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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have a 2008 Honda Pilot since 2019, I neglected most fluid maintenance other than oil change. Now I'm trying to catch up but since I'm novice with cars I started with changing Air filters, Coolant and later this week I'll change the steering wheel fluid. But, I was hesitant to do the brake fluid bleeding because I'm afraid I'll get air in, and I don't have a reliable jack. I found a video that advised ppl who don't change brake fluid at all to take the fluid out from the reservoir and replace with a new one so I did that today using Preston Dot 3 because the fluid looked dirty almost greenish. I have a few questions:

1. I bought 2 12oz bottles but only used a half bottle, I'm surprised of how small the reservoir is, does the reservoir fluid mixes with the fluid in the 4 brakes from driving the car?

2. Can I remove the fluid in 1 or 2 weeks so it's mixed and use the bottles I have?

3. Can I use the bottle I opened already if I'm gonna do another fluid exchange in a couple of weeks, or I will let air in?

Just a note: I know this is not the ultimate solution, and I'll do full flush probably in 6 months, but I'm talking about at the moment is it a good solution to exchange it multiple times until it's clean?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Best if you bleed the system, just replacing what's in the reservoir leaves dirty fluid in the rest of the system. The major contaminate in brake fluid is moisture. As long as the bottle you opened is sealed it should be fine.
 

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A 2019 is still very new. Unless the Pilot has braking issues, I would wait until time to replace brake pads to flush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A 2019 is still very new. Unless the Pilot has braking issues, I would wait until time to replace brake pads to flush.
It's a 2008 Pilot I bought in 2019 from the second owner with 107K miles on it, now it's on a 118K miles. Not sure if the previous owners changed brake fluids ever, it looked very dark.
 

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It's a 2008 Pilot I bought in 2019 from the second owner with 107K miles on it, now it's on a 118K miles. Not sure if the previous owners changed brake fluids ever, it looked very dark.
If you have a friend that's handy with cars, have them give you a hand. Bleeding is easiest done with two people unless you have a power bleeder. My wife gives me a hand when I need to bleed brakes.
 

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It's a 2008 Pilot I bought in 2019 from the second owner with 107K miles on it, now it's on a 118K miles. Not sure if the previous owners changed brake fluids ever, it looked very dark.
Oops, understandable then. 😁👍
 

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1. I bought 2 12oz bottles but only used a half bottle, I'm surprised of how small the reservoir is, does the reservoir fluid mixes with the fluid in the 4 brakes from driving the car?

2. Can I remove the fluid in 1 or 2 weeks so it's mixed and use the bottles I have?

3. Can I use the bottle I opened already if I'm gonna do another fluid exchange in a couple of weeks, or I will let air in?
There won't be any significant mixing of the fluid in the reservoir with the rest of the system unless you have a leak somewhere. If you empty the reservoir again in a few weeks, you'll mostly be removing what you just put in.

If you want to start slow, bleed the "farthest" wheel - I think that's passenger rear - That would at least pull new fluid through the master cylinder and ABS unit. It will probably also give you confidence in doing the rest.

You can get a decent 3-ton jack at Harbor Freight for around $100. The money you save on DIY will more than pay for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There won't be any significant mixing of the fluid in the reservoir with the rest of the system unless you have a leak somewhere. If you empty the reservoir again in a few weeks, you'll mostly be removing what you just put in.

If you want to start slow, bleed the "farthest" wheel - I think that's passenger rear - That would at least pull new fluid through the master cylinder and ABS unit. It will probably also give you confidence in doing the rest.

You can get a decent 3-ton jack at Harbor Freight for around $100. The money you save on DIY will more than pay for it.
I thought about getting a jack today when I was at HF but I live in apartment it's overkill I don't know where to store it.

My problem is I'm not confident enough, I don't want to risk getting air in which from my research is a huge issue and not easily fixable.
 

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Do you have an air compressor? If so a vacuum bleeder from harbor freight makes this super easy and they are cheap. I don’t even have to jack up our Pilot to do it. Just crawl under hook it up, start the vacuum, open the bleeder and then keep it topped up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Do you have an air compressor? If so a vacuum bleeder from harbor freight makes this super easy and they are cheap. I don’t even have to jack up our Pilot to do it. Just crawl under hook it up, start the vacuum, open the bleeder and then keep it topped up.
If I don't need to take the wheels out that would be a perfect solution, But why I need an air compressor I saw ytb videos where they use those bleeders without any and it was a one man job which is what I'm looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Soda bottle and some hose from the hardware store. Easy process I need to do myself too. I bought a 2008 pilot about 2 months ago and noticed the brake fluid has moisture.

That's a very good and easy method actually but is it a guarantee that I don't let air in the system?

Edit: he ended up replacing the caliber because of a stripped screw, He's more experienced than I'm and he ended up with something major. I don't feel confident on doing that tbh.
 

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Don't stress yourself out about this too much. You won't screw it up if you don't let the reservoir run dry. I had my 9 year old help me. Get some flexible clear tubing from home depot. I paid 5 bucks and used not even half. I took an empty water bottle and cut a hole in it and put one side of the line in. I put the other side on the brake bleeder screw. You can use the car jack to jack it up and if you don't have jack stands, worst case scenario just put the tire under the frame of the car in case the jack fails (really you don't have jack stands for a flat change and you'll have the tire off 5 minutes max). I do this method even when I use jack stands as an extra safety.

Next I put a small piece of 2x4 under the brake pedal so when it is pushed all the way in it doesn't touch the floor completely. After the tire is off and the tube is on the bleeder valve, next have a partner pump your brakes three times (car is off the whole time), have them hold down on the third pump, open your bleeder screw and have them tell you when it hits the floor. Then close the valve and have them pump again. Rinse and repeat until you see clean fluid in the line. Check the reservoir after every caliper and fill it as needed. I filled in between each one. If you're paranoid like I was at first check more often.

Make sure you follow the Honda method : driver front, pass front, pass rear, driver rear. Then top off your fluid at the end and you're done.

You can do it! Just be patient and double check your work. Also, I emptied my water bottle of old fluid after every 2 calipers, so a total of twice.
 

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If there's a lot of air in the system having your pump the brake peddle helper push the peddle to the floor when you open the bleeder and hold the peddle to the floor while you close it will push the air through the line instead of compressing it. Repeat until you are getting clear fluid and just small air bubbles, then do the pump the pedal three times and hold to floor to remove the remaining air in the system.
 

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If I don't need to take the wheels out that would be a perfect solution, But why I need an air compressor I saw ytb videos where they use those bleeders without any and it was a one man job which is what I'm looking for.
Lots of ways to do it. I use a tool that relies on the air compressor which sucks the fluid from each caliper. It just makes the job faster, easier, and cleaner. You can look under there to see if you can get to the bleeder without jacking it up. On the 2nd gen Pilot you can very easily.

Here is the tool I use:

 

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The Mrs has always been kind enough to come pump brakes for me.
Be sure to wear eye protection when down on the ground bleeding brakes. BF in the eye is bad mojo.
 

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The Mrs has always been kind enough to come pump brakes for me.
Be sure to wear eye protection when down on the ground bleeding brakes. BF in the eye is bad mojo.
My wife will as well, but only if I agree to hearing her protests about it. The vacuum setup is just so much faster and easier though. Only time I needed my wife to help was somehow I got air in the clutch line on the bmw and old school pumping seemed to help get it out.
 

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My wife will as well, but only if I agree to hearing her protests about it. The vacuum setup is just so much faster and easier though. Only time I needed my wife to help was somehow I got air in the clutch line on the bmw and old school pumping seemed to help get it out.
Lol mine complains too. Especially if she's busy.
150444

It may cost me dinner, but the brakes are bled.
😁👍
 
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