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Cabin Air Filter Change

To ArmyStrong, Inspector1, and all who are changing the filter:
First, great instructions on changing the filter...saved $ & much time. However, after examination, I believe that the plastic bar we cut and removed was in place to protect the front of your shins in the case of a severe frontal impact. After completion of filter replacement, I stuck my hand on the bottom of the glove box and could feel the edge of the bar. I have seen what your legs will do to the lower part of a dashboard in a frontal impact on a friends car....big "dents" in the shape of your legs! I plan on countersinking a couple of self-tapping metal screws high on the front of the plastic bar that screw in to the metal bar, to hold plastic bar in roughly the same position. With Phillip's head screws, it should be a snap to remove and replace.
Thanks again, efine.
 

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Re: Cabin Air Filter Change

efine said:
...I believe that the plastic bar we cut and removed was in place to protect the front of your shins in the case of a severe frontal impact...
I doubt Honda would devise a maintenance procedure that reduces the safety of the car. Removing that piece of plastic isn't a "shade tree" fix - it's the official way to replace the filter as specified by Honda in the shop manual.

- Mark
 

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Re: Re: Cabin Air Filter Change

whizmo said:


I doubt Honda would devise a maintenance procedure that reduces the safety of the car. Removing that piece of plastic isn't a "shade tree" fix - it's the official way to replace the filter as specified by Honda in the shop manual.

- Mark
Mark,

I am just using common sense and the physical evidence I have witnessed of a post-crash car....the lower half of your legs are not secured by anything, and these legs literally made "u's" in the dashboard where they hit. (Take a trip to your local junkyard and look at some severe frontal crashs) The dashboard was sheet metal covered by a padded vinyl cover and it still turned his legs black and blue. If there had been any sharp edges there, he would have been severely lacerated.
Honda crash tested the vehicle with the plastic bar in place...why is the plastic bar there in the first place, as the metal bar structurally ties in the dash fascia with its underlying structure? I believe it was to protect the crash dummy's lower legs in the test, & ours if the bar is still in place! Just put your hand under the bottom lip of the GB, and you can follow the action of the contact your legs would have with that bar.
Regards,
efine
 

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panamamike said:
Why did they make a part you have to cut off?
Aside from my thoughts on needing it to keep the numbers high on the initial crash test, why did they put the airfilter in that position in the first place, knowing you would have to change it on a semi-regular basis? Why is the oilfilter not located in an easy to reach location on many cars? Why are there Phillip's head screws and 8mm bolts on the same item, and not just one or the other? Why do I have to remove the air intake and plenum to get to the back side spark plugs on my Hyundai? Why did the auto industry fight the introduction of airbags and the catalytic converter?
HUMAN ERROR/STUPIDITY/GREED, ENGINEERS, & BEANCOUNTERS! :)
efine
 

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Re: Cabin Air Filter Change

efine said:
I believe that the plastic bar we cut and removed was in place to protect the front of your shins in the case of a severe frontal impact.
Actually, the plastic bar that is removed to get to the cabin air filter is not there for any kind of crash protection. It is molded into the dash structure in order to facilitate dash installation and alignment at the factory. The dash is first installed as a single unit. The plastic bar prevents the bottom of the dash to spread as the assembly is bolted in. As the final step, the metal bar is bolted into the structure of the vehicle.

The metal bar, in fact, constitutes the safety structure and the dash integrity mechanism, not the plastic bar. Once the metal bar is bolted to the structure of the vehicle, the plastic bar has no further function, safety or otherwise. It’s only there as a convenience to the assembly line workers. Ever wonder why things are so well lined up? It’s one of Honda’s many little secrets.

Take a look at the metal structure under the dash, on the driver's side. It's even more robust and complex.
 

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Re: Re: Cabin Air Filter Change

A6Pilot said:


Actually, the plastic bar that is removed to get to the cabin air filter is not there for any kind of crash protection. It is molded into the dash structure in order to facilitate dash installation and alignment at the factory. The dash is first installed as a single unit. The plastic bar prevents the bottom of the dash to spread as the assembly is bolted in. As the final step, the metal bar is bolted into the structure of the vehicle.

The metal bar, in fact, constitutes the safety structure and the dash integrity mechanism, not the plastic bar. Once the metal bar is bolted to the structure of the vehicle, the plastic bar has no further function, safety or otherwise. It’s only there as a convenience to the assembly line workers. Ever wonder why things are so well lined up? It’s one of Honda’s many little secrets.

Take a look at the metal structure under the dash, on the driver's side. It's even more robust and complex.
Actually, the plastic bar that is removed to get to the cabin air filter is not there for any kind of crash protection.

I can not challenge with any veracity, what you said regarding the dash installation because I don't have any knowledge of the installation procedure. However, if the metal bar is already screwed to the dash, before they set the dash in and screw the last 8 mm bolts to the underlying vehicle structure, why would they need the plastic bar at all, as the metal bar is already keeping the continuity of the dash in place?
Be that as it may, if you put your hand down where the shin bones of your legs would impact the bottom of the GB, mine came into direct contact with the edge of the metal bar only after I removed the plastic bar. I did not feel the metal bar at all before removal of the plastic one. Ergo, I will still screw mine back into place for protection, although I have no guarantee or proof that it will work.
You, of course, may do as you like! :)
Regards,
efine
 

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Thanks for the easier DIY instructions ArmyStrong. This was my first cabin filter replacement on our second Pilot; much easier this time around compared to the last. :4: HOOAH!
 

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Discussion Starter #50
joel said:
1/2 hour well spent, thanks for the Pics
Very glad the pictures helped. The time I spent doing the post, is worth it when I get positive feedback from many Pilot Org members.
Thank You
Take Care
 

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Cabin Filter

WOW 20 min start to finish. Next time 15 or less don't have to remove the plastic bar. I would like to go to work for Honda just replacing the filters. Man could make a good living working a couple days a week!!
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Re: Cabin Filter

mikesrc said:
WOW 20 min start to finish. Next time 15 or less don't have to remove the plastic bar. I would like to go to work for Honda just replacing the filters. Man could make a good living working a couple days a week!!
Mike
Mike
If you got several non-org members that are not willing to do this task, you are absolutely right, you could make a killing changing filters. I wouldn't mind working for Honda a couple hours on the weekend, but I like to tinker and do stuff to my own vehicles and pass on the experiences to others. That way we don't have to visit the dealers that make a killing from tasks like this one.

Glad this thread helped. Take Care..........JIM
 

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Thanks for your excellent "How to." It really makes a difference when pictures and normal language are used. You'd make a good technical writer.
I did the job and your instructions made all the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
xinix said:
Thanks for your excellent "How to." It really makes a difference when pictures and normal language are used. You'd make a good technical writer.
I did the job and your instructions made all the difference.
I try to make it as simple as possible. I think next time I will include the verbage from the Operators Manual that way you can read what Honda wants you to do, including Torques, and then what my maintenance procedures are.
Take Care
Jim
 

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youbetcha said:


The filters installed at the factory are black because they have charcoal in them.
I wonder if the activated carbon (charcoal) in only the initial "from the factory" filter is associated with off-gassing of the new plastics and foams as they cure (e.g. formaldehyde and the other chemicals that comprise the "new car smell"). Just a hypothesis, and I have no idea how one would attempt to verify it.
 

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I just changed my cabin filter with a Fram CF8813A FreshBreeze I bought from Amazon.com for less than $24. Big Thanks to Armystrong. Your wonderful step by step instructions made it so easy.
 

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Big thanks for the write-up!!! My 2004 had never had its cabin filter replaced and boy was it disgusting. Now I'll do it every year.
 
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