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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Of course, after almost 20 years, few would expect that a first generation 4 wheel drive SUV will last this long (engine/tranny/body/frame). But they did! Many are still going strong! Here is my 2005 subframe. Oh, my 05 engine/tranny are in good shape (aside from near misses--radiator failure and a few CELs late last year). Perseverance, vigilance, discipline and patience are the key to engine/tranny longevity--and we know that!. What's your secret in keeping the subframe of your first gen in good shape? Here are pictures of my 05 subframe. Thanks!
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If it's still holding together, then there is hope. An oily/waxy type undercoating can soak into the rust and slow down future oxidation. Paints or tar coatings won't help. I don't know anything about Eastwood products, they may be good. I am personally planning to use Fluid Film, which will soak in and slow/stop future rusting. It's a byproduct of wool processing, contains lanolin, smells like wet sheep, supposed to be excellent.
 

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yours looks good, I would apply Eastwood product annually:



I would also apply it to rockers, doors, etc.. the 24" hose makes it easy to apply
Great advice....

I have "suggested" vehicle owners do similar , .... see the responses here Rustproof - Undercoating - older vehicles

I have read lots of topics here on piloteers.org about undercoaing/rustproofing, and the majority of responses was negative. (against doing it).... good thing I don't always take "majority"s advice....
 

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Of course, after almost 20 years, few would expect that a first generation 4 wheel drive SUV will last this long (engine/tranny/body/frame). But they did! Many are still going strong! Here is my 2005 subframe. Oh, my 05 engine/tranny are in good shape (aside from near misses--radiator failure and a few CELs late last year). Perseverance, vigilance, discipline and patience are the key to engine/tranny longevity--and we know that!. What's your secret in keeping the subframe of your first gen in good shape?
IMO its time to arrest that rust going on underneath in order to keep this Pilot rolling. My rear bumper impact bar looks similar and leaves rusty potato chips whenever parked. Picked up a replacement rear bumper impact bar from Ebay for $120. The rear uni-body structure looks good but the rust could use some attention to keep it that way. The metal cover around the plastic gas tank could use some rattle can to slow down the surface rust.
First gen Pilots in the rust belt could benefit from rust proofing like FF or Eastman product as well as fresh water rinses after each salt bath. I've spent a lot of time under my Pilot this Covid period addressing these rust issues as well as rejuvenating the suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yours looks good, I would apply Eastwood product annually:



I would also apply it to rockers, doors, etc.. the 24" hose makes it easy to apply
Oh, thanks! Is this one of the secrets? I said in a previous post that my "secret" is to drive my cars in the rain (especially after snow when they salted the road). Been doing this for many years now. I just thought that the rain (its spray and mist) on highway speed will reach where the salt went. I live 2 miles from I-95 interstate so I visit my friends as an excuse. In the past four years, I spent a total of $5,700 in various repairs (ac compressor, starter, alternator, shifter cable, transmission range switch in 2016 and in 2019--new tires, brakes, radiator and rear shocks). I have always told myself after the major repairs and maintenance that if I could keep my Pilot for 2 more years, it will be worth it. So, from April 2016 to August 2020 (52 months), it is amounting to (music please!), $109/month. I think it has turned into a dilemma! Can you anyone explain why I'm starting to feel it's a dilemma? Thanks.
 

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I have heard good things about Fluid Film as well, they are non-hardening waxy coatings that do not trap moisture. I would absolutely stay away from the rubberized coatings that harden up and can trap the moisture. (I bought an old BMW that had this on it, the rust formed under the coating and ate up my rockers).

I like the spray wand that Eastwood sells since you can snake it thru the door drains, remove trim and spray in the rockers - actually drips out the rocker weld seams. When I did my Honda, I wasn't aware of the subframe issue. (but my doors look great lol). Also, makes sure you dont block door drain holes a turn your door into an aquarium.

I have 1/4" thick 4 x 4" square steel channel (inside measurement) that I cut one side out to make a U channel. When mine breaks loose I will it with use the thru the floor repair. I cant get the bolt out now....so just monitoring it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
IMO its time to arrest that rust going on underneath in order to keep this Pilot rolling. My rear bumper impact bar looks similar and leaves rusty potato chips whenever parked. Picked up a replacement rear bumper impact bar from Ebay for $120. The rear uni-body structure looks good but the rust could use some attention to keep it that way. The metal cover around the plastic gas tank could use some rattle can to slow down the surface rust.
First gen Pilots in the rust belt could benefit from rust proofing like FF or Eastman product as well as fresh water rinses after each salt bath. I've spent a lot of time under my Pilot this Covid period addressing these rust issues as well as rejuvenating the suspension.
Aren't gas tanks double hulled? Is there a risk of leakage? Thanks.
 

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Eastwood makes Por, several of my family members have had good success with this product on different applications.

Landscapers somewhat use Fluid Film religiously on the underside of lawnmower decks to stop/slow rust - it must be reapplied on a regular schedule.

Naval jelly is cheap and deactivates rust quickly, I use it often to refurbish woodworking and mechanics tools. It will help to preserve what metal you have - but must be coated with something (wax, paint, etc) because it won’t prevent future rust from forming on the surface.
 
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