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Discussion Starter #1
Pilot is kinda heavy, so lets make some assumptions and start calculating.

wt about 4450 lbs
front/rear weight distribution 57/43 (from honda.com)
4 big adults x 200 lbs = 800 lbs
2 kids x 100 lbs = 200 lbs

4450 + 800 + 200 = 5450 lbs x 0.57 = 3100 lbs front axle
each wheel supports 1550 lbs in front

I start looking at wheels at local shops, surf to shops on web, most fitment guides give similar wheel styles as for typical FWD cars. Many styles available at 5 bolts 114.3 mm circle +42 offset. Then I start looking for load ratings for wheels, almost impossible to find. I called many manufacturers and find many of the styles I like are rated at 1400 lbs, which is fine for cars but is cutting it close for the Pilot.

For example, Iceman in July posted pics of some nice Konig Tantrum 17 x 8 wheels. I called Konig to check the load ratings and they are also 1400 lbs. 4450 lb vehicle + 200 lb driver gives 4650 total x 57% front weight ratio = 2650 lbs is 1325 per wheel.
This is fine but start adding people, cargo, tow things, jump off a curb....then what happens?

At max GVWR of 5950 lbs (from msn.auto) if all wheels are equally holding the weight then it is about 1490 per wheel. If you bias it with a 57% front ratio then it is 5950 x 0.57 divide by 2 = about 1700 lbs per wheel up front. In reality it would be somewhere between the 2 figures.

What load rating do you feel is the minimum necessary?

Am I missing something in my calculations? I realize there is a safety factor built into wheels for braking, cornering, etc.

Can one of you EX alloy owners check the back of your wheel to see what load rating Honda had stamped back there? I'm curious to see what Honda thinks is adequate.

Thanks








:confused:
 

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The ratio may be different.

The car's own weight distribution is .57 versus .43. But is the load distribution the same? People and goods are located in the center to rear area, right? But still, I share your concern. I went underneath the car but couldn't find any load rating on the rim.
 

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Re: The ratio may be different.

Unprejudiced said:
The car's own weight distribution is .57 versus .43. But is the load distribution the same?
No, it wouldn't be. Taken to the extreme, assume you put 1000lbs of cement on the hood*. It isn't gonna distribute 57/43 across the car :)

Interesting discussion BTW.

*example only - do not try this at home
 

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The GAWR is 2865 in front and 3155 in rear. 3155/2=1578. I'd add a safety margin..
 

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Had my wheels off today so could wax both sides of the rims. Here is all the info imprinted on the rims: HONDA MOTOR CO LTD, TOPY-J-DOT, 16x6 1/2 JJ45, S9V-665A, 8D14x17.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
seadog said:
Had my wheels off today so could wax both sides of the rims. Here is all the info imprinted on the rims: HONDA MOTOR CO LTD, TOPY-J-DOT, 16x6 1/2 JJ45, S9V-665A, 8D14x17.
Damn! A shop I called had an Enkei CDR-9 16 x 7 wheel and the guy pulled it out of the box and said it was stamped max load 1580 lbs on the back.

I guess either OEM manufacturers like Honda don't have to imprint the load ratings, or one of the sets of characters translates into a load limit.

Thanks for looking and reporting back what you saw anyway. Maybe I'll email Honda and see if they can enlighten me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Got off phone with American Honda about EX alloy wheel load limit. They didn't know, and will get back to me supposedly, said that information may be proprietary.

Pretty sure I'm going with ICW Racing 10-spoke tuners model 618S.
It's load rating is 1900 pounds per ICW Racing in 16 x 7 size.


Here's a pic borrowed from a Neon owner's web page.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I obtained a few more choices in the "stronger" alloy FWD offset rims. Ronal has a few beefy looking wheels (ronalusa.com). At least one of the designs, the 7-spoke R-28 is 790 Kg (1738 lbs) according to their surly technical rep I talked to. I believe the 10-spoke R-38, and 5-spoke R-7 are similar. ICW Racing (aka Primax) has at least 2 other strong designs, the 7-spoke 786H and 077M wheels, both at 1900 lbs. Although I liked the looks of Ronal wheels better (they are also OEM for some European cars), my local wheel shop couldn't obtain them, so I went with ICW 077M. I have pics in the gallery here
 

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I think you got this all mixed up. You calculate the weight like if you put more force than max load on these wheels, they will bend or broke.

When a pilot is parked, you can put another pilot on top of it and wheels won't break. Max load is a good reference number. But wheels can take lots more force while vehicle running around, sometime jump up and down:2: , hit road bump:3: ... Your wheel likely will survive all these.

A good advise, when your pilot is loaded, drive slow and don't jump a bridge.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
timchen said:
I think you got this all mixed up. You calculate the weight like if you put more force than max load on these wheels, they will bend or broke.

When a pilot is parked, you can put another pilot on top of it and wheels won't break. Max load is a good reference number. But wheels can take lots more force while vehicle running around, sometime jump up and down:2: , hit road bump:3: ... Your wheel likely will survive all these.

A good advise, when your pilot is loaded, drive slow and don't jump a bridge.
Lots of Pilot and MDX owners have upgraded their wheels with larger and/or different designs without regards to the strength of the new rims. There are certainly many more choices if you just go by appearance alone. You order from TireRack or Discount Tires Direct, and they will point you to the designs that will fit physically. During my research by calling manufacturers and visiting wheel shops, I found you CANNOT tell by appearance how strong an alloy FWD wheel is. Most are 1400 lbs, some a little more, some less even down to 1200 lbs per wheel. Now if the Pilot was built on a RWD truck platform, those type wheels can go from 2000 to 3000 lbs!

I still don't have any idea of the strength of the OEM steel wheels that came with my LX, or of the EX alloys. I called Honda, they sent me to TireRack, and nobody had that figure available. I figure a nice minimum load rating would be 1578 lbs as calculated by HOP23 above. Another way to look at this is with the tires Honda uses, they have a load index of 104 which gives max load at a certain tire pressure of 1984 lbs. I would personally prefer to have a wheel strong enough to approach or exceed the "strength" of the tire I use.

I have yet to read about catastrophic failures of alloys in normal use due to an overload situation, it's usually from hitting curbs, potholes etc, so yes there is an engineered safety margin built-in. I just didn't want to be driving around with some cool thin-spoked 1200 lb strength rims waiting to snap or bend when my fully loaded Pilot is bouncing around on a bumpy dirt road in a campground somewhere.

TIMCHEN, what's the load rating on the back of your 300zx rims?
 

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Need to find out that. But Z isn't thin either. 3400-3600lb plus 300+ hp. Some moded their Z to put out more than 600hp and still on stock wheels. 600hp, that's wheel snapping power we are talking about. No one broke their wheel yet, One did snap his driveshaft though.

I agree with you not to go too thin on SUV wheels, but I don't think heavy duty rims is really needed either. Real SUV have 6-bolts bolt pattern or more. (My passport was 6 bolts). By putting a 5-bolts pattern, Honda is telling you don't go too wild off the road.:eek:

The fact is, the force apply to wheel when off road (rock climbing) is much greater than on road by car weight. If you don't plan to go off road (real off orad, not just over some gravel), you don't need super heavy duty rim. Even you do have rims that look super heavy duty, can those 5 bolts hold? That's another question.
 

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One more piece of data to throw in here, from BBS:

The Honda Pilot fits into a special segment between a passenger car and SUV. The gross rear axle load is 3155 lbs, or 1577 lbs per wheel (713 kg). The front axle load is 2865 lbs or 1432 lbs per wheel ( 648 kg ).

The wheels I just purchased are rated at 650kg, TUV.

Also worth noting that the load rating should also be taken in conjunction with the certification used. TUV is the toughest, while the Japanese certification (can't remember the name) requires a factor of 10x fewer testing cycles. Net: not necessarily comparing apples/apples when comparing load ratings, FWIW.

Mods: might we want to move this to the Wheel/Tire forum?
 
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