuck in the bracket:

IMG_20201129_150006500.jpg

IMG_20201129_150027741.jpg
 
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