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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a result of dealer fluid maintenance they checked the battery. It was marked as fair. In your opinion, should I replace, and if so, which battery is best. I’m retired and don’t put a lot of miles on it.
TIA
 

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After five years, replace the battery now/soon, especially if you happen to be in the snowbelt.
Get a Walmart EverStart Maxx battery.

If you don't drive much, a battery maintainer might be a worthwhile purchase.
One example is the Battery Tender product line from Deltran.
The least expensive one at Walmart is about $25.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After five years, replace the battery now/soon, especially of you happen to be in the snowbelt.
Get a Walmart EverStart Maxx battery.

If you don't drive much, a battery maintainer might be a worthwhile purchase.
One example is the Battery Tender product line from Deltran.
The least expensive one at Walmart is about $25.
Thanks
 

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The problem with older batteries is they can simply go without warning. Typical lifespan is four-five years and an extra year or two with AGM types. Recently, mine (6 years old) died while on my way to the vet for an emergency. It was fine the day prior. Fortunately there was another family car available. Imagine the guilt on that one. I use the DieHard Platinum AGM. It's the same price (with everyday coupon) as the Costco and Advance Auto will drop it in for free.
 

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I have a 2015 touring and mine gave up the ghost last year so I would definitely replace it.
 

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I watch mine and do an at-least-annual condition check via the specific gravity of the electrolyte. If any cells are low and don't respond to the "recovery" cycle on my super whamedyne hi-tech battery charger-maintainer, the battery gets replaced right away. I hate getting stranded by Stupid Stuff, and failing to replace a battery that is telling me loud and clear that it's not at full health certainly qualifies.

Batteries are too cheap to risk getting stranded for. In my experience.
 

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I’ll just say I’ve never proactively replaced a battery. For what that’s worth. When the car starts slow or I get a clicking that’s when I replace it. That may sound dumb, but I’m not super big on proactive replacement of stuff. Luckily I’ve never been stranded somewhere that I couldn’t get jump started by someone nearby. We don’t have extreme winters so that has not been an issue either.
 

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I'd replace the battery. The Honda has a pretty poor battery mgmt system and ours can kill a "fair" battery in no time if you assume that it'll quickly turn off the interior lights, headlights, etc.
 

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As a result of dealer fluid maintenance they checked the battery. It was marked as fair. In your opinion, should I replace, and if so, which battery is best. I’m retired and don’t put a lot of miles on it.
TIA
What @xGS said.
5 years is old for a battery.
Wal-Mart EverStart Maxx is a great battery for the price.
 

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I’ll just say I’ve never proactively replaced a battery. For what that’s worth. When the car starts slow or I get a clicking that’s when I replace it. That may sound dumb, but I’m not super big on proactive replacement of stuff. Luckily I’ve never been stranded somewhere that I couldn’t get jump started by someone nearby. We don’t have extreme winters so that has not been an issue either.

I'm pretty resilent, and tolerate minor delays like waiting fro the AAA driver and a jump-start. Meanwhile, mrs dr bob not so much.

More to think about: A tired battery takes more current and time to recover from starting, and from any load that exceeds alternaor capacity. Idling at the Taco Bell drive-through with lights and AC on a hot day? Battery may carry the car for a while, until the engine speeds up enough to replace the charge. Adding one of those $40 jump-start packs might seem like a solution, and while you can artificially extend a battery's life, the deterioration period is a real strain on the charging system.

I'm a little old-school, so check the charge density by measuring the specific gravity in the cells. tester is cheap (A few dollars at WalMart or the POLAPS). I do it annually, part of the hibernation recovery process before winter duty. Anyway, why wait the extra few weeks or maybe the month it takes for a weak batter to decide to strand you? Buy a new battery, your brand on your schedule, change it in the safety and confort of your own place, with your own tools and at your own schedule convenience. Vs. waiting in a frozen parking lot with she who has no patience for being stranded by stupid stuff. We are talking about a ddifference of a few weeks or maybe months, and you get to shop for a replacement at your convenience. Vs the one the AAA guy sells from the truck. Just sayin'...
 

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I'm pretty resilent, and tolerate minor delays like waiting fro the AAA driver and a jump-start. Meanwhile, mrs dr bob not so much.

More to think about: A tired battery takes more current and time to recover from starting, and from any load that exceeds alternaor capacity. Idling at the Taco Bell drive-through with lights and AC on a hot day? Battery may carry the car for a while, until the engine speeds up enough to replace the charge. Adding one of those $40 jump-start packs might seem like a solution, and while you can artificially extend a battery's life, the deterioration period is a real strain on the charging system.

I'm a little old-school, so check the charge density by measuring the specific gravity in the cells. tester is cheap (A few dollars at WalMart or the POLAPS). I do it annually, part of the hibernation recovery process before winter duty. Anyway, why wait the extra few weeks or maybe the month it takes for a weak batter to decide to strand you? Buy a new battery, your brand on your schedule, change it in the safety and confort of your own place, with your own tools and at your own schedule convenience. Vs. waiting in a frozen parking lot with she who has no patience for being stranded by stupid stuff. We are talking about a ddifference of a few weeks or maybe months, and you get to shop for a replacement at your convenience. Vs the one the AAA guy sells from the truck. Just sayin'...
You’re totally right....it’s just about the cheapest thing that’ll “break” that can leave you stranded.
 

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Ours is original in the '15... While I agree with @dr bob I don't replace until the starting cycle gets slower or I come out to a dead battery one morning. I keep one of the lithium ion jump packs in each vehicle, have used them a dozen times or so but not on my vehicles yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ours is original in the '15... While I agree with @dr bob I don't replace until the starting cycle gets slower or I come out to a dead battery one morning. I keep one of the lithium ion jump packs in each vehicle, have used them a dozen times or so but not on my vehicles yet.
While I used to wait until failure, at this point, I would rather trade a little useable battery service for waiting on a AAA truck in the middle of the winter! 😂
 

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While I used to wait until failure, at this point, I would rather trade a little useable battery service for waiting on a AAA truck in the middle of the winter! 😂
Grab a jump pack, they are not very expensive and extremely handy... how many times I've heard someone in a parking lot with the clicking sound and how happy they were that I could jump them in 30 seconds.
 

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I'll probably end up with a jump-start pack at some point. Mostly because it's safer than using jumper cables to start someone from the Pilot. I have to work hard to do something that runs the Pilot battery down between starts.

Meanwhile... Weak batteries tax the charging system a lot, trying to charge a battery that isn't willing to take it. The last months of a battery's life are hell on alternators. So add "avoiding $$ collateral damage" to the list of PM replacement benefits.
 

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I'll probably end up with a jump-start pack at some point. Mostly because it's safer than using jumper cables to start someone from the Pilot. I have to work hard to do something that runs the Pilot battery down between starts.

Meanwhile... Weak batteries tax the charging system a lot, trying to charge a battery that isn't willing to take it. The last months of a battery's life are hell on alternators. So add "avoiding $$ collateral damage" to the list of PM replacement benefits.
I agree with the logic... but very few people I've interacted with have ever actually had to replace an alternator... so... I probably won't change my behavior because I can't PM everything in the world. Maybe when the kids are off to college and I have the time to think about things like "how old is that battery?"
 

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I agree with the logic... but very few people I've interacted with have ever actually had to replace an alternator... so... I probably won't change my behavior because I can't PM everything in the world. Maybe when the kids are off to college and I have the time to think about things like "how old is that battery?"
Understand that the battery gets attention only after it shows weak in the annual fall SPG testing. The little testers are amazingly simple -- little colored balls float or don't when you draw a fluid sample up into the little eye-dropper. If a yellow ball in any cell doesn't float, I start my casual shopping effort. When red balls don't float, it's time to buy a battery. Very soon after a red-balls indication comes the slow cranking and failure. Getting a little advanced warning lets you shop for sales and plan a replacement in the comfort and convenience of your own workspace. I do the checking in the fall as we get ready for winter, avoiding the frozen fingers and other pleasant parts of winter work in a snow-packed grocery store parking lot. In my limited experience, stuff like this never gives up the ghost in the garage at home, on the same day you had planned to work on the car anyway. It shows up when you are trying to start the car to go somewhere, maybe in a hurry, and always with someone who has less than no interest in fiddling with the car to get there. Or back. Swapping in a battery is a much more pleasant experience than dealing with the rev limiter.
 
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