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Hello everyone. Does anyone have/can tell me where to get the transmission fluid change procedure for the 2016+ Touring/Elite 9 speed transmission fluid?

I know I am going to get a few ?life time? fluid arguments but not looking for an argument just the procedure or any place to find it.

Thanks!
 

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There's a guy in YouTube who goes by Brooklyn Bionic. He has a video on a 2014 MDX doing the tranny fluid change. I'm not able to watch it with audio and also not sure if he has the 6 or 9 speed at the moment. From the looks of it, it's as simple as an oil change.
 

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There's a guy in YouTube who goes by Brooklyn Bionic. He has a video on a 2014 MDX doing the tranny fluid change. I'm not able to watch it with audio and also not sure if he has the 6 or 9 speed at the moment. From the looks of it, it's as simple as an oil change.
The 2014 MDX has the 6 speed.
 

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9-speed uses HONDA OEM ATF-TYPE 3.1 fluid P/N:08200-9017 runs around $40 per quart, you will need 4 quarts for one drain/fill. Transmission must be at a certain temperature range when checking fluid level. Not your typical transmission service.
 

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There's a guy in YouTube who goes by Brooklyn Bionic. He has a video on a 2014 MDX doing the tranny fluid change. I'm not able to watch it with audio and also not sure if he has the 6 or 9 speed at the moment. From the looks of it, it's as simple as an oil change.
The 2014 MDX has the 6 speed.
I have changed the ATF in our 2014 MDX. It has the 6-speed. The 9-speed is completely different.
I just crawled underneath our 17 Touring. It's as simple as the one I posted done by the guy on YouTube. The tranny drain plug is easier to get to than the oil plug.
 

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I just crawled underneath our 17 Touring. It's as simple as the one I posted done by the guy on YouTube. The tranny drain plug is easier to get to than the oil plug.
Did you look at what you need to do to refill it to the correct level?

Your first clue might be the lack of a dipstick.
 

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I just crawled underneath our 17 Touring. It's as simple as the one I posted done by the guy on YouTube. The tranny drain plug is easier to get to than the oil plug.
Did you look at what you need to do to refill it to the correct level?

Your first clue might be the lack of a dipstick.
I haven't looked under the hood because it wasn't my focus at the time. I looked underneath only to see if there's a pan that needs to be removed and maybe a filter inside but I only saw a drain plug. My 12 Tacoma doesn't have a tranny dipstick and I'm aware that many others doesn't have one either. It isn't as complicated as you and others might think LOL.
I haven't looked In the manual what the fluid capacity is. I believe the guy in YouTube measured the drained fluid and put the same amount back. I don't know if it's the proper way. I haven't looked into it enough but as far as physically performing the maintenance, I think a monkey can do it.
 

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I haven't looked under the hood because it wasn't my focus at the time. I looked underneath only to see if there's a pan that needs to be removed and maybe a filter inside but I only saw a drain plug. My 12 Tacoma doesn't have a tranny dipstick and I'm aware that many others doesn't have one either. It isn't as complicated as you and others might think LOL.
I haven't looked In the manual what the fluid capacity is. I believe the guy in YouTube measured the drained fluid and put the same amount back. I don't know if it's the proper way. I haven't looked into it enough but as far as physically performing the maintenance, I think a monkey can do it.
Read the procedure I posted in post #3 of this thread, two days ago. That monkey better have a Honda HDS electronic scan tool.

The fluid in this trans has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, and the trans is sensitive to fluid level.

Maybe that's why you can't seem to find a monkey-friendly YouTube video for changing the fluid in this transmission. :rolleyes:
 

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One of the advantages of having the 9 speed trans replaced, free fluid change :)

I guess that buys "this monkey" a few extra miles before it is due and he has to decide to DIY or DIFM
 

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I haven't looked under the hood because it wasn't my focus at the time. I looked underneath only to see if there's a pan that needs to be removed and maybe a filter inside but I only saw a drain plug. My 12 Tacoma doesn't have a tranny dipstick and I'm aware that many others doesn't have one either. It isn't as complicated as you and others might think LOL.
I haven't looked In the manual what the fluid capacity is. I believe the guy in YouTube measured the drained fluid and put the same amount back. I don't know if it's the proper way. I haven't looked into it enough but as far as physically performing the maintenance, I think a monkey can do it.
Read the procedure I posted in post #3 of this thread, two days ago. That monkey better have a Honda HDS electronic scan tool.

The fluid in this trans has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, and the trans is sensitive to fluid level.

Maybe that's why you can't seem to find a monkey-friendly YouTube video for changing the fluid in this transmission.
Haha, When do you ever need a scan tool to change a tranny fluid? Yeah yeah... friction creates expansion. Of course, you don't check your tranny fluid level cold.
 

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I guess I used too many big words. This special ATF expands A LOT with heating. The scan tool is to use the vehicle ATF temperature sensor so you can get the temp into a narrow range. You also have to spin up the torque converter and check the level quickly before things settle again. Might be a bit easier on a lift with a helper rather than lying on your back under the vehicle.

But I never said it would be impossible to DIY this ATF fluid change. I just dont know why anyone would want to unless they are stranded on a desert island with their Pilot, thousands of miles from the nearest Honda dealer.

But like poorman, I too have some time to think about that, cuz I got new ATF at 40k miles nicely enclosed in a new transmission.
 

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Plus the 9 speed does not have a dip stick to check the fluid level, unlike the 6 speed that does.
 

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I guess I used too many big words. This special ATF expands A LOT with heating. The scan tool is to use the vehicle ATF temperature sensor so you can get the temp into a narrow range. You also have to spin up the torque converter and check the level quickly before things settle again. Might be a bit easier on a lift with a helper rather than lying on your back under the vehicle.

But I never said it would be impossible to DIY this ATF fluid change. I just dont know why anyone would want to unless they are stranded on a desert island with their Pilot, thousands of miles from the nearest Honda dealer.

But like poorman, I too have some time to think about that, cuz I got new ATF at 40k miles nicely enclosed in a new transmission.
Big words? Does that mean a dictionary is required to change the atf now?
 

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Now boys, let's play nice.

Does anyone know if Honda recommends flushing the ZF tranny while doing a fluid change? I could have sworn that my Service Foreman told me they do this. One thing for sure, even though I do most of my own maintenance on our vehicles, if I still have our Pilot when the next service needs to be done I will take it to my dealer & have it done. In the meantime, like Poorman, Wanderer, & several others, I got mine done for free with the tranny change @ 35,000 miles. Gotta love it... :grin:
 

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I'm a gear head and decent mechanic and have played with and raced cars and bikes for many years (35 or so). I may be over simplifying, but specs say a 9 speed fluid change in my Pilot Elite takes 3.5 quarts ATF Type 3.1. If you let the Pilot and new fluid bottles sit in the same garage for 24 hours to stabilize the temps and then you drain the fluid in a measurable container and put that exact same amount back in, how could this be complicated?

You have removed the thermal expansion variance by both the old and new fluid being the same temp. You have removed the need to measure because you replaced the used fluid with the same amount of the new fluid. What am I missing here?
 

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That sounds reasonable. Of course, those are famous last words. At the end of the day, it's your car, do what you want.

Usually it's recommended to change ATF or engine oil after the vehicle has been driven so that more of the particulates are suspended.

FWIW, it looks like checking ATF level in the Chrysler manufactured ZF 9-speed is just as convoluted as the Honda instructions for the ZF manufactured unit. But it looks like some Chrysler vehicles are nice enough to give you the ATF temp through the display.

 

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That sounds reasonable. Of course, those are famous last words. At the end of the day, it's your car, do what you want.

Usually it's recommended to change ATF or engine oil after the vehicle has been driven so that more of the particulates are suspended.

FWIW, it looks like checking ATF level in the Chrysler manufactured ZF 9-speed is just as convoluted as the Honda instructions for the ZF manufactured unit. But it looks like some Chrysler vehicles are nice enough to give you the ATF temp through the display.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_KZ_E_QzpU
I did notice the total capacity of the transmission is actually over 7 quarts. So a "fluid change" really only "changes" about 50% of the ATF Type 3.1.
 
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