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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did the timing belt about 300 miles ago, and now I am noticing my belt is slowly migrating off the top pulley on the belt tensioner. The tensioner and serpentine belt are Genuine Honda Parts and are few years old. The belt tension does not seem to tight, I can twist the belt half way, which I think is ok.
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Here are some photos when I finished the timing belt you could see about 2/16 of the belt tensioner wheel on the left side a tiny sliver of silver, now it is seem to be right on the edge maybe even hanging off a 16th and I can not see the wheel at all.

Any ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I compressed the cylinder three times on the tensioner. I don't know if that did anything. When it's running I noticed it is on really good on the top wheel the exact opposite of when the motor is turned off. Honda screwed up this design bad, really bad. When the motor is off it's hanging off the edge a little when the motor's on it's running closer to the opposite side. I'm just going to put a new belt and tensioner on.

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I'm going to diagnose this as a weak belt tensioner as when I pull on the belt it's just a little to loose, I can feel the tensioner piston moving, and also I can twist the belt past half way.

I hope this helps someone in the future.
 

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If it's never been replaced, I would.
I'd release the tension and spin the pulley. If you can hear the bearings, rough dry sound, it likely needs to be replaced. If it feels loose, wiggling it side to side, I'd replace.
 
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The tensioner should have been part of the timing belt service along with water pump with rubber gasket, idler pulley, tensioner pulley, and hydrolic tensioner. Saves problems later on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
$265.90 for the Serpentine belt tensioner and $59.44 for new Serpentine belt at my local Honda Dealer equals 348.00 with tax. I'm pretty sure it is not part of the timing belt service, it most likely recommended on top of the timing belt service. Both were replaced two or three years ago with Genuine Honda parts at a stealership and since the original lasted 9 years I thought I had some time on it. I am going to keep my eye on it for a while and wait and see.
 

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I've gone 180k miles on a serpentine belt tensioner. Does not necessarily need to be replaced on the first timing belt service. Certainly a more convenient time.
 

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I've gone 180k miles on a serpentine belt tensioner. Does not necessarily need to be replaced on the first timing belt service. Certainly a more convenient time.
Quite true, but the only thing you NEED for the timing place replacement is a new timing belt. You don't need a new water pump or the Hydraulic Tensioner, Idler and Tensioner Bearings unless one or more of them has failed or showing signs of failing. It's one of those things that while you are there it is easier and more cost effective in the long run to replace those things along with the belt.

Since you are already there, why not replace the serpentine belt and tensioner at the same time. Serpentine belt tensioners also wears out over time.

After all isn't the goal of the timing belt service or any other service to get another 100k miles of trouble free service from the engine.

Granted a timing belt failure will usually destroy the engine where a serpentine belt failure usually will not. But when was the last time you had a serpentine belt break in front of an auto parts store, mechanics shop or Honda dealership??? They don't, they tend to fail when you are now 300 miles from Stumble Butt Egypt and that is the closest place to civilization.
 

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Quite true, but the only thing you NEED for the timing place replacement is a new timing belt. You don't need a new water pump or the Hydraulic Tensioner, Idler and Tensioner Bearings unless one or more of them has failed or showing signs of failing. It's one of those things that while you are there it is easier and more cost effective in the long run to replace those things along with the belt.

Since you are already there, why not replace the serpentine belt and tensioner at the same time. Serpentine belt tensioners also wears out over time.

After all isn't the goal of the timing belt service or any other service have another 100k miles of trouble free service from the engine.

Granted a timing belt failure will usually destroy the engine where a serpentine belt failure usually will not. But when was the last time you had a serpentine belt break in front of an auto parts store, mechanics shop or Honda dealership??? They don't, they tend to fail when you are now 300 miles from Stumble Butt Egypt and that is the closest place to civilization.
I wouldn't discourage it. But I'm not going to say someone should or needs to replace their serpentine belt tensioner if it's not needed. Now the serpentine (drive) belt itself I will say is a necessity. The 7 year rule regardless of milage would also be a good practice. If your driving a 2014 Pilot or older and your drive belt had never been replaced, that would be a concern to me.
 

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Honda Service Manual gives pretty good advice on when to replace the hydraulic serpentine belt tensioner. And it's definitely not during any timing belt replacements. There's no mileage replacement requirement and there's really no "best practice". These are run to fail parts.
If loose, if noisy, if vibrating - go ahead and replace it. Otherwise just leave it alone.

I mean, if you are going to replace everything that can potentially fail between timing belt changes - why stop there? Put in new alternator, new A/C compressor, new power steering pump. Why not? They can all fail and are much easier to replace along with the timing belt service

PS: Honda design is fine, your tensioner just failed, that's all. When installed properly, the belt is on pretty tight.
 
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