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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

My ‘16 EX-L AWD with 60k is having AC issues. It’s not blowing cold air. The compressor is engaging. I put gauges on the system and I’m seeing about 65psi on the low side and 75psi on the high side. Does anyone know what the correct pressure should be in these R1234YF systems? Outside air temperature is about 68 degrees F.

Thanks in advance.
 

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There should be a sticker under the hood that references the correct amount of refrigerant. Pressure is one thing, amount of refrigerant is another.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There should be a sticker under the hood that references the correct amount of refrigerant. Pressure is one thing, amount of refrigerant is another.
How else would you measure the amount of refrigerant in the system if not with a gauge set?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It looks like my compressor may be the culprit from what I’m reading as I have high (low side) pressure and low (high side) pressure. Any thoughts?
 

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Thanks. This chart references R132A but our Pilots use R1234yf. The troubleshooting chart at the bottom is still helpful.
 

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How else would you measure the amount of refrigerant in the system if not with a gauge set?
Once your compressor issue is resolved, a professional will pull a vacuum on the system for a half hour or so. This removes air, which also removes moisture from the system. Air/moisture kill a/c performance. The vehicle is then started and refrigerant by weight (on the sticker) is added to the system. Again, pressure is one thing, amount of refrigerant is another.
 

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Fully evacuated system takes 24oz of R1234YF refrigerant to fully charge. You should be seeing around 25psi on the low side and close to 200psi on the high side at 70F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much. I have to replace the compressor. I’ve read about people using R134-A instead of R1234-YF since it’s so much cheaper and has similar characteristics. I know it’s not technically recommend (environmental concerns and all) but are you aware of any other downside? I understand the process of pulling a vacuum on the system and holding it to ensure there’s no leaks before adding oil and refrigerant. I did this recently on my wife’s previous vehicle (‘06 Xterra). Thanks again.
 

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Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much. I have to replace the compressor. I’ve read about people using R134-A instead of R1234-YF since it’s so much cheaper and has similar characteristics. I know it’s not technically recommend (environmental concerns and all) but are you aware of any other downside? I understand the process of pulling a vacuum on the system and holding it to ensure there’s no leaks before adding oil and refrigerant. I did this recently on my wife’s previous vehicle (‘06 Xterra). Thanks again.
Hi Dave, can you give us an update? What did you end up doing? My 2017 started not blowing cold air. Thanks.
 

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Hi Dave, can you give us an update? What did you end up doing? My 2017 started not blowing cold air. Thanks.
Most common is a leak. Inspect the condenser through the front grille. Look for oily residue. I've had rock strikes cause a puncture.
 

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Most common is a leak. Inspect the condenser through the front grille. Look for oily residue. I've had rock strikes cause a puncture.
I just did. Did not see any oily residue. It can still blow cold air, but it's iffy. I guess I'll leave it as it is for now until it really starts not blowing cold air 100%. Is it a known fact that r1234yf is not as cold as r123a?
 

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I just did. Did not see any oily residue. It can still blow cold air, but it's iffy. I guess I'll leave it as it is for now until it really starts not blowing cold air 100%. Is it a known fact that r1234yf is not as cold as r123a?
I don't like any of the new stuff, but its not like we can do anything about it. If the compressor is functioning, I've put 2 to 3 oz in the system to see if it improves. If it does, then a very small leak is somewhere.
 

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Has anyone converted back to the r123a? The Ram dealership quoted me $700 to refill my r1234yf a few summers back. Maybe it's cheaper now, but still a ripoff.
 

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Does anyone know what the correct pressure should be in these R1234YF systems?
There should be a sticker under the hood that references the correct amount of refrigerant. Pressure is one thing, amount of refrigerant is another.
It's also located on page 640 of the Owner's Manual.

How else would you measure the amount of refrigerant in the system if not with a gauge set?
Refrigerant is added by weight using a scale under the refrigerant tank - not by pressure. Pressures help diagnose problems and verify correct operation.

I know it’s not technically recommend (environmental concerns and all) but are you aware of any other downside?
Doing so is considered tampering with an emission-related component and is a violation of the Clean Air Act. Anyone who knows if you introduced R-134a into an R-1234yf system might be financially motived by the $10,000 whistleblower reward. :)
 

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Also every 1234yf machine has an epa mandated refrigerate identifier in it. So when it detects other then pure 1234yf, it won't recover or vac the system, so it will be tough to find any reputable shop willing to ever work on your a/c again. We have sent many people away for this.
 

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Also every 1234yf machine has an epa mandated refrigerate identifier in it. So when it detects other then pure 1234yf, it won't recover or vac the system, so it will be tough to find any reputable shop willing to ever work on your a/c again. We have sent many people away for this.
I was just going to mention something like this. The new machines that charge 1234yf are very sensitive. If you convert the system it will pretty much guarantee any shop from working on your car ever again. Although they may be similar gases, the slight differences make a giant difference in the environmentally friendly systems. It may be expensive, but I’d rather drop $700 to charge my AC with a warranty than try to save a couple bucks now and suffer the consequences in a year when it fails, or you have any problem.
 

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Sorry if someone already mentioned this, the lubricants in R1234yf and R134a are different compositions. Putting R124a in a R1234yf system may damage/destroy some components in the system.
 

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Anyone can buy R-1234yf in containers of less than 2 lbs. without a license. This place currently has four 8 oz. cans for $115. The Pilot needs 3 cans. You can buy a vacuum pump, gauges, and refrigerant for less than $700.
 
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