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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last fall my Pilot would make a hissing sound when I would turn on the A/C. Then, later on the air would blow warm. I replaced the blower motor, changed the cabin air filter, vacuumed all of the crap that was in there out and I also replaced the air mix motor because I thought that was what was causing the noise.
Then I got the idea that the reason it was making that noise was because it was low on refrigerant. I bought a hose and can of refrigerant at Walmart and added 1 can to the system. The air blew cold and but still made the hissing noise. Now the compressor (I don't know if I'm calling it the right thing) no longer turns on. Now that the weather is getting warmer, I'd like to figure out how to troubleshoot and solve this problem as economically as possible.
I am debating whether I should take it somewhere and have them evacuate the system and then recharge it, while checking for leaks, but if there is anything I can do on my own first that would be preferred. Thanks in advance!
 

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Besides checking all the hoses and connections you can on your own, I think your next step would be to

take it somewhere and have them evacuate the system and then recharge it, while checking for leaks
..not necessarily in that order. :)
 

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Sounds like you have a leak somewhere in the system. It well could be that the compressor has gone bad. Either way, your best bet is to take it to the dealer or a good mechanic and let them diagnose and fix the issue.

The federal government is very involved it AC systems regarding the coolants they use.
 

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If the refrigerant charge is too low, the compressor will not kick in. Have a shop find the leak, and then you can get an estimate on the cost of repair.
 

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Don't know the year of your car, but it could be as simple as a dried / cracked O-Ring that is causing a slow leak.

Have a professional locate the leak and hopefully just recharge the system.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Don't know the year of your car, but it could be as simple as a dried / cracked O-Ring that is causing a slow leak.

Have a professional locate the leak and hopefully just recharge the system.

Good luck.
2008. If that makes any difference. I’d love it to be something cheap and easy.
 

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Getting some cold air after adding a can of refrigerant can be a good sign. As mentioned low refrigerant may not allow the compressor to engage. Last summer I picked up manifold gauges+vacuum pump from HF and was able to replace the compressor, accumulator, condensor then evac the system+ recharge. Sounds like you have a leak somewhere in the system. Good move not to use those quick A/C fixes in a can that are heavily marketed each summer.
 

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... Sounds like you have a leak somewhere in the system. Good move not to use those quick A/C fixes in a can that are heavily marketed each summer.
Agree.... Those ads never say to find / repair the leaks BEFORE using their miracle-in-a-can approach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Agree.... Those ads never say to find / repair the leaks BEFORE using their miracle-in-a-can approach.
I didn't use one of those. Just a plain can of R-134 refrigerant which I am sure probably did no good at all but I'm hoping it didn't do any harm.
 

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Just a plain can of R-134 refrigerant which I am sure probably did no good at all but I'm hoping it didn't do any harm.
Generally there should be a sticker under the hood stating the refrigerant type, capacity and type of oil. If you were very low one can would not likely have overfilled the system nor harm it.
 

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You can borrow a vacuum and gauges from AutoZone or local auto store. Hook up the gauges to see if it is low on refigerant. If it is low or doesn't have any then you would have a leak. You can also test this by vacuuming the system to a negative. Close the lines and turn off the vacuum to see if it holds the vacuum. To find the leak you can do a UV light test. Common leaks are at the valve stems, hoses, and compressors.
 
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