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I am a traveling Respiratory Therapist. I was going to add a towing set up but a 22 ft Minnie Winnie deal fell into my lap. So now I am having to add a towing package sooner than later. I am getting confused about what I need. My thought is to buy Honda parts for what I can then get the rest of the set up I am not sure where. I was told to avoid UHaul who I had used previously.

my father is giving me advice but is actually confusing me more.

any clear information on what exact parts I will need?

I have been to he Honda dealership and I thought I understood but my father heard something else. Now I’m not sure.
is there a web site that will give me a list of parts that I will need?
 

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You definately need a hitch, transmission cooler and wiring harness and possibly a trailer brake controller. You will have the 9speed transmission so I think you have to purchase an OEM Honda cooler due to the proprietary fittings on the oil lines but you can go either way on the other parts. I personally prefer the OEM hitch as it goes through the bumper guard rather than below it and looks much better. You may be able to save some money going with the aftermarket wiring harness and brake controller though. You are limited to 5000 lbs towing though so as long as you stay below that you will be ok.
 

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Etrailer.com. you will need a transmission cooler (if the trailer is over 3500lbs), 7 pin wiring harness, and brake controller/booster.

The factory parts are going to cost you around twice as much as aftermarket.

I've got the curt hitch, red arc liberty brake controller, and tekonsha 7 pin wiring harness. All of them connect fairly easily.
 

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Going OEM will be more costly. The lower valance on the bumper will have be swapped out for the one designed to accommodate a hitch. An aftermarket hitch comes up under the existing bumper you already have. Definitely not pretty, but it works.
Just going by memory for OEM...
  • Lower valance
  • Hitch
  • Hitch Receiver w Appropriate Ball
  • Wire Harnesses Kit
  • ATF Cooler Kit
 

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If you are installing the hitch yourself, you will find that the threaded mounting holes on a 2016 will be rusty, and the new hitch mounting bolts will not thread in. You will need to purchase the correct metric tap and clean out the mounting holes before you install the hitch. E-trailer.com is a good resource, both for parts and for good DIY instruction videos.

There is also a Towing forum here on Piloteers. Check it out, lots of good information.
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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I am a traveling Respiratory Therapist. I was going to add a towing set up but a 22 ft Minnie Winnie deal fell into my lap. So now I am having to add a towing package sooner than later. I am getting confused about what I need. My thought is to buy Honda parts for what I can then get the rest of the set up I am not sure where. I was told to avoid UHaul who I had used previously.

my father is giving me advice but is actually confusing me more.

any clear information on what exact parts I will need?

I have been to he Honda dealership and I thought I understood but my father heard something else. Now I’m not sure.
is there a web site that will give me a list of parts that I will need?
I also am confused. Are you actually considering towing a Class C RV behind your Pilot? Or are you thinking you can tow the Pilot behind the Minnie Winnie??? The term Minnie Winnie refers to a Class C Winnebago.

This is the Minnie Winnie: Winnebago Product Models | Explore RV's & Trailers

The first thing that would be helpful would be to know what year and model of Winnebago you are actually talking about. If it is a Micro Minnie then you need to check out which year and model it is.

The longer Micro Minnie's, 22's, have a dry weight of between 3900 - 3950 pounds. That leaves you very little room for adding things you will need/want. The Pilot is rated to 5,000 lbs towing, but for the sake of your vehicle mechanically, especially if you will be towing a lot, the weight you tow should not exceed 85% of the towing capacity (80% would be better) or in this case 4,250 lbs. Can you reasonably expect to be able to put in the clothes, other personal items, pots, pans, dishes etc, food, water and propane and not exceed 300 pounds for all of that?

I'm not trying to be a Debbie Downer here, BUT it really sucks being broken down on the side of the road because a transmission shelled or an engine overheated somewhere between Timbuktu and Camel Hump, Egypt.
 

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I also am confused. Are you actually considering towing a Class C RV behind your Pilot? Or are you thinking you can tow the Pilot behind the Minnie Winnie??? The term Minnie Winnie refers to a Class C Winnebago.

This is the Minnie Winnie: Winnebago Product Models | Explore RV's & Trailers

The first thing that would be helpful would be to know what year and model of Winnebago you are actually talking about. If it is a Micro Minnie then you need to check out which year and model it is.

The longer Micro Minnie's, 22", have a dry weight of between 3900 - 3950 pounds. That leaves you very little room for adding things you will need/want. The Pilot is rated to 5,000 lbs towing, but for the sake of your vehicle mechanically, especially if you will be towing a lot, the weight you tow should not exceed 85% of the towing capacity or in this case 4,250 lbs. Can you reasonably expect to be able to put in the clothes, other personal items, pots, pans, dishes etc, food, water and propane and not exceed 300 pounds for all of that?

I'm not trying to be a Debbie Downer here, BUT it really sucks being broken down on the side of the road because a transmission shelled or an engine overheated somewhere between Timbuktu and Camel Hump, Egypt.
This should have been brought up 1st for sure. Pilots ar fine for light trailering, but if I were seriously looking to tow a heavy trailer on a regular basis, I'd look for something that doesn't have the engine and transmission mounted sideways under the hood. The Pilot is just not that great of a vehicle to tow with.
 
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This should have been brought up 1st for sure. Pilots ar fine for light trailering, but if I were seriously looking to tow a heavy trailer on a regular basis, I'd look for something that doesn't have the engine and transmission mounted sideways under the hood. The Pilot is just not that great of a vehicle to tow with.
Hey it's Sunday, I slept in. 😉
 

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Pretty simple. You can get everything from Honda but this is how I did my setup BUT, I would double check the weight on that trailer. I tow a 19' trailer that is about 4000lb loaded and on flat/low grade roads without winds it tows very good but on windy days, it can be tricky depending on your experience. I am pretty new to all of this, less than a year towing a travel trailer but the weight distribution hitch is basically a must for the pilot.

1: Ordered the OEM hitch from Honda Parts Guys online, great price and full kit includes everything I needed. I have the touring package and the valance cover and all was in the kit.

2: Had the dealer install the trans cooler and hitch wiring harness

This basically covers the Honda tow package.

Then you will need a brake controller. I personally use the Curt Spectrum one and love it. You will also need an adapter harness from Curt for the Pilot to avoid cutting and splicing wires. Install is plug and play. Mounted the controller to the parking brake bracket and the control know to the left of the steering wheel.

Next thing, be sure to get a weight distribution hitch. It is a GAME changer for stability. I use Equal-i-zer brand units. Sometimes I tow my trailer without the sway bars when I am taking it back to storage and it is a reminder how squirrely the trailer can get without the sway bars hooked up. It helps send weight back to the front wheels and controls sway so that the Pilot and Trailer move together rather than both of them zig zagging when you get cross winds or a big rig passes you too closely.

Since it seems you may be new to this all, youtube general videos on travel trailer driving tips and driving in the wind tips so you have some knowledge of what to expect.

Seriously though, pay attention to the weight of that trailer, I am worried it could be 1000lb over the Pilot's weight ratings. Keep in mind the Pilot can only do 5000lbs when there is one passenger. Adding people and gear lowers the trailer towing capacity.
 

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First thing to know is whether you have an awd pilot. If not, you are limited to 3500 pounds. If you are OK there I would recommend letting the dealer do the install. It may cost more, but each Pilot seems you have different parts requirements. I have had 2 Pilots done at the dealer and both were different. Right now I have a 2016 Elite awd and tow a 23 ft Gulfstream that weighs about 4000 lbs fully loaded. I have no problems towing and have been cross country and navigated all mountains with no issues. It really tows well. In addition to all suggestions you should have a weight distribution hitch and sway bar along with the brake controller. Note that the Pilot has a harness under the dash to connect the controller. Hope this helps.
One more thing. The 9 speed has paddle shifters which are a great help by using the engine to brake while descending steep grades while towing
 
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