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Discussion Starter #1
Recently bought a 2006 Pilot with 71,000 miles .. seeking to see if the Timing belt was changed at the Last Dealership on the Car Fax, Service manager sent me the Invoice as I requested to know everything done & proved I was the new owner.

We come to learn that a REMANUFACTURED ENGINE from LKQ was put in there at 62,000 miles... this was 2 yrs ago (9-17) ... so we have decided to wait this out.. before doing the Timing belt change ...maybe this summer, maybe next year.. see if this REMAN Engine gives us any trouble ...

Just wish there was a way to check this belt... inspect it ourselves. ... how much trouble is it to do this? I called a Honda shop but the charge would be between $200 -to $300 just to open it up and inspect it..
 

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It isnt hard to open the upper timing covers. You can inspect the belt, but this won't tell you anything, beyond that it exists. Belts are often removed with 150k miles on them and they still "appear" new. The external condition of the belt does not tell you much at all about the internal structural integrity.... so viewing it to try and determine if you should replace the belt will be a waste of time and energy. The only exception is that you could see if the belt has any oil on it from a leak, which will cause premature belt failure. But absent of any oil or visible defects (unlikely) you wont gain anything.

If you want to open the two upper timing covers:

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much for your reply Boom .... I will have my husband watch this...

The situation we find ourselves in is a sucky one with a Remanufactured engine put into this Pilot 10,000 miles ago.. I have no way of knowing with certainty that the belt was changed... or those dismantling this engine just kept the belt that was on there - and who knows when it was last changed... we are taking a chance..

The only reason we dont' want to Jump to change the belt right now is to see if any other issues may crop up with this Engine.... we haven't driven it much -yet. And we'd hate to have to pay to open the engine twice.

How about this question then.. for those who've had a BELT BREAK on them.. were there any warnings at all... like:
  • Engine Doesn't Start. ...
  • You Hear Squealing Sounds. ...
  • Engine Misfires or Runs Roughly. ...
  • You Hear Ticking/Clicking in Your Engine.
 

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No, belt breaks are almost always immediate, with zero warning, and catastrophic. Sometimes the belt just snaps, sometimes the tensioner fails to the degree that the belt is allowed to jump timing (and this might or might not be catastrophic depending on how much it jumps), sometimes a tensioner/idler pulley bolt breaks and this jams up and snaps the belt, sometimes a water pump bearing fails and if immediate and bad enough can damage the belt in short order.

The J35 V6 engine is an interference engine, meaning the valves will contact the pistons if timing is lost. When a belt breaks on these it always bends the valves. Then a new engine is required, or major head work (assuming the pistons are not damaged too badly)

The only one I had break was on a 4 cylinder non-interference engine. Going down the road at 65mph, then complete and total loss of power. Like turning the key off. Zero warning. Luckily, that engine just needed a new timing belt installed. Interference engines with timing belts are the devil.
 

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Boom is correct. You will not get a warning. If the belt breaks, the engine will simply quit running. When you then try to restart it, it will crank over but will not fire. The damage will be done already, with the pistons hitting and bending valves.

If sounds like you have no reliable information on the engine from LKQ. If they cannot tell you anything definite, then the belt may have 10,000 miles or 110,000 miles. There is no way to know. My 2 cents, plan on having the timing belt replaced promptly. Otherwise, you are rolling the dice. How lucky do you feel?

One last thought on your reman engine: most reman companies will clearly define what is replaced as part of their remanufacturing process. Do you have the LKQ stock number from the old dealer invoice? Perhaps call LKQ and try to get a straight answer.
 
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