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You do not need to remove the spark plugs, and turning the engine isn't very difficult. It will feel like it's clicking into place meaning the ratchet will get easier to spin as you're going through the compression stroke. I have no idea how people here have changed timing belts with this kind of odd advice that makes the job more difficult than it needs to be.
I didn't say need, I said it makes the crankshaft easier to turn.
I don't mind being corrected. If you got a better way, please let us know.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I've done 2 timing belts like this with no issues, a quick blip of the air gun hasn't hurt it. 48ft lbs plus 60 degrees is probably 100+ ft lbs anyways.

You do not need to remove the spark plugs, and turning the engine isn't very difficult. It will feel like it's clicking into place meaning the ratchet will get easier to spin as you're going through the compression stroke. I have no idea how people here have changed timing belts with this kind of odd advice that makes the job more difficult than it needs to be.
I agree it is one longer step to do. However, Nail Grease is not in the wrong...
137564
 

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I've not changed the t-belt on the Pilot yet but I've done lots of other cars. I've always removed the spark plugs to do a timing belt. I agree you don't HAVE to, but it does make the crank easier to turn and that makes the whole thing a bit easier, especially when you're done and turning it through a few times to validate the timing. The plugs look like a pain on the Pilot so I may skip it this time.

One other tip that I've always done and I highly recommend to make sure you're NEVER OFF - count the teeth between a mark on each pulley. Basically you care about the number between banks and the number on the non-tensioner side. Yes it's a lot of counting but that way you can be 100% sure you're never off a tooth. The instructions assume you'll get the tension right on the non-tensioner sides of the belt and that after turning it you'll see if you're off a tooth so the instructions aren't WRONG, but leave some room for error and assume you'll catch it.

If you mark everything and count teeth, you'll never be off. I've done probably 10+ on various cars - and this tip has ensured perfection the first time each time.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I found the first time i removed the crank pulley bolt it took 1000 ft-lbs (650 didn't move it). Make absolutely sure your alignment marks are dead on, the rear cam is easy to get off one tooth - which from my unfortunate experience results in cold day start issues.
I've not changed the t-belt on the Pilot yet but I've done lots of other cars. I've always removed the spark plugs to do a timing belt. I agree you don't HAVE to, but it does make the crank easier to turn and that makes the whole thing a bit easier, especially when you're done and turning it through a few times to validate the timing. The plugs look like a pain on the Pilot so I may skip it this time.

One other tip that I've always done and I highly recommend to make sure you're NEVER OFF - count the teeth between a mark on each pulley. Basically you care about the number between banks and the number on the non-tensioner side. Yes it's a lot of counting but that way you can be 100% sure you're never off a tooth. The instructions assume you'll get the tension right on the non-tensioner sides of the belt and that after turning it you'll see if you're off a tooth so the instructions aren't WRONG, but leave some room for error and assume you'll catch it.

If you mark everything and count teeth, you'll never be off. I've done probably 10+ on various cars - and this tip has ensured perfection the first time each time.
That is a great idea! I'm very detail oriented like you so its a very good point that you brought up.

However, I'm not quite familiar with those 2 terms (banks and non tensioner side) Im sorry.. :/
Would you care to explain me otherwise please?
 

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You can actually forget the timing marks on your engine if you mark your old belt and mark your cams and crank gear to match. Then mark your new belt by counting teeth. (MIND BLOWN!) 😨
 

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What if it was a tooth off when he started, he needs to at least verify with the marks that it's correct.
That would certainly be advisable, but not necessarily necessary. 🤓
 

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Plausible explanation if it was running decent before the operation then runs like crap afterwards.
I always line my marks up. Marking your belt and counting teeth is my extra precaution. There are videos on YouTube of people using this method only, and honestly it works! There are plenty of cases where persons went by the engine marks only and ended up with a crappy running engine afterwards. Lol (not funny)
 

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I always line my marks up. Marking your belt and counting teeth is my extra precaution. There are videos on YouTube of people using this method only, and honestly it works! There are plenty of cases where persons went by the engine marks only and ended up with a crappy running engine afterwards. Lol (not funny)
1, 2, 3, "What did you say dear?" 5, 6.....
 

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Discussion Starter #53
You can actually forget the timing marks on your engine if you mark your old belt and mark your cams and crank gear to match. Then mark your new belt by counting teeth. (MIND BLOWN!) 😨
You can actually forget the timing marks on your engine if you mark your old belt and mark your cams and crank gear to match. Then mark your new belt by counting teeth. (MIND BLOWN!) 😨
137582
 

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Discussion Starter #54
I always line my marks up. Marking your belt and counting teeth is my extra precaution. There are videos on YouTube of people using this method only, and honestly it works! There are plenty of cases where persons went by the engine marks only and ended up with a crappy running engine afterwards. Lol (not funny)
That's what I feel like I'll be doing!
Thanks 👌🏽
 

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Can someone describe the tooth counting method, or point to a video that explains it clearly? I'm still not getting the concept, and don't know why it's not easiest to just line the marks up like the shop manual explains.
 

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Can someone describe the tooth counting method, or point to a video that explains it clearly? I'm still not getting the concept, and don't know why it's not easiest to just line the marks up like the shop manual explains.
I just remember watching enough YouTube videos you come across someone that uses that method.
But it is as simple as this...., Before removing your old belt, using a marker, you will make 3 marked points. Mark a tooth on the belt with a corresponding mark on each of the 2 cams and on the crankshaft gear. Remove old belt. Count the number of teeth between your marks and mark your new belt to match. Install new belt using the marks you made on the cams and crank gear.
When installing your belt, fit your belt tight on the right side leaving the slack on the tensioner side.
 

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Here is a picture to go with Nail Grease's explanation. Mark the belt in three places 1, 2, 3. It does not make a difference if you mark the high spot on the gear or on the belt but be consistent. I usually mark the high part on the gear and count the belt recesses between each location. Between 1 & 2, 2 & 3. Position 3 to 1 really does not matter because it is the slack side.
If you are doing it by yourself you can use something like a binder clip to hold the belt on the cam gear in the correct position while you finish positioning the belt.

137598


The reason I think this method makes things easier is a couple of things. First, it is sometimes kinda hard to look straight at the timing marks on a transverse engine. With this method you can put the marks where they are easy to see. Second, the cams will move ever so slightly when you take the belt off due to the pressure from the valve springs. Rather than having to make sure the timing marks are aligned as you turn the cam back into position while trying to put the belt on all you have to do is align the belt mark with the gear mark and it is in time. The cam gear will move back that small amount when you tension the belt.

I have done many of these and use to just use the timing marks. Now I use the belt mark method. Part of that could be due to my age and not being able to see as good as I did when I was younger.

Google "timing belt paint marks" and look at the images. That will give you a better idea of what it looks like.
 

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When I changed the T-belt, wp and tensioner the last time on my '07 Pilot, the kit did NOT come with a shim. However, I remember seeing kits with a shim. Has anyone else seen a kit that comes with a shim and where does the shim go?

And also, about replacing the timing belt. I used white nail polish (saw that on a vid somewhere) to mark the old belt and pulley. Then transferred marks to new belt. Worked like a charm, although getting the new belt stretched to get lined up was a little bit of work. I also counted teeth just to double check. Used the same procedure on my '05 Pilot.
 

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The shim is to correct an alignment problem that causes a chirping noise on some models. There is a TSB about it if I remember correctly. I think it was on some Accords but I don't remember off the top of my head. I know it does not apply to pilots.
 
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