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Discussion Starter #1
I replaced brake pads in my 2016 EX-L today. I did not touch anything other than removing the calipers, installing ODM pads (front and rear), pushing the piston back inside to open the caliper and installing the caliper back on. Well I also greased the pins to make sure they move smoothly but that doesn’t change anything.

Question I have is, do I need to bleed the line? I have done this many time in my 2012 Ridgeline and in Toyota and Lexus and never bothered to bleed the line because I didn’t touch the master cylinder.

I just want to know if someone thinks this is important to do? The breaks were super squishy when I started the test drive after the replacement but they became responsive by the time I was out of my driveway.

That said I still feel they are not the same “instantaneous” as they were before. Seems a little on the softer side.

Thoughts?
 

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If your brakes are firm and responsive now, you can put off bleeding the calipers for a while. However, it is good practice to bleed out each caliper after the pad replacement. The fluid in the caliper tends to become contaminated and rusty. If you know how to bleed brakes, then flush a little new fluid through your calipers when you get a chance.
 

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Honda recommends the brake fluid be changed every 3 years. Might be time.
 

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You should not have to bleed them. On all my Hondas I just pump the brakes slowly after the change and it returns back to normal. The brakes may feel a little different until the are bed in. They will also feel a little different if you switch brands/compounds.
 

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If you didn't open the system you shouldn't have to bleed them. When doing pads loosen the cap on brake reservoir when you compress caliper. Once you are done with that caliper, tighten cap and pump brakes back up. Repeat for other calipers. If you loosen cap and just compress all pistons you'll have overflow. Just repeat procedure and you should be fine. If your brake system wasn't opened, but your pedal is low you may need fluid. If it's spongy then you may need all new fluid. Brakes only need to be bled if air is introduced to the system.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your input. The break pedal appears to back to normal so I am going to hold off on bleeding the lines.

@slipjohn1, your recommendation sounds interesting. I will follow it next time I have to changes break pads.
 

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Yeah, I've never heard of bleeding brakes when relating to replacing brake pads. In fact, even though every 3 years is recommended, it shouldn't affect your braking capabilities ESPECIALLY not on a 2016. I'm sure there are countless people with decades old vehicles where the brake fluid has never been touched. I finally got around to changing the fluid a couple months ago on my 2013 and it didn't change that.

I'm surprised no one mentioned bedding the brakes which is more important after changing pads.
 
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