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I am picking my new pilot friday (tomorrow)... Do i need to clay bar it prior to beginning Zaino process? I am new to Zaino... I am not a detail fanatic, but i do like to keep it shiny and clean...any help would be appreciated.
 

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The test is to run your fingers over the surface lightly after a wash. If you feel imperfections or any roughness, you should clay it. If not, it should be fine unless you have spots that aren't coming out with a regular wash.

Chris
 

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The best test is to put your hand in a baggie and then run your fingers across the surfaces. You'll be surprised at the tactile difference between baggie / no-baggie. Since the vehicle is new, you may only need to clay the top surfaces and not the sides...or maybe no claying at all if it didn't pick up lots of surface contaminants on it's way to you.
 

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I did not do the clay-bar thing either. Just the normal, Dawn wash (only for the first time), Z1, Z2 and then the Gloss-enhancer and it looks shiny.
 

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GACrabill said:
The best test is to put your hand in a baggie and then run your fingers across the surfaces. You'll be surprised at the tactile difference between baggie / no-baggie. Since the vehicle is new, you may only need to clay the top surfaces and not the sides...or maybe no claying at all if it didn't pick up lots of surface contaminants on it's way to you.
:32: 'zactly right.
 

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I did the clay bar thing

because new cars are often transported by train. As a result they get a lot of rail dust from the tracks. This is really dirt and dust mixed with small metal shavings from steel wheels running on steel tracks. There is also a lot of diesel pollution that drops on the vehicles. I figured that for 1 extra hour in the entire life of the Pilot it was better safe than sorry. You'll probably be ok if you don't but I just "feel" better having done it.:4:
 

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I did the clay bar and I thought it was relatively easy and quick to do. I guess my take is, while it may not be necessary, it certainly can't hurt. I seem to remember a post a while back ago from someone with a white Pilot that had very small rust like particles visible in their paint. I believe they or their dealer was able to get rid of it, but this could very well have been rail dust. A clay bar would be very helpful in removing these sorts of cantaminants.

Besides, if you are going to spend all that time and money to use Zaino, why not do it up the best you can?
 

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GACrabill said:
The best test is to put your hand in a baggie and then run your fingers across the surfaces. You'll be surprised at the tactile difference between baggie / no-baggie. Since the vehicle is new, you may only need to clay the top surfaces and not the sides...or maybe no claying at all if it didn't pick up lots of surface contaminants on it's way to you.
So exactly what are we feeling for? Sliding - no sliding? Dumb question for y'all I'm sure but....:8:
 

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> So exactly what are we feeling for? Sliding - no sliding? Dumb question for y'all I'm sure but....


Bumps...lots of little bumps...it's supposed to be smooth...if it's got "too many" little bumps, then the smooth-as-glass surface isn't what it needs to be for maximum shine. The little bumps are usually surface contaminants that the clay bar will remove.
 

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Thanks GAC...;)
 

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I just clayed the Pilot last week and I was amazed at the difference it made given how new it is. Even the spots that were protected by the shipping panels ended up much smoother. If you do the baggie test and you feel bumps or general grittiness, a claying will do you good. As rhammel pointed out, it's quick & easy. The most important thing is to keep the area lubed up with a quick detailer or soapy water. Be sure to follow up with a coat of wax (or polish and wax) as the claying process will remove some of the wax. If the last wax step would just make the required time too long, put it off for a week and wax it after a wash.

On Monday I gave it another wash and followed up with a quick detailer (Wizard's Mist N Shine). The results were a smooth, super slick finish.

Chris
 

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hondacuraworld said:
I used Zaino claybar on my 12 year old Civic and felt no difference :confused:

Maybe it's just on newer paint?
Are you saying you felt no difference in that it was already smooth, or that it still felt rough?

Also, experimenting with avatars today, are we? :D

Chris
 

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Clay Bars are AWESOME!:10:

First let me say this community is great! I really appreciate everyone being so helpful and sharing information about what has worked/not worked for them. Thank You! I'm the car person/fix-it person in my house. Yes, I do have a hubby, but he doesn't do that stuff. That means I'm the one trying to fix it, then I'm left wondering what the heck did I get myself into:eek:

My white Pilot had rail dust when I got it. I discovered the rust when I washed it for the first time. I checked my trusty HONDA-PILOT.ORG site and found the solution, a clay bar. I thought I'd give it a try and you know I got amazing results! I took a before/after pic (that I will try to post) and you can't believe the difference. It was so easy. In the future I'm going to clay all my new cars. My neighbors must think I've lost it.;) I just couldn't stop feeling the clayed paint and grinning from ear to ear. I've never felt anything like it. So smooooth, better than glass, kinda like a showcar. I followed suggestions here: Mothers Clay Bar kit(only used 1/2 the bar), then polished with Meguiars #7 and waxed with Meguiars #26.

I did find that the clay bar will sort of rub onto the car (leaving marks) if you don't use enough lubricant. I liked the fact that it sort of stuck to my hand, less chance of dropping it. Knead the clay bar frequently. If the bar falls on the ground, toss it immediately.

Oh yeah, did I tell you I love clay bars?:10:
 

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As an owner of a detailing business here's what I would recommend
for the average person's car care. As being a new car that probably
has been speed waxed for delivery I doubt clay baring would offer
any benefit for you although shurly won't hurt. A few tips:if your car
is a medium or dark color use the mild usually blue claybar, if it's a light or white you can use a more aggressive medium bar usually
red check your bars manufacture to be sure what you have. You
can use a clean soapy water as a lubricant or the spray lube that
may have accompanied your clay bar move in a straight line as you move the bar on the car front to rear preferred not circular or side to side if you see a brownish nicotine coloring transfering to the bar
keep going if it looks clean there is probably no need to continue.but
that's up to you.no harm no foul. clay bars are more for tree sap build up,road tars, bird duky,diesel soot build up that sort of thing.
rail dust has already been removed prior to delivery.

Next, I would use a professional grade wax and grease remover
you can get from a automotive paint supply and strip your car
completely of any waxes.

Then I would use a very mild polishing compound (swirl mark remover) applied either by hand or if you can an orbital buffer
at low speed 1800 - 2000 rpm with a non-abrasive pad some manufactures offer pre-wax conditioners to go along with there
waxes and polymers. these are great to fill in any minor flaws
in the finish and improve optical clarity.

If you don't like to wax frequently use a good quality polymer
or glaze they say there good for a year but I have found six
months is more like it depending on car color darker colors
maybe 5-6 months lighter colors maybe 6-8 months. also how your car is kept indoors/outdoors,how often it's washed and with what type of soaps carwashes are hard on waxes and polymers all these variables affect how well your waxings/polymers hold up.

A good quality carnauba (which also provide the best shine) don't
hold up well 60-90 days tops based on the criteria above. So if you don't mind waxing alot it's a good way to go. You can build up several coats as well.

I use polymers on my cars because I have found once the new car novelty wears off so does the amount of waxings. 2-3 times a year
is enough time spent,and my cars look great. so unless your a hobbiest with time on you hands who enjoys doing it frequently
consider polymers. You may want to look at properautocare.com
for more insightful info and to look at different products.


My thoughts on Zaino are: I am currently running a two car test one light and one dark going on a year now and have found that it for all
intent doesn't seem to hold up any better than any of the polymers out there,doesn't shine any better and is far more time consuming
to apply,so for all the hoopla surrounding it I give it a resounding thumbs down. hope this short dissertation helps. Brian
 

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Thanks DaMonk for the detailing insights! You bring up some really helpful points. We sure appreciate the info as we all want to take excellent care of our Pilots. I especially like the reminder to move in horizontal passes (no swirls here please);)
Unfortunately some of our Pilots have arrived with rail dust and removing it asap is important to maintaining the integrity of the paint. It's good to know a clay-bar works well on other contaminants too. Which brand clay-bars do you like best? I was wondering if you could use Dawn instead of the professional grade wax and grease remover? I might also be interested in using a quality non-carnauba wax, which would you recommend? Klasse? You're right, properautocare.com does have good info. Take a peek at autopia.org, they have good detailing info too. Thanks again, it's great to get feedback from a pro:)
 

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Should the Clay Bars only be used above certain temperatures? Any advice for caring for the paint job if you are taking delivery of your vehicle in the winter and live up north were the temp may not be above freezing for a while?

Thanks
 

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DaMonk said:


I use polymers on my cars because I have found once the new car novelty wears off so does the amount of waxings. 2-3 times a year
is enough time spent,and my cars look great.
I know what you mean about the newness wearing off. I did the same thing in the past but paying 30,000+ for a new car (more than my first home) may make me keep better care of it. What polymers do you use?? Is it something like Meguires 26 ?
Thanks for any info,
Bob :D
 

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No Friggin Way!!!!

Clay bars strip a layer of clearcoat/paint off - end of story! If your Pilot is new, there should be need to clay it. At the very most, you should use a mild cleansing prep-polish from any reputabile wax manufacturer.
 
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