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DIY Brake Job

216041 Views 7 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  Jeepdoctor
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I did all 4 rotors and pads last night. It was the first time doing a brake job (excluding doing pads once on CRV). Took my time, and finished in an unimpressive 4 hours. Used silicone grease for the caliper pins, brake quiet on the back of the pads, a dab of anti-sieze on the pad tab like part that touches the caliper to help slide it in. Besides that, rotors, pads and tools. Sledge hammer, lugnut wrench, 3/8 breaker bar, 19mm, 17mm, 12mm sockets and combo wrenches, and a drill for the pesky rotor screws.

This was my procedure for front/rear brakes:
1) Remove tire
2) Remove caliper bolts (front 17mm, rear 12mm) and swing caliper out of the way making sure it has proper support (I used a bungee cord)
3) Remove the pads (and take note of their wear and where the wear indicator was located)
4) Remove the caliper bracket (front 19mm, rear 17mm)
5) Remove the rotor screws (I drilled them out, since it was fast and I didn't plan to put them back in)
6) Wack the rotor with a sledge hammer every which way till you get the darn thing out (NOTE: for rear brakes, make sure the emergency brake is OFF prior to this)
7) Clean new rotor with brake clean and slide on
8) Lube caliper pins with silicone grease or other grease, make sure the booties go back on properly
9) install caliper bracket
10) use clamp to compress caliper cylinder (take note of level of brake fluid in reservoir under hood, it can overflow! use baster to remove if needed)
11) Install pads, put brake quiet on back after installed
12) Slide caliper on, and install
13) Re-Install Tire

A couple of links I found useful:


Honda Pilot Front Brake Pads Replacement Guide - 2009 To 2015 Model Years - Picture Illustrated Automotive Maintenance DIY Instructions
 

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Only remove 1 caliper at at time. When you compress the caliper piston, the piston on another caliper could be pushed out of its bore if there is nothing holding it back, like a second clamp or the pads themselves.
 

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Nice write up. You missed step 11A where you swear as those springs on the pads go flying across the garage as you attempt to get them on the new pads.


I use an impact driver to get the screws that hold the rotor off. Makes easy work of it and less time then drilling them out.


I would add an additional step to properly seat the pads on the new rotors so you don't get pulsing when applying the brakes. If you purchase pre-scorched pads you can probably skip this, but you really want to burn off that resin from the pads so it doesn't build up on your nice new rotors.
 

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Nice write up. You missed step 11A where you swear as those springs on the pads go flying across the garage as you attempt to get them on the new pads.
Good point, although I opted to leave the pins out. They're for vibration, so I can put them back in next rotation if we hear noise coming from the pads.

I use an impact driver to get the screws that hold the rotor off. Makes easy work of it and less time then drilling them out.


I would add an additional step to properly seat the pads on the new rotors so you don't get pulsing when applying the brakes. If you purchase pre-scorched pads you can probably skip this, but you really want to burn off that resin from the pads so it doesn't build up on your nice new rotors.
Good tips for next time.
 

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Last Sunday, I did a brake pad and rotor job on our daughter's 2009 Pilot. My thanks for the many folks who provided “how to” steps through this forum and on YouTube. The information was very helpful. THANKS!

I came across some important items not covered in the procedures which need to be mentioned. First, there were comments about difficulty removing the front rotors with comments about using a big hammer, use of penetrating oil, etc. There are two M8 threaded holes in the rotors. Screwing M8 bolts in the holes and alternatively tightening the bolts will “jack” the rotors off the hubs. No hammer is needed. Second, the procedures mentioned removing brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir and then retracting the caliper pistons, forcing old, possibly contaminated brake fluid back into the reservoir. THIS IS A NO-NO. The old brake fluid may contain foreign material which can end up stuck in ABS controller valve/s and cause the MIL light to illuminate. Best practice is to put a line clamp on the brake hose and open the bleed valve, thus forcing the old fluid out of the caliper. The brake fluid is old, so it needs to be replaced anyway. Lastly, brake fluid specifications: DOT4 brake fluid is superior to DOT3, and doesn’t cost that much more. Always use DOT4
 
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