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Woke up to a hole in my passenger front door window two days ago. Nothing inside was disturbed. Maybe some folks just like smashing stuff?

I have high-deductible insurance, so the cost was all coming out of pocket. Replacement by a pro was 10 days out and $350. My dealer quoted the glass alone for $300. A local independent glass outfit had Chinese glass for $135, next day availability. Jackpot.

I couldn’t find a procedure for doing this on the forum, or anything Pilot-specific elsewhere. No pictures - I was in a hurry. Here’s my 1,000 words, instead.

This is a simple job, but time consuming. The '06 Service Manual leaves out most of the helpful tricks, but is very helpful for removing the inside trim. I can’t imagine that a pro could afford to be as thorough as you can be in cleaning up the mess. If you’re picky, you may be better served doing this job yourself. Just wear gloves and be careful.

1. Glass is everywhere. Start with a shop vac. Get everything you can see. Look way beyond what seems like the edge of the “blast radius”. Be diligent in checking the creases of the weatherstripping in the door. Poke small bits out with a small screwdriver and into your vacuum. Vacuum every cup holder, corner, handle, nook, cranny and flat surface. Avoid long sweeps to avoid cutting your upholstery - try “dabbing” the vacuum onto the surface, moving, then dabbing again.

2. Follow your favorite guide for removing the door trim. The '06 Service Manual that is widely available is adequate for this part. Hint: the first two screws are hidden behind the inside door latch actuator handle. Be sure to remove the inside window trim on the bottom of the window.

3. In front, remove the speaker from the door. Three screws and one plastic connector does it.

4. Peel the plastic door liner up from the bottom, past half way. Separate the adhesive from itself inch by inch, and avoid just reefing on the liner. Fold the liner out the empty window. When it will hang out the window by itself, you’ve peeled it high enough.

5. Now the fun begins. Start vacuuming glass from the interior of the door. It will take many passes to pick up everything you can see. You’ll need a narrow wand / extender for your vacuum to reach the bottom. Open and close the door several times to dislodge bits that are stuck somewhere.

6. When you think you’ve got it all, don’t get excited. You don’t have it all. You’ve got a good start at it, though.

7. Put on some safety glasses and use a compressor to blow out the interior of the door. Pay special attention to the latch mechanism, aiming from the top and front. It’s very common for glass to get in the latch and jam it up. Pound on the door with your hand around the latch mechanism. The rattling of falling glass tells you that you’re making progress.

8. Plug your window controller module into the square connector that is dangling from the door. You need this to lower the regulator.

9. Turn the key to the second position. Lower the regulator a few inches, just to make sure it’s working. If yes, locate the two small portholes in the sheet metal in the middle of the door. Adjust the regulator height until the two 10mm bolts that attach the glass to the regulator appear there. Unless you’re pretty confident in your battery, turn the car back off.

10. A 10mm socket with a magnetic insert will be handy for removing the bolts. You don’t want to drop one of the bolt into the bottom of the door. It’s fairly easy to get a hand in there to stabilize things. Remove the bolts and extract the old plastic tabs that the glass mount to.

11. Angle the new glass down at about a 45 degree angle toward the front. Tip the front bottom corner into the slot, then gently slide it down in the gaskets, onto the regulator, rotating back to horizontal as you go.

12. Aligning the new glass with the regulator is fiddly. Once I had the glass in and roughly located, I found it easiest to thread the bolts into the outboard (wrong) side of the glass to work as locators into the regulator. You can then adjust the glass to get the holes in the regulator lined up with the bolts.

13. Thread the bolts through the regulator into the tabs. Leave them a little loose to allow for adjustment.

14. Give the window a small bump up and down to make sure everything still works. If good, line up the bolts and the portholes again to snug the bolts down.

15. Do a full lift and lower. Try to ignore the sound of glass grinding against glass from the bits you missed - you can’t do anything about that now.

16. Put the safety glasses back on, blow out the inside one more time, and vacuum again. Do a few more full lifts to satisfy yourself that everything is working.

17. Unplug the window control module. Re-assemble, as they always say, in the reverse order.

18. Vacuum the inside one more time. You’ll be surprised how much is still there.
 

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Woke up to a hole in my passenger front door window two days ago. Nothing inside was disturbed. Maybe some folks just like smashing stuff?

I have high-deductible insurance, so the cost was all coming out of pocket. Replacement by a pro was 10 days out and $350. My dealer quoted the glass alone for $300. A local independent glass outfit had Chinese glass for $135, next day availability. Jackpot.

I couldn’t find a procedure for doing this on the forum, or anything Pilot-specific elsewhere. No pictures - I was in a hurry. Here’s my 1,000 words, instead.

This is a simple job, but time consuming. The '06 Service Manual leaves out most of the helpful tricks, but is very helpful for removing the inside trim. I can’t imagine that a pro could afford to be as thorough as you can be in cleaning up the mess. If you’re picky, you may be better served doing this job yourself. Just wear gloves and be careful.

1. Glass is everywhere. Start with a shop vac. Get everything you can see. Look way beyond what seems like the edge of the “blast radius”. Be diligent in checking the creases of the weatherstripping in the door. Poke small bits out with a small screwdriver and into your vacuum. Vacuum every cup holder, corner, handle, nook, cranny and flat surface. Avoid long sweeps to avoid cutting your upholstery - try “dabbing” the vacuum onto the surface, moving, then dabbing again.

2. Follow your favorite guide for removing the door trim. The '06 Service Manual that is widely available is adequate for this part. Hint: the first two screws are hidden behind the inside door latch actuator handle. Be sure to remove the inside window trim on the bottom of the window.

3. In front, remove the speaker from the door. Three screws and one plastic connector does it.

4. Peel the plastic door liner up from the bottom, past half way. Separate the adhesive from itself inch by inch, and avoid just reefing on the liner. Fold the liner out the empty window. When it will hang out the window by itself, you’ve peeled it high enough.

5. Now the fun begins. Start vacuuming glass from the interior of the door. It will take many passes to pick up everything you can see. You’ll need a narrow wand / extender for your vacuum to reach the bottom. Open and close the door several times to dislodge bits that are stuck somewhere.

6. When you think you’ve got it all, don’t get excited. You don’t have it all. You’ve got a good start at it, though.

7. Put on some safety glasses and use a compressor to blow out the interior of the door. Pay special attention to the latch mechanism, aiming from the top and front. It’s very common for glass to get in the latch and jam it up. Pound on the door with your hand around the latch mechanism. The rattling of falling glass tells you that you’re making progress.

8. Plug your window controller module into the square connector that is dangling from the door. You need this to lower the regulator.

9. Turn the key to the second position. Lower the regulator a few inches, just to make sure it’s working. If yes, locate the two small portholes in the sheet metal in the middle of the door. Adjust the regulator height until the two 10mm bolts that attach the glass to the regulator appear there. Unless you’re pretty confident in your battery, turn the car back off.

10. A 10mm socket with a magnetic insert will be handy for removing the bolts. You don’t want to drop one of the bolt into the bottom of the door. It’s fairly easy to get a hand in there to stabilize things. Remove the bolts and extract the old plastic tabs that the glass mount to.

11. Angle the new glass down at about a 45 degree angle toward the front. Tip the front bottom corner into the slot, then gently slide it down in the gaskets, onto the regulator, rotating back to horizontal as you go.

12. Aligning the new glass with the regulator is fiddly. Once I had the glass in and roughly located, I found it easiest to thread the bolts into the outboard (wrong) side of the glass to work as locators into the regulator. You can then adjust the glass to get the holes in the regulator lined up with the bolts.

13. Thread the bolts through the regulator into the tabs. Leave them a little loose to allow for adjustment.

14. Give the window a small bump up and down to make sure everything still works. If good, line up the bolts and the portholes again to snug the bolts down.

15. Do a full lift and lower. Try to ignore the sound of glass grinding against glass from the bits you missed - you can’t do anything about that now.

16. Put the safety glasses back on, blow out the inside one more time, and vacuum again. Do a few more full lifts to satisfy yourself that everything is working.

17. Unplug the window control module. Re-assemble, as they always say, in the reverse order.

18. Vacuum the inside one more time. You’ll be surprised how much is still there.
Got any photos to go with this?
Thanks for the write up.
I bought used OEM windows from salvage yards.
 

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Thank you for taking this nasty event and turning it into a helpful write-up. (y)

If they catch the lowlifes who do this, they should not only be made to pay all costs, but to stand barefoot on the broken glass watching someone go through the entire process of fixing it.
 
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