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2007 Honda Pilot EX 4WD (J35A9)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2007 Honda Pilot EX FWD J35A9 (not a VCM engine) with 154,000 miles. The spark plugs are original. I'm thinking it's time to swap them out. From everything I read, NGK Iridium is the way to go. As far as I can tell, the NGK 3657 Laser Iridium's are my best bet. Rock Auto has them for $8.39 each before shipping.

Any advice for this maintenance item? Is it really necessary to replace the coil-on-plug boots as well?

I am concerned with breaking a plug off in the head, as well as stripping the threads in the aluminum head.
 

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2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
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I don't think people replace the coils proactively. They are technically a lifetime part.

Just take your time and be careful. I've never done them myself but I know there are tons of YouTube videos on how to do the swap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rock Auto recommends to also replace the boots, not the whole coil. this is the image"

143763
 

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Before you place your RockAuto order, remove each coil and inspect for oil in your spark plug tubes. If oil has saturated your coil(s) I would order a kit to put fresh rubber on your coils. These often swell if exposed to engine oil. Also, if you have oil in the tubes, it will be time to replace your valve cover gaskets, grommets and spark plug tube seals. I recomend the Fel-Pro kit to do this. Sold on RockAuto. One of these 2.
143764

May want to replace the intake manifold gasket if valve covers need to be removed.
 

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Over 235k miles on my OE coil packs, they're still working well and in good condition. I'd only replace them if there's actually something wrong with them.

I'm actually replacing my sparkplugs(NGK Iridium IX) later this evening, gonna try Denso Iridium TT plugs this time though. Nothing wrong with NGK, just wanna try something different.
If your sparkplugs are still the original and have never been removed before they might give you a bit of hard time. Always remove and torque them when the engine is cold.

Those rubber boot that goes at the end of the coil pack, make sure to use high temp adhesive when replacing them and dielectric grease on the sparkplug ceramic and outside wall of those boot. if you don't... next time you remove your coils, you're going to have to fish them out cause they'll stick onto either the sparkplug or tube wall. They' are only held onto the coil pack by a small lip and a bit of friction, factory assembly also used some kind of glue that got hard and brittle overtime.
 

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Over 235k miles on my OE coil packs, they're still working well and in good condition. I'd only replace them if there's actually something wrong with them.

I'm actually replacing my sparkplugs(NGK Iridium IX) later this evening, gonna try Denso Iridium TT plugs this time though. Nothing wrong with NGK, just wanna try something different.
If your sparkplugs are still the original and have never been removed before they might give you a bit of hard time. Always remove and torque them when the engine is cold.

Those rubber boot that goes at the end of the coil pack, make sure to use high temp adhesive when replacing them and dielectric grease on the sparkplug ceramic and outside wall of those boot. if you don't... next time you remove your coils, you're going to have to fish them out cause they'll stick onto either the sparkplug or tube wall. They' are only held onto the coil pack by a small lip and a bit of friction, factory assembly also used some kind of glue that got hard and brittle overtime.
The Denso Iridium TT gapped at .040 is a little tight.
 

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They can be adjusted with proper tool, but they're still within range so I don't think I'll bother unless I get a misfire or something. Beside the gap has tendency to increase overtime.
 

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They can be adjusted with proper tool, but they're still within range so I don't think I'll bother unless I get a misfire or something. Beside the gap has tendency to increase overtime.
Yes, the right gapping tool is important. These Iridiums can not be gapped with the old fashion tool that requires prying between the electrodes (you probably know this).
The problem I have with a .040 gap is these engines are already prone to foul plugs at .044 . A smaller gap can make it easier for an oil droplet to form between the electrodes, and yes your right, a misfire.
 
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