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Looking for some advice here. We have a 2019 Touring AWD, and will buy the Transmission cooler. We're looking at travel trailers, and are huge fans of the Apex Nano 193BHS.

(I can't post a link to the specs since this is my first post, so here is a screenshot)
133228


3495 lbs Dry
4700 lbs GVWR (I doubt we'd ever come close to this, we'd probably only go to campsites with water hookups and dump stations, so I wouldn't expect to have full tanks while driving, and if it became a problem I'd take an extra car to carry the kids + cargo).
370 lbs hitch weight

Here is what the manual says for towing capacity:
133227


It looks like we could tow the load no problem (2 adults + 2 kids and a dog that combined are about 150 pounds).

My main question is the hitch weight. The OEM hitch says 350 pound tongue weight w/ 3500 pounds towing capacity, but that the capacity goes up to 5000 pounds with the transmission cooler. The manual says the max tongue load is 350 on 2WD, but is the same OEM hitch capable of 500 pounds on my AWD Pilot, or would I need an after market hitch?

Any concerns with being able to tow the trailer I mentioned? I see a lot of conflicting advice online as to whether or not a Pilot can tow a travel trailer comfortably (and that people should probably leave towing them to pick up trucks that have a much larger towing capacity).
 

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I would say you are right at the limits of what you could tow. These engines rev to make power, so if you don't like seeing high RPMs for extended periods it will be unnerving for you. Get your sway control dialed in properly and your weight distribution, get a good brake controller and have the trailer brakes dialed in.

My opinion when towing at the limits is you leave no room for error for your vehicles capability "overage" to make up for any poor setup, so you need to get your setup perfect and keep everything in top shape. I would also say when loading to the limit that you no longer consider left lanes, just take your time and get there when you get there.
 

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I agree with Cinto's commments, plus, here's is a few more - I have a 2018 Pilot AWD, with the factory towing package. I tow a Gulf Stream Vintage 19RBS travel trailer, 3300 lbs empty; gross weight of 4380 fully loaded, I usually only tow it at 4000 lbs loaded (2 full propane tanks, Marine battery, gear, etc., but no water in tanks) In the Pilot we have 2 adults and about 150 to 200 lbs of gear.
For your set up (like mine) you need a Class 3 hitch and receiver (see table below). I have a weight distributing hitch, brake controller, and sway controller (simple type). If you keep your speed to 65 or less, the engine rpms are not bad (with the transmission in "towing mode". My set up seems to sway a bit if I exceed about 68 mph, depending on the cross winds. I took this set up on several trips for the past 2 season. It works fine when I pay close attention to the hitch weight of the trailer and keep it under 500 lbs. It works even better if I keep it under 450 lbs. The suspension of the Pilot and trailer seem to respond to bumps and dips "as one" this way. Keep all the tires fully inflated. In order to get my trailer tongue weight down to 450lbs, while traveling, I put almost nothing in the numerour and spacious trailer storage comparments in the front third of the trailer, and load up the clothes and gear in the compartments over the trailer axle.

If you plan a lot of towing up and down the rocky mountains, the suspension, brakes and engine on the pilot will need to work harder than on the flat level ground in the Midwest. I've read on line that some like to leave a 20% safety factor in their towing set up.


133297
 

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I, too, have seen a lot of conflicting information concerning towing and tongue weight. I'm considering buying a Pilot next Spring and plan on towing my 4300 pound boat/trailer with it. I have yet to check the tongue weight on the boat but I suspect it's below 500 pounds. There would be only one person (the driver) in the Pilot and very little luggage.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether I would need WHD? If so, any suggestions on what to buy?

Thanks, Bob
 

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Is the hitch strong enough to support the weight? Probably.

Is the RAWR high enough to support a tongue weight over the maximum suggested tongue weight? Probably not. Throw in the dynamic load of towing and this exacerbates the problem. Maybe if I were hauling in the vehicle or on a hitch mounted rack I'd be more comfortable exceeding the tongue weight.

Exceeding the suggested maximums can get people really fired up, I personally don't like doing it but have done it for short distances locally at times. If I needed to tow the load regularly I'd get a more capable vehicle.

I, too, have seen a lot of conflicting information concerning towing and tongue weight. I'm considering buying a Pilot next Spring and plan on towing my 4300 pound boat/trailer with it. I have yet to check the tongue weight on the boat but I suspect it's below 500 pounds. There would be only one person (the driver) in the Pilot and very little luggage.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether I would need WHD? If so, any suggestions on what to buy?

Thanks, Bob
I'm not an expert on boat trailers and towing them, but I know they have a number of differences from a normal trailer that need to be considered. This question can probably be answered by someone on this forum who is experienced towing boats or on a boating or towing forum better than this forum.

All that being said, with my experience towing cargo trailers and campers, I'd be utilizing a WDH, just makes towing that much more comfortable and takes an extra 20 seconds to set up while hooking up the trailer. Again, you have to verify how applicable this is to boat trailers.
 

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I, too, have seen a lot of conflicting information concerning towing and tongue weight. I'm considering buying a Pilot next Spring and plan on towing my 4300 pound boat/trailer with it. I have yet to check the tongue weight on the boat but I suspect it's below 500 pounds. There would be only one person (the driver) in the Pilot and very little luggage.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether I would need WHD? If so, any suggestions on what to buy?

Thanks, Bob

Depends on how far you plan on trailering the boat. If you boat is under 24' and you are going less than 100 miles with no interstate driving, then I'd say probably not. Of course, it is something you could always test out first with a short trip to see how it handles before spending the $300-$500 on a WHD.
 

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Looking for some advice here. We have a 2019 Touring AWD, and will buy the Transmission cooler. We're looking at travel trailers, and are huge fans of the Apex Nano 193BHS.

(I can't post a link to the specs since this is my first post, so here is a screenshot)
View attachment 133228

3495 lbs Dry
4700 lbs GVWR (I doubt we'd ever come close to this, we'd probably only go to campsites with water hookups and dump stations, so I wouldn't expect to have full tanks while driving, and if it became a problem I'd take an extra car to carry the kids + cargo).
370 lbs hitch weight

Here is what the manual says for towing capacity:
View attachment 133227

It looks like we could tow the load no problem (2 adults + 2 kids and a dog that combined are about 150 pounds).

My main question is the hitch weight. The OEM hitch says 350 pound tongue weight w/ 3500 pounds towing capacity, but that the capacity goes up to 5000 pounds with the transmission cooler. The manual says the max tongue load is 350 on 2WD, but is the same OEM hitch capable of 500 pounds on my AWD Pilot, or would I need an after market hitch?

Any concerns with being able to tow the trailer I mentioned? I see a lot of conflicting advice online as to whether or not a Pilot can tow a travel trailer comfortably (and that people should probably leave towing them to pick up trucks that have a much larger towing capacity).

I just had the Honda Dealer install the OEM hitch on my 19 Touring AWD (along with the cooler and 7 pin wiring system). I had a fit when the hitch said 350 lbs TW and 3,500 lbs Max Towing Capacity (since I was told 5k lbs). The dealership didn't know crap about towing, so they called Honda. Long story short, they put that dang OEM sticker on every hitch that gets put on a Pilot or Ridgeline. Since those are the minimum specs for a 2WD, it also goes on the AWD's that get the Cooler and a 5k lbs rating. However, while I understand how the MTC increases with AWD and cooler, I don't understand how the TW rating would increase between vehicles. When Honda told me that the TW was 350 lbs regardless of the vehicle, I brought up the fact their manual says 500 lbs TW for 2 occupants and that a 350 lbs TW for a Class 3 receiver is awfully low anyways. Honda rep basically didn't say anything else other than go with the manual.

Long story short, from experience and the experience of others.....you will be fine towing your APEX. Just keep it under 4,500 lbs GVW. A good WDH will take about 50-80- lbs off the tongue anyways and distribute to the other axles, so you will be fine. I'd bet you will probably never be above 400 lbs TW with a good WDH and less than 4,500 lbs gross weight of the trailer. Traveling at 65 mph on the interstate shouldn't be a problem. Just remember that you need to service your tranny, AWD and oil more regularly if you are doing a lot of towing.
 

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I just had the Honda Dealer install the OEM hitch on my 19 Touring AWD (along with the cooler and 7 pin wiring system). I had a fit when the hitch said 350 lbs TW and 3,500 lbs Max Towing Capacity (since I was told 5k lbs). The dealership didn't know crap about towing, so they called Honda. Long story short, they put that dang OEM sticker on every hitch that gets put on a Pilot or Ridgeline. Since those are the minimum specs for a 2WD, it also goes on the AWD's that get the Cooler and a 5k lbs rating. However, while I understand how the MTC increases with AWD and cooler, I don't understand how the TW rating would increase between vehicles. When Honda told me that the TW was 350 lbs regardless of the vehicle, I brought up the fact their manual says 500 lbs TW for 2 occupants and that a 350 lbs TW for a Class 3 receiver is awfully low anyways. Honda rep basically didn't say anything else other than go with the manual.

Long story short, from experience and the experience of others.....you will be fine towing your APEX. Just keep it under 4,500 lbs GVW. A good WDH will take about 50-80- lbs off the tongue anyways and distribute to the other axles, so you will be fine. I'd bet you will probably never be above 400 lbs TW with a good WDH and less than 4,500 lbs gross weight of the trailer. Traveling at 65 mph on the interstate shouldn't be a problem. Just remember that you need to service your tranny, AWD and oil more regularly if you are doing a lot of towing.
May I know the price for the dealer to install the full Hitch Price? I feel the website price $ 1540 is a bit pricy and wonder if that's negotiable. Thanks!
 

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The hitch and wiring are pretty easy to install pending your skill level. Tranny cooler a bit more involved. Bernardi and College Hills were doing free shipping a week ago so getting it and DIY saves a lot. You could get all the parts and have local install also.
 

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I just had the Honda Dealer install the OEM hitch on my 19 Touring AWD (along with the cooler and 7 pin wiring system). I had a fit when the hitch said 350 lbs TW and 3,500 lbs Max Towing Capacity (since I was told 5k lbs).
That's the dealer's fault for not following instructions. The Honda towing package is supposed to include new stickers with updated capacity numbers showing the 500lb hitch and 5000lb towing capacity.
 

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The hitch and wiring are pretty easy to install pending your skill level. Tranny cooler a bit more involved. Bernardi and College Hills were doing free shipping a week ago so getting it and DIY saves a lot. You could get all the parts and have local install also.
Trans cooler you can DIY fairly easy too. I went OE because I didn't want anything attached directly to my AC Condenser or Radiator. These pics would be of great value to any fellow Piloteers out there who dare tow with a 3rd Gen. Here you go.....
134246
134247
 

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The hitch is NOT the only issue you need to be aware of .... Maximum GVWR tire weight limits need to be taken into consideration (weight limits stamped on sidewalls).
 

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The hitch is NOT the only issue you need to be aware of .... Maximum GVWR tire weight limits need to be taken into consideration (weight limits stamped on sidewalls).
I believe those OEM Bridgestone tires have a max inflation of 44psi. Id find some that can inflate to 51psi.
 

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May I know the price for the dealer to install the full Hitch Price? I feel the website price $ 1540 is a bit pricy and wonder if that's negotiable. Thanks!
I got it installed as part of my new car buy, so they kind of gave it to me free as an incentive. However the price they showed me for the install was right around $1,400, which is way high. You can buy the ATF cooler and there is a DIY on YouTube on doing it (though it looks to be a pain in the ass). The. Uhaul will probably install for under $500 for a class 3 receiver. However, you could probably buy the ATF and Hitch and take it to a mechanic to install for under $500 as well. WARNING: if you have an Elite or Touring it will cost more since you have a kick sensor that is in the way and has to be relocated to make way for the hitch. Honda sells a wiring harness that allows you to relocate the kick sensor to the right of the hitch receiver.
 

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  1. Me personally I wanted OEM. Everything bolted straight on like it was designed. If you DIY, you should be able to slash that price in half. Most aftermarket hitches stick below bumper. I didn't like that idea at all. OEM is a nice finished product.
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