Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My rear brake pads are making horrible noises and I am sure they have nothing left on them. The rear rotors also have grooves in them so I figured I’d replace both.

I ordered a front and rear kit from RockAuto using the code for about $150 (they are centric).

I plan to replace them myself but I have a few questions. I don’t have a ton of tools, just the basics. I do have a torque wrench and jack and jack stands. I am slightly concerned about the rear ones, due to the parking brake making things more complicated. I watched several videos but was wondering if anyone with first hand knowledge could give me a few tips on how to makeit as painless as possible. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
You NEED an impact screwdriver to remove the screws in the rotors. They will strip without using one of these and this is a handy and inexpensive tool to purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
So many lessons learned:
(These are your brakes that keep you from dying, important to do it right)

1. Read the service manual instructions for both pad and rotor replacement - chapter 19 For pads, rotors are on page 18-22
Read each step, reflect on if you have the tools and supplies needed.

2. For the rotor screw, if you cant get it out, you can drill head off. It is soft steel, may not even be there if it has been done before. The screw keeps the rotor in place when the caliper is tilted up. Nice to have the screw installed, but not essential. I use a Vessel 125943 impact screwdriver for mine, but the screw is not essential if you cant get it off. Drill off the head, not all the way through into the hub, etc.

3. With new rotors, you will need readjust the parking brake shoes. Do this before putting the wheels back on. The parking brake will either drag or be too loose due to the different rotor hat inside diameter. See page 19-6 and -7in service book. My bet is that you will need to do the “major adjustment“ with flipping the adjuster through the rotor access hole, so you have to do before putting wheels back on.

4. Consider replacing the ”pad retainers” if the vehicle is old. (See diagram on page 19-21). I replace them when I replace rotors (if reasonable age).

5. Apply grease specified where service manual calls for it. I use the M77 paste as specified by Honda and included with their pads. Centric may provide some with pads. I brush it on with some small metal handle disposable brushes, like an artist brush, but stiffer bristles. See diagram on page 19-19.

6. Lube the caliper pins while you are doing pads. I use the Honda specified silicone grease, but there are other high temp brake pin greases available. Dont use the paste provided for the brake pads on the caliper pins - wrong stuff.

7. For removing the rotors, the manual has stuff about using screws to push the rotor off, I have never had this issuel. Usually falls off, or whack with deadblow or rubber mallet.

8. You will need brake cleaner spray and a caliper compressor to push the piston in. The Lisle 24400 works ok for the rear brakes. Use it with the old pads to make sure it pushes piston in straight.

9. I usually use a turkey baster to suck out some brake fluid from the resevoir to make sure it doesnt overflow when pushing piston in. You will need some Honda brake fluid to replace with after done. Some will say bleed the fluid at the caliper but that is a little involved for DIY. I pay to get brake fluid flushed at all 4 wheels every 3 years along with coolant replacement. Messy and tedious jobs without a shop lift and a patient helper. Cover up everything around when messing with brake fluid, it is corrosive.

10. Spread a trash bag out on garage floor below wheel you are working on, otherwise your will get brake dust and grease everywhere.

11. To change the rotor, will need to remove the caliper bracket which might take some torque to loosen the two bolts. Make sure you have at least a 12 or 16 inch ratchet or impact gun that can do 100 ft-lb available. I personally replace the caliper bracket bolts with Honda parts whenever I remove them but I am a little anal.

12. Use your torque wrench to tighten the caliper bracket bolts and the caliper bolts to the torque specs on the diagram on page 19-21. I suggest a 0-100 ftlb or 0-150 ftlb range torque wrench. You can also use it to put the wheel nuts back on to correct torque (85 ftlb for this model I think). I had a friend not tighten the caliper bracket bolts and one came out and really made his wife mad.

13. I print out related service manuals pages, highlight important specs (torques, etc) and check off steps and important checks when doing brakes. My wife and kids ride and drive so I want to be error proof. Do the work when you are fresh and have full day available. Not hard at all really.

Thats all I can think of for now.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So many lessons learned:
(These are your brakes that keep you from dying, important to do it right)

1. Read the service manual instructions for both pad and rotor replacement - chapter 19 For pads, rotors are on page 18-22
Read each step, reflect on if you have the tools and supplies needed.

2. For the rotor screw, if you cant get it out, you can drill head off. It is soft steel, may not even be there if it has been done before. The screw keeps the rotor in place when the caliper is tilted up. Nice to have the screw installed, but not essential. I use a Vessel 125943 impact screwdriver for mine, but the screw is not essential if you cant get it off. Drill off the head, not all the way through into the hub, etc.

3. With new rotors, you will need readjust the parking brake shoes. Do this before putting the wheels back on. The parking brake will either drag or be too loose due to the different rotor hat inside diameter. See page 19-6 and -7in service book. My bet is that you will need to do the “major adjustment“ with flipping the adjuster through the rotor access hole, so you have to do before putting wheels back on.

4. Consider replacing the ”pad retainers” if the vehicle is old. (See diagram on page 19-21). I replace them when I replace rotors (if reasonable age).

5. Apply grease specified where service manual calls for it. I use the M77 paste as specified by Honda and included with their pads. Centric may provide some with pads. I brush it on with some small metal handle disposable brushes, like an artist brush, but stiffer bristles. See diagram on page 19-19.

6. Lube the caliper pins while you are doing pads. I use the Honda specified silicone grease, but there are other high temp brake pin greases available. Dont use the paste provided for the brake pads on the caliper pins - wrong stuff.

7. For removing the rotors, the manual has stuff about using screws to push the rotor off, I have never had this issuel. Usually falls off, or whack with deadblow or rubber mallet.

8. You will need brake cleaner spray and a caliper compressor to push the piston in. The Lisle 24400 works ok for the rear brakes. Use it with the old pads to make sure it pushes piston in straight.

9. I usually use a turkey baster to suck out some brake fluid from the resevoir to make sure it doesnt overflow when pushing piston in. You will need some Honda brake fluid to replace with after done. Some will say bleed the fluid at the caliper but that is a little involved for DIY. I pay to get brake fluid flushed at all 4 wheels every 3 years along with coolant replacement. Messy and tedious jobs without a shop lift and a patient helper. Cover up everything around when messing with brake fluid, it is corrosive.

10. Spread a trash bag out on garage floor below wheel you are working on, otherwise your will get brake dust and grease everywhere.

11. To change the rotor, will need to remove the caliper bracket which might take some torque to loosen the two bolts. Make sure you have at least a 12 or 16 inch ratchet or impact gun that can do 100 ft-lb available. I personally replace the caliper bracket bolts with Honda parts whenever I remove them but I am a little anal.

12. Use your torque wrench to tighten the caliper bracket bolts and the caliper bolts to the torque specs on the diagram on page 19-21. I suggest a 0-100 ftlb or 0-150 ftlb range torque wrench. You can also use it to put the wheel nuts back on to correct torque (85 ftlb for this model I think). I had a friend not tighten the caliper bracket bolts and one came out and really made his wife mad.

13. I print out related service manuals pages, highlight important specs (torques, etc) and check off steps and important checks when doing brakes. My wife and kids ride and drive so I want to be error proof. Do the work when you are fresh and have full day available. Not hard at all really.

Thats all I can think of for now.
thanks this is exactly what I was looking for! Now I just can’t make a decision on which brand to get. It’s torturing me because there are so many options.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
379 Posts
You NEED an impact screwdriver to remove the screws in the rotors. They will strip without using one of these and this is a handy and inexpensive tool to purchase.
Drill them out if you have to. They are for convenience only and have no real value. If mine come out or if I drill them out...they stay out. I toss them. No need to deal with them every time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Probably not the last time you deal with a stuck/frozen screw.... I would say get an impact screwdriver. Costs about $20 but in some cases can be totally indispensable.

This particular wrench worked wonders for getting caliper bracket bolts out:

Brake caliper spreader highly recommended:

Get some quality solid rubber wheel chocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
For pads, I use the Honda OEM pads. I have not done an extensive comparative testing program, but they work fine for me. I read good things one here about Centric and Akebono (who is the OEM pad manufacturer for Honda).

For rear rotors, my 06 Pilot has Bosch Quietcast rear rotors and they have been good. No warping and the silver coating is looking good in the non-wear areas. The were well machined and a good copy of the OEM - same features, same holes/machining, etc. I also read good things here about Centric.

For the front rotors, I have stuck with Honda OEM on the 11 Odys and 19 Pilot, but I do have a set of Bosch Quietcast on my shelf for when the 06 Pilot needs rotors next time, they were like $20 each on Amazon’s open box sale. Casting and machining quality looks like Honda OEM at least.

For the caliper pin lubricant if you don’t want to get the Honda silicone grease (expensive for a big tube that will last your entire lifetime), I have used Permatex Silicone Ceramic Extreme Brake Parts Lubricant as the closest readily available substitute I could find. Permatex 24129 is a small tube, they also sell at autoparts stores in the ketchup packages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,031 Posts
Now I just can’t make a decision on which brand to get. It’s torturing me because there are so many options.
In your first post you stated that "I ordered a front and rear kit from RockAuto using the code for about $150 (they are centric)."
Seems as though you have already made a decision as to which parts to buy.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
In your first post you stated that "I ordered a front and rear kit from RockAuto using the code for about $150 (they are centric)."
Seems as though you have already made a decision as to which parts to buy.
And now I am undecided. Which is why I asked for input on what to buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
And now I am undecided. Which is why I asked for input on what to buy.
The only vehicle I didn't buy the Centric axle pack front and rear for is the only vehicle I've had braking issues on. Until they falter I will continue to buy Centric.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
Centric has two dual-axle kits, one for $120 and then a coated rotor kit with higher end pads for $190.

I'd choose the latter. But I'd feel great the the cheaper too. But if in the rust belt, no question the latter.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Centric has two dual-axle kits, one for $120 and then a coated rotor kit with higher end pads for $190.

I'd choose the latter. But I'd feel great the the cheaper too. But if in the rust belt, no question the latter.
interesting thanks for that. I live in GA so I guess coated rotors aren’t completely necessary? I like the idea of higher end pads though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
Centric has two dual-axle kits, one for $120 and then a coated rotor kit with higher end pads for $190.

I'd choose the latter. But I'd feel great the the cheaper too. But if in the rust belt, no question the latter.
I'm in the rust belt, so I always opt for the coated rotors if the choice is available for that vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
interesting thanks for that. I live in GA so I guess coated rotors aren’t completely necessary? I like the idea of higher end pads though...
The rotors will still look nicer for longer, I think even if I lived in a non-snow/road salt state I'd get the coated rotors so they don't look as rusty as quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,151 Posts
Here are the ones I finally got, after being unsatisfied with OEM and then a cheaper Rockauto set. This set, also through Rockauto, are the brakes the Pilot should have had all along. Still satisfied.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Hmm, I had terrible scraping noise coming from my rear brakes this summer. It turned out to be the backing plates. The mechanic pushed the plate away (It was bent) and the noise disappeared!
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks everyone for your help! I changed out the rear pads and rotors yesterday afternoon. Everything was simple and easy. The screws on the left came out with a screwdriver and the right side had to be drilled out and not replaced. I plan on doing the front this weekend.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top