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Guys I bought a 2008 Pilot in 2018, it was at 230,000 kms i have put in another 10,000, I want to keep the vehicle for another 4-5 years by putting in an average 10,000 kms/year on it.

But most recently the starter died in a parking lot so I had to get it towed and changed, and then yesterday the battery icon lit up , I have taken it to my mechanic and asked him what preventative maintenance i need to get done because I don't want to keep on getting these issues one after the other.

A list of things he has submitted to be fixed are
a) Replacement of alternator
b) Timing belt and water pump
c)Transmission fluid flush
d)Front differential
e) Rear differential fluid
f) rear pads and rotors
g) front rotors
h) brake fluid flush
i)engine air filter
j) cabin filter
k) flex pipe repairing

All in I am looking at about 3k CAD bills.

If this ensures that I can run the vehicle trouble free for the next 4-5 years of regular maintenance, i would like to do it, but would appreciate any input if it is worth doing it, or do i cut my losses and sell off the vehicle.
 

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Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
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Welcome to the forum. The list of maintenance items your mechanic gave you seems fair given the age and mileage of your Pilot. Timing belt is due roughly every 7 years /105k miles so check the last time it was done.

As with any high mileage vehicle, you could sink a bunch of money into maintenance then have something else fail a few months down the line. There are no guarantees these will be the only items which need to be addressed over the next few years.

With vehicles more than 10 years old it becomes a lot more difficult to decide to keep it or dump it if you’re paying someone to do the work. If you can do some of the work yourself then you’re only out the cost of parts and your time. Based on your list if you’re slightly mechanically inclined you could perform half the items yourself.

One last thing, Honda does not recommend flushing a transmission. 3x drain and fill, driving a few miles between each drain and fill, is a Honda tranny flush.
 

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Lot of the repair items listed would apply to any similar high mileage AWD vehicle and are not necessarily unique to the Pilot. Focus on the more immediate urgent items and plan on tackling the rest accordingly. Assuming the motor, trans are functioning well and the body is relatively intact and rust-free I would invest in that vehicle.
 

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Guys I bought a 2008 Pilot in 2018, it was at 230,000 kms i have put in another 10,000, I want to keep the vehicle for another 4-5 years by putting in an average 10,000 kms/year on it.

But most recently the starter died in a parking lot so I had to get it towed and changed, and then yesterday the battery icon lit up , I have taken it to my mechanic and asked him what preventative maintenance i need to get done because I don't want to keep on getting these issues one after the other.

A list of things he has submitted to be fixed are
a) Replacement of alternator
b) Timing belt and water pump
c)Transmission fluid flush
d)Front differential
e) Rear differential fluid
f) rear pads and rotors
g) front rotors
h) brake fluid flush
i)engine air filter
j) cabin filter
k) flex pipe repairing

All in I am looking at about 3k CAD bills.

If this ensures that I can run the vehicle trouble free for the next 4-5 years of regular maintenance, i would like to do it, but would appreciate any input if it is worth doing it, or do i cut my losses and sell off the vehicle.
You could do everything at once and tomorrow be involved in an accident that totals the vehicle.
Then you're out the $3K you just spent.

A failed timing belt can ruin the engine, so that's important if it's due.
If the flex pipe is broken, that should be fixed soon and isn't expensive.
Have the alternator replaced if it tests bad.

Fluid and filter changes are scheduled maintenance items.
Are you following the maintenance minder?

Do the brakes when they wear out.

Have the spark plugs ever been replaced and/or the valve clearance adjusted?

Shocks, wheel bearings and CV joints/axles are other parts that can fail/wear out.
You could try to be proactive with those items, too - or just wait until they need to be replaced.
 

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If the flex pipe is broken, that should be fixed soon and isn't expensive.
OP...find a competent muffler shop that can either do the repair competently or consider a new front pipe from Walker or Bosal. Leaky flex pipe will allow exhaust fumes to enter into the cabin. A half-ass repair looks like this:
Automotive exhaust Auto part Exhaust manifold Pipe Metal
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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A reasonable list and all great advice above, but maybe shop around for trusted mechanics and you may be able to get all that done for less money. $3k is not crazy expensive, but seems a little on the high side.
 

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Guys I bought a 2008 Pilot in 2018, it was at 230,000 kms i have put in another 10,000, I want to keep the vehicle for another 4-5 years by putting in an average 10,000 kms/year on it.

But most recently the starter died in a parking lot so I had to get it towed and changed, and then yesterday the battery icon lit up , I have taken it to my mechanic and asked him what preventative maintenance i need to get done because I don't want to keep on getting these issues one after the other.

A list of things he has submitted to be fixed are
a) Replacement of alternator
b) Timing belt and water pump
c)Transmission fluid flush
d)Front differential
e) Rear differential fluid
f) rear pads and rotors
g) front rotors
h) brake fluid flush
i)engine air filter
j) cabin filter
k) flex pipe repairing

All in I am looking at about 3k CAD bills.

If this ensures that I can run the vehicle trouble free for the next 4-5 years of regular maintenance, i would like to do it, but would appreciate any input if it is worth doing it, or do i cut my losses and sell off the vehicle.
Honda factory has inspectors that double check the quality of work done by the people that built your Pilot. The repair shop does not have anyone to check his work except you. Also, it isn't factory clean and new anymore. Don't expect repairs be done to the same quality.

On my 2008 Pilot we pushed the timing belt and water pump replacement out to 100,000 miles. They were working perfectly at the time of replacement and showing no obvious signs of wear. Even the bearings were still silky smooth with no play. But that is no guarantee that they will stay that way. The dealership did the late scheduled maintenance job and caused all sorts of additional problems; damaging A/C compressor, breaking and not replacing clips and plastic parts, missing bolts. This is a tough one to decide on. I would want to see the toolbox and meet the mechanic actually doing the work before trusting them to this job. If he cannot keep himself and his tools in order, he probably won't take great care with your Pilot.

Likewise, the dealership did scheduled tranny flush on a perfectly functioning vehicle and introduced some lag when shifting. Drain and refill only, do not flush. If the tranny is working fine, then any potentially harmful stuff inside has embedded itself in gunk out of the way of working bits. A flush dislodges that 'protective gunk' and any that does not find its way to the drain is newly circulated through your transmission.

As soon as the cabin air filter was replaced on schedule, the perfectly functioning system acquired a mildew smell that never fully went away. If you don't have a problem with it, leave it alone.

Engine air, oil, other filters are a different story. They are good cheap insurance to be replaced on schedule or whenever it is convenient due to another job nearby, also relatively easy DIY jobs.

We have found that the main positive battery cable running from battery to starter is prone to internal corrosion into the center of the cable far up under the insulation, which increases its resistance. Our 2nd is due to be replaced soon but mechanics aren't likely to point it out because it is not plainly visible, also its a tough job that doesn't pay much flat rate. Possibly related, our alternator voltage runs a bit high, around 15.6 volts but has never failed. That might be causing increased battery gassing. We've been through 3 batteries, each taken out by kids in the back playing with the dome light. Don't just replace the alternator unless it has a broken case that cannot be fixed. Local starter alternator shops are struggling to stay afloat and they can usually replace bearings and diode packs quickly and do a better job than mass remanufacturers without shipping and core charges. They also know more about these systems in your vehicle than a general mechanic. You might ask them to custom make a new positive battery to starter cable out of slightly better cable and put on new terminals. It will be cheaper than the Honda cable and have more copper and less plastic. There are some cam lock no tool battery terminals now that are really solid and convenient. Or the nice chunky gold plated car audio type battery terminals with grub screws for adding aftermarket loads.

Differential fluid is a good DIY for cheap thing, and as long as there is some in there(no leaks or contamination), not likely to cause problems if you decide to forgo it a bit longer. If you do have any differential issues now, fluid wont fix it, don't bother. A bad diff can still survive a long time. Cheapest fix is probably a complete junkyard swap. Put the new oil in at the swap, Differential fluid is one of the most common items a dishonest mechanic charges for but never performs.

Any time you resurface or replace rotors, also get new pads, even if the old pads are still good thickness. Putting used pads on a new rotor surface will wear down the new flat rotor to match the contours of the old pad. That shortens mileage of your new rotor and ensures more material will need to be removed to get back to flat at your next rotor resurfacing. Because you said front rotors, but not front pads, I'm assuming they measured the rotors and they are below minimum thickness. That means they are not allowed to resurface them, it does not mean they are unsafe. You can continue driving on below minimum thickness rotors until the current pads wear out. At that time, perhaps several thousand miles down the road, get new rotor and new pads.

Absolutely get the flex pipe fixed.
 
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