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Banned from wife鈥檚 2005 Pilot LX
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For those of you with teenagers to 30 year old youngsters, please encourage them to work hard so there will still be 馃挵 in the SS coffers when it鈥檚 my turn to retire. I don鈥檛 want to 馃サ only to find out all the money 馃捀 away.
 
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"A 2019 is still very new. Unless the Pilot has braking issues, I would wait until time to replace brake pads to flush."

It's a 2008 he purchased in 2019
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Thank you all for the feedback, I asked a few mechanics and it's around $100 to do the bleeding! no thank you.
I'll do the following which worked for many, but let me know if it's a good idea:

I'll ride for around 1000-2000 miles and then I'll replace again the brake fluid in the reservoir, a lot of ppl noticed that after they changed the fluid in the reservoir and ride for a few hundred miles that it turned darker as before so it mixes after a while. I'll do the same for the steering wheel fluid which I changed a few days ago but probably I'll do it after a few weeks between exchanges.
 

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Thank you all for the feedback, I asked a few mechanics and it's around $100 to do the bleeding! no thank you.
I'll do the following which worked for many, but let me know if it's a good idea:

I'll ride for around 1000-2000 miles and then I'll replace again the brake fluid in the reservoir, a lot of ppl noticed that after they changed the fluid in the reservoir and ride for a few hundred miles that it turned darker as before so it mixes after a while. I'll do the same for the steering wheel fluid which I changed a few days ago but probably I'll do it after a few weeks between exchanges.
Bleeding the brakes is cheap and easy. You can even do it your self w/o a helper to push on the brake pedal.

I use a 'box end' wrench 8mm? Put it on the Zert/bleeder fitting.
Put a hose on the nipple. Clear is better b/c you can then see the air/ color of the fluid being 'bled'.
Clear is new-er. The darker it is, the more moisture in it. Brake fluid is extremely hydrophllic!
Open the nipple 1/4 to 1/2 turn with the hose on it.
have the other end of the hose at the bottom or a catch bottle.- SO AIR WON'T GET BACK IN.
Have your helper push and to the floor many time on each wheel cylinder/caliper; or, get in and do it your self. As long as you keep some fluid in the reservoir up top- it won't suck air in!
So after you or a helper put the brake pedal to the floor ( for some reason I use 7 times to the floor on each wheel), then tighten the zert/nipple while the hose is attached.- so no air gets in.

Honda says it's best to do it in the order left front, right front, right rear, left rear.
I don't think it makes much difference.

After you're done the fluid should be much clearer (don't forget to keep adding fluid as you bleed it out) and the pedal should be firm on the first push with the zerts all closed.

Good luck! You CAN do this, in an apartment parking lot, w/o taking any wheels off, and without jacking up the Pilot! You can do it!
 

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Thank you all for the feedback, I asked a few mechanics and it's around $100 to do the bleeding! no thank you.
I'll do the following which worked for many, but let me know if it's a good idea:

I'll ride for around 1000-2000 miles and then I'll replace again the brake fluid in the reservoir, a lot of ppl noticed that after they changed the fluid in the reservoir and ride for a few hundred miles that it turned darker as before so it mixes after a while. I'll do the same for the steering wheel fluid which I changed a few days ago but probably I'll do it after a few weeks between exchanges.
I can only wonder if you want to maintain the Honda properly or just not spend money. Your idea is, IMHO, a rather waste of money and it will not result in having good, clean brake fluid in your car. You are, I believe, being penny wise and dollar foolish. Have all maintenance done correctly if you want reliability and believe in preventive maintenance.

One reason for having a technician/mechanic do the job is that person will also inspect the brake system to determine if there are any other problems or not. Brakes are a major safety issue and it does not pay to try to save a few bucks if one can't/doesn't do the job correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I can only wonder if you want to maintain the Honda properly or just not spend money. Your idea is, IMHO, a rather waste of money and it will not result in having good, clean brake fluid in your car. You are, I believe, being penny wise and dollar foolish. Have all maintenance done correctly if you want reliability and believe in preventive maintenance.

One reason for having a technician/mechanic do the job is that person will also inspect the brake system to determine if there are any other problems or not. Brakes are a major safety issue and it does not pay to try to save a few bucks if one can't/doesn't do the job correctly.
My brakes are fine even before I changed the fluid it was good and my mechanic checked it before. I'm not going to spend money because I know I can do the bleeding, but I choose not to because there is an easier method, although it will take more time to clean the whole system. I don't have a jack and can't buy one because I live in an apartment and don't have a storage for it. I'm starting doing all my maintenance and changing all the fluid, no reason to call a beginner DIY a dollar foolish because I don't have the privilege to have all the equipment available.
 

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Thank you all for the feedback, I asked a few mechanics and it's around $100 to do the bleeding! no thank you.
I'll do the following which worked for many, but let me know if it's a good idea:

I'll ride for around 1000-2000 miles and then I'll replace again the brake fluid in the reservoir, a lot of ppl noticed that after they changed the fluid in the reservoir and ride for a few hundred miles that it turned darker as before so it mixes after a while. I'll do the same for the steering wheel fluid which I changed a few days ago but probably I'll do it after a few weeks between exchanges.
One major difference between the brake and power steering systems is that for the power steering system the fluid flows in a circular loop (reservoir to pump to rack back to reservoir) so the condition of the fluid in the reservoir will be similar to the quality of fluid in the rest of the system. For the brake system there are four tubes that dead end at each brake caliper. In order for the fluid to 鈥渃irculate鈥 it must bounce off the caliper and make its way back up the brake line to the master cylinder. Some of those brake lines are almost 20 feet long. I wouldn鈥檛 count on the quality of the brake fluid being the same in the reservoir compared to at the caliper. I think it鈥檚 a better idea to bleed the brake system if you want to ensure you have quality fluid throughout the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
One major difference between the brake and power steering systems is that for the power steering system the fluid flows in a circular loop (reservoir to pump to rack back to reservoir) so the condition of the fluid in the reservoir will be similar to the quality of fluid in the rest of the system. For the brake system there are four tubes that dead end at each brake caliper. In order for the fluid to 鈥渃irculate鈥 it must bounce off the caliper and make its way back up the brake line to the master cylinder. Some of those brake lines are almost 20 feet long. I wouldn鈥檛 count on the quality of the brake fluid being the same in the reservoir compared to at the caliper. I think it鈥檚 a better idea to bleed the brake system if you want to ensure you have quality fluid throughout the system.
That was my understanding too but I found a thread and a YouTube video mentioned that "the majority" of the fluid will mix over time. Here is the thread I'm new to this forum so I'm not sure if I'm allowed to share links to other forums, anyway here it's:

One of the guys did testing on the water percentage on the fluid and it went up after a few miles and color changed too.
I'll do the bleeding in the future but I mean for a lot of ppl like me who don't have a jack this idea of changing the fluid every multiple thousand miles is feasible and will change the majority of the fluid to my understanding. I'll test it anyway and see how the fluid changes over time.
 

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That was my understanding too but I found a thread and a YouTube video mentioned that "the majority" of the fluid will mix over time. Here is the thread I'm new to this forum so I'm not sure if I'm allowed to share links to other forums, anyway here it's:

One of the guys did testing on the water percentage on the fluid and it went up after a few miles and color changed too.
I'll do the bleeding in the future but I mean for a lot of ppl like me who don't have a jack this idea of changing the fluid every multiple thousand miles is feasible and will change the majority of the fluid to my understanding. I'll test it anyway and see how the fluid changes over time.
Sounds to me like the poster you are referring to is unaware that water is heavier than brake fluid. What he believes is a lessening of water in the fluid could easily bey that the water in the system, being heavier than the brake fluid, was pushed out of the reservoir down into the lines and eventually to the calipers. His test was of the fluid in the reservoir, not the brake lines or the calipers. It's one of the reasons brakes are bled. you can drain the oil from the engine or you can suck it out from above, both methods work. Since the brakes are a hydraulic system, they like other hydraulic systems are bled.

When water contaminates the brake system it will sink to the bottom of the reservoir. When the brakes are used that water,will get pumped to the bottom of the system infiltrating the steel brake lines and calipers. Water will damage brake lines and calipers, there is no recovery from the damage of rusted out brake lines or rusted sticking calipers except replacement. A costly repair for an easily fixable problem up front.
 

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One of the reasons Honda states to do DF, PF, PR, and DR is to minimize the mixing of old fluid to new if you drained and replaced the fluid in the master. The fluid in the front two sides have less distance to travel back up to the master. Some may differ on that. Just my .02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
An update: Just came back from a 200 miles trip didn't drive daily since the first refill, I emptied the reservoir again and it was green and dark like I never changed it from two weeks added new clear fluid. I don't know what everyone is talking about Fluid does mix and I'll guess I'll follow up with changing every few hundred miles until it's relatively clear and clean.
 

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An update: Just came back from a 200 miles trip didn't drive daily since the first refill, I emptied the reservoir again and it was green and dark like I never changed it from two weeks added new clear fluid. I don't know what everyone is talking about Fluid does mix and I'll guess I'll follow up with changing every few hundred miles until it's relatively clear and clean.
Your situation may be different due to prior maintenance or the lack of. A thorough fluid change again sounds like a good plan
 

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An update: Just came back from a 200 miles trip didn't drive daily since the first refill, I emptied the reservoir again and it was green and dark like I never changed it from two weeks added new clear fluid. I don't know what everyone is talking about Fluid does mix and I'll guess I'll follow up with changing every few hundred miles until it's relatively clear and clean.
It likely wont ever be clear of you dont flush it out properly. To me it sounds like someone's trying to use the trans flush method on yhe braking system. 2 different fluid types. If you can bleed flushing the system isnt that much more difficult. If you're comfortable driving it the way it is thats fine. But, the clear fluid will not remove the water the old brake fluid has absorbed and its contaminating the new fluid. the reason it needs to be flushed. Brake fluid absorbs moisture like a sponge.
 

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To reiterate, brake fluid is hygroscopic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
It likely wont ever be clear of you dont flush it out properly. To me it sounds like someone's trying to use the trans flush method on yhe braking system. 2 different fluid types. If you can bleed flushing the system isnt that much more difficult. If you're comfortable driving it the way it is thats fine. But, the clear fluid will not remove the water the old brake fluid has absorbed and its contaminating the new fluid. the reason it needs to be flushed. Brake fluid absorbs moisture like a sponge.
I guess my best option is to change it one more time after a few hundred miles and by next year drain it or use a mechanic help. What I wanted to note is the first time after I changed the fluid brakes felt firm but by driving I felt it's worse, yesterday after I changed it the second time it went back to the firm feel, I'm not sure if this is related to not draining the fluid but this happened for me on my previous car a 96 toyota corolla.
 

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Here's a link from 1AAuto showing it. I didn't watch it but they're pretty solid. Just follow Hondas order. It really is super easy. My 9 year old helper and I did it in like 20 minutes. The headache you will save yourself is well worth it. It's just as easy as an oil change. I'll call it easier than an oil change actually because I got less dirty and had less clean up. 馃し鈥嶁檪锔

 

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To reiterate, brake fluid is hygroscopic.
Maybe this is overkill, lol
 
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