Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I have a 2010 pilot touring. I am having a problem with ac starts blowing warm air all of sudden. It has been difficult to replicate but I believe it occurs on longer trips when car is on idle and sitting.
I have checked the ac clutch and condenser and they are all running. Relay was replace few yes back.
Last year I took to dealership and they tested for leaks and did not find anything.
Please help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,437 Posts
Is the blend door actuator operating normally?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
Has the cabin air filter ever been replaced?
Are the radiator fans functioning properly?
Are the A/C condenser fins clean?
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
187 Posts
My 2009 wasn't cooling for the first time last year. I also checked the relay. But all it needed was a can of Freon. which I added myself. I guess after 10 years some must of leaked out. It works great now. No issues.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,274 Posts
My 2009 wasn't cooling for the first time last year. I also checked the relay. But all it needed was a can of Freon. which I added myself. I guess after 10 years some must of leaked out. It works great now. No issues.
Yet. The AC system is a closed system. If you lost refrigerant then you have a leak. These systems will not heal themselves. R-134a is being phased out and may become hard to get. R-1234yf is the refrigerant now being used and the two are not interchangeable/mixable. If you plan on keeping the vehicle for any reasonable amount of time you should seriously consider having the problem fixed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,960 Posts
R-134a is being phased out and may become hard to get. R-1234yf is the refrigerant now being used and the two are not interchangeable/mixable
Perhaps I should stock up on a few cases of R-134a as my fleet of vehicles all run the same freon.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,274 Posts
Perhaps I should stock up on a few cases of R-134a as my fleet of vehicles all run the same freon.
You may want to. I remember the R12 phase out. Thing was by the time R12 got hard to find/expensive R12 used parts were getting even harder and more expensive to find. With refrigerant systems, parts ain't just parts.

I've seen a couple of youtube videos of uneducated folks switching their R-1234yf system to R-134. The first red flag should be having to buy a special connector to do so. There is a reason the different systems have different connectors. The two are not interchangeable nor are the mixable.

The bigger issue for them that they apparently didn't think about is that the R-1234yf system is designed specifically for that refrigerant, additives and lubricants. R-134 will destroy the compressor. So much for saving money on R134 when you now have to replace the compressor when it seizes. Plus the contamination can mean an entire system replacement. Not to mention that it is a violation of Federal Law under Section 203 of the Clean Air Act.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
187 Posts
Yet. The AC system is a closed system. If you lost refrigerant then you have a leak. These systems will not heal themselves. R-134a is being phased out and may become hard to get. R-1234yf is the refrigerant now being used and the two are not interchangeable/mixable. If you plan on keeping the vehicle for any reasonable amount of time you should seriously consider having the problem fixed.
Yes but it is a very very very slow leak to happen over 10 Years. Mostly likely happened over the winters when the seals get cold and dry from lack of use. I added one can before the summer last year and this summer it's still blowing cold. I used Dupont 134a for mobile ac systems it costs 6 to 12 bucks a can depending on where you buy it. You also need a AC hose kit for R134a.




Thats it. easy peasy and under 25 dollars. You could also just buy a can at autozone that has the adapter and pressure gauge built in and is disposable. My Pilot uses R134a so it won't damage anything. As far as the clean Air Act they are still adding refrigerant to homes with AC units that are 25 plus years old. Nobody want to spend thousands of dollars when the old system is still working fine. The clean air act was designed to slowly adapt new practices not make a person who spent thousands of dollars one year, and the next year his system is worthless. Makes no sense.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,274 Posts
Yes but it is a very very very slow leak to happen over 10 Years. Mostly likely happened over the winters when the seals get cold and dry from lack of use. I added one can before the summer last year and this summer it's still blowing cold. I used Dupont 134a for mobile ac systems it costs 6 to 12 bucks a can depending on where you buy it. You also need a AC hose kit for R134a.




Thats it. easy peasy and under 25 dollars. You could also just buy a can at autozone that has the adapter and pressure gauge built in and is disposable. My Pilot uses R134a so it won't damage anything. As far as the clean Air Act they are still adding refrigerant to homes with AC units that are 25 plus years old. Nobody want to spend thousands of dollars when the old system is still working fine. The clean air act was designed to slowly adapt new practices not make a person who spent thousands of dollars one year, and the next year his system is worthless. Makes no sense.
The point of 1234yf is to reduce the overall Global Warming Potential (GWP) of vehicles and the refrigerants that they use. R-134 has a GWP of fourteen-hundred and thirty times that of Carbon Dioxide. Inversely, R-1234yf has a GWP number of four times that of Carbon Dioxide. Beginning to see the difference here? If you switch your unit back to 134a you are actively harming the environment.

Air conditioning systems made since 2010 no longer rely on Freon. Most newer AC units use a refrigerant called R410A, or Puron. This chemical is an HFC (hydrofluorocarbon), but has been shown not to harm the ozone and, since 2015, has become the standard for residential air conditioning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is what the mechanic told me. There is some sort of moisture got in the system and he needs to replace expansion valve and evap coil to completely get rid of it.
Wants $800 for it.... Does it sound right???
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,274 Posts
For a dealers price I think that's about right. The're going to have to take the dash apart to get to the evaporator coil and shop labor is in the area of $125 to $150 per hour these days. An independent mechanic or AC shop would probably be cheaper as their labor is probably closer to $100 per hour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,437 Posts
This is what the mechanic told me. There is some sort of moisture got in the system and he needs to replace expansion valve and evap coil to completely get rid of it.
Wants $800 for it.... Does it sound right???
You could save a bunch if you DIY the new parts. Rockauto has A/C parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
I had my front expansion valve done a year ago as coil was freezing over leading to warm air blowing. Rear AC was working fine but front would blow warm after 20 minutes of driving or so. Same symptoms you had.

In addition to the expansion valve, we also got mode motor and driver mix motor replaced that were acting up. They also put a new drier in for good measure. Evap coil was inspected and looked fine - no need to replace in our case. Total cost for all those items was about $900. Without the mix and mode motors, it might have been $650-700.

If you want a lower cost approach, you could find someone who would evac system, filter refrigerant to remove moisture and then recharge. That might fix your issue. But if it doesn't you just threw $200 away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
This is what the mechanic told me. There is some sort of moisture got in the system and he needs to replace expansion valve and evap coil to completely get rid of it.
Wants $800 for it.... Does it sound right???
Sounds like they aren't sure what's wrong and are hoping this will fix it. If you have enough moisture in the system to ice the expansion valve, the dryer needs to be replaced as well, no amount of vacuum will pull the moisture out of the desacant. If moisture is your only problem, new dryer and a proper vacuum will cure it.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
187 Posts
This might help after you fixed your problem.. It also has some good links on finding where your problem is..

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Before you go spending a lot of money on repairs, you might want to confirm that the warm air isn't happening only under hard accelleration or going uphill. Under those conditions it is normal for the compressor to shut off so all engine power is available. I've felt warm air in as little as 10-15 seconds while accelerating on a long, uphill on-ramp to an interstate highway.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top