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Thinking that changing my trans fluid on my ‘17 Touring would be a typical Drain and Fill, I went to the dealer to get fluid and a new crush washer. Come to find out, it’s no simple drain and fill! The 4 qts of fluid is around $150, and 3 new plugs, not drain plugs, plugs with no crush washer, are $25 each!! Plus, you need a lift because the fluid gets pumped in, and the engine revved to specific rpm’s and turning wheels in “S” mode, just ridiculous!! I asked the parts guy for a copy of the procedure which I am attaching to the post. I’m def not doing it myself. The dealer wants $390 to do it. Gets done every 60K. Unbelievable.
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I feel your pain.
That would be a difficult DIY project as compared to the simple drain and fill. My daughters have a 2012 Accord EXL and 2019 Pilot EXL and I do all the routine oil/fluid and filter changes including brakes.
Fortunately both vehicles have the easy drain and fill automatic transmissions. Having been used to having all Fords for 30 years, it surprised me that the trans filter is not serviceable unless transmission is disassembled.
 

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Not sure why Honda felt the need to change to this type of sealed system arrangement. I guess they were trying to prevent debris from entering the transaxle/promote the usage of the correct fluid. The cynical side of me says they did it to increase business for their dealers, but what mechanic would want to have to remove a plug on a hot, running engine to make sure the level is correct. Really a bad solution to a problem I didn't know existed.

My plan is to carefully measure how much oil comes out when I drain it, and then add that exact amount of new fluid back in. May still be very hard to do since I suspect that the level rises when the engine is shut off.

My vehicles only go to the shop for alignment and air conditioning work, but I may have to make an exception for this work!
 

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adg8165, read post numbers 12 13, and 17 of the linked thread below. This owner did it himself and said this is the way his dealer does it on the 9 speed transmissions. I'll be doing mine the same way as I've posted before. No slipping or abnormal transmission shifts so I believe the factory fill level is correct to begin with on my car. I also can buy the 3.1 ATF fluid from a dealer nearby for around $25.00 a quart. A typical drain and fill from what I have read is just a little over 3 quarts.

The dealer this owner went to also said they do not use new drain/level/fill plugs.

DIY 9 Speed Transmission Drain and Fill Easy Method
 
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Let's put this into persperctive, shall we?

At 20 MPG and $2.40 per gallon, you'll spend $7,200 in gasoline over that same 60,000 miles. $390 to change the transmission fluid seems like a relative bargain!

For the average person driving 12,000 miles per year, that's a $390 expense every five years or $78 per year or $6.50 per month. Cutting out one hamburger per month will save more than it costs to replace the transmission fluid. :)
 

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This "overflow plug" seems to be pretty common on German transmissions, I've seen it on multiple VWs. The 9 speed is designed by ZF, a German company. I always liked the NAG-1 Mercedes transmissions, they had a serviceable filter AND a drain plug in the pan so you didn't make a hugenormous mess. But of course my mom's Wrangler with the NAG-1 doesn't have the drain plug. Thanks Jeep!
 

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Let's put this into persperctive, shall we?

At 20 MPG and $2.40 per gallon, you'll spend $7,200 in gasoline over that same 60,000 miles. $390 to change the transmission fluid seems like a relative bargain!

For the average person driving 12,000 miles per year, that's a $390 expense every five years or $78 per year or $6.50 per month. Cutting out one hamburger per month will save more than it costs to replace the transmission fluid. :)
What a way to look at it this way..Thanks.. I'd Better tell my wife to start saving for this expensive maintenance..
 

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What a way to look at it this way..Thanks.. I'd Better tell my wife to start saving for this expensive maintenance..
Yes, along with saving for the mandatory timing belt replacement around 105000 miles, LOL! First car we have owned that this is called for and we are expecting to keep it at least that long.
 

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They left out the part where you hop on one leg and cluck like a chicken!

This tranny is garbage! I'll keep my 6 speed thanks!! I feel for you and anyone who bought that tranny.
 

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I don’t get the complaints about this transmission fluid change. Not worth the risk of not doing it correctly $390 is not a lot in the grand scheme of things. Plus you bought a $40,000+ vehicle so it shouldn’t be a huge issue. Also I’d consider pushing it to every 100,000 miles or something like that.
 

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I hope you don't think that what kind of car you drive reflects your "financial means" because anybody can get a car loan. And just because someone doesn't like bells and whistles and the increased number of problems that can arise from them doesn't mean they don't have the money. 6 speed is good and everyone seems to like the 9 and 10 speeds as well. Either way, fluid changes are required for both so it shouldn't really matter.
 

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I don’t get the complaints about this transmission fluid change. Not worth the risk of not doing it correctly $390 is not a lot in the grand scheme of things. Plus you bought a $40,000+ vehicle so it shouldn’t be a huge issue. Also I’d consider pushing it to every 100,000 miles or something like that.
I think a lot of people want everything to be as easy as it used to be... one thing that will never happen as cars get newer is things being as easy as they used to be, that's for sure.
 

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Also, fluid changes are required about twice as often on the 6-speed (every ~30,000 miles after the first ~45,000 miles) compared to the 9-speed (every ~60,000 miles) which brings maintenance costs for the two closer together.

My biggest beef with the 9-speed at this point is the time it takes to downshift for passing. I'm less concerned about its reliability and shift feel.

6 speed is good and everyone seems to like the 9 and 10 speeds as well. Either way, fluid changes are required for both so it shouldn't really matter.
My 2019 Ridgeline required replacement of its 6-speed transmission at 14,000 miles last month, so they're not all good. ;)
 

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Also, fluid changes are required about twice as often on the 6-speed (every ~30,000 miles after the first ~45,000 miles) compared to the 9-speed (every ~60,000 miles) which brings maintenance costs for the two closer together.



My 2019 Ridgeline required a transmission replacement at 14,000 miles last month, so they're not all good. ;)
Don't go reading his thread on the Ridgeline forum, you'd think the 6 speeds are really not good at all with the number of people having them replaced.
 

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Some us have the financial means and satisfaction of owning a new Honda with it's many modern features.

With hard work and luck, hope you'll be able to upgrade your situation some day....
I have a new Honda. There's nothing wrong with my financial situation. You like talking down to people I see. I'm probably smarter and make more money than you my friend. Just because I make good money doesn't mean I'll buy garbage just because I can afford to fix it. Enjoy your money pit!
 

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Drain, measure drained fluid, put the same amount of new fluid. Note: leave both new and old fluid in the same room enough time to equalize/adjust to sorrounding temp.
I could do or get a lot of things for $390 minus the parts, but you cant beat that price when a quart of fluid cost $25 or above.
 

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They left out the part where you hop on one leg and cluck like a chicken!

This tranny is garbage! I'll keep my 6 speed thanks!! I feel for you and anyone who bought that tranny.
No need to apologize lol.
What a way to look at it this way..Thanks.. I'd Better tell my wife to start saving for this expensive maintenance..
It's great to look at it this way but it's different when you actually put into action as far as sacrificing a little each day. If you smoke, one or two less stick isn't happening lol. I wouldn't want to stop my daily dose of a good Starbucks coffee as well. But it really isn't about the grand scheme of things. It's all about DYI and the benefits are just the icing on the cake...just my 2c.
 

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Also, fluid changes are required about twice as often on the 6-speed (every ~30,000 miles after the first ~45,000 miles) compared to the 9-speed (every ~60,000 miles) which brings maintenance costs for the two closer together.

My biggest beef with the 9-speed at this point is the time it takes to downshift for passing. I'm less concerned about its reliability and shift feel.



My 2019 Ridgeline required replacement of its 6-speed transmission at 14,000 miles last month, so they're not all good. ;)
my in laws have the 6 speed pilot and we have the 9 speed. The 9 speed is much snappier and nets several more mpg. These days a 6 speed auto is archaic.

I will likely find an Indy shop to do the fluid change or just do it myself. The drain and fill makes logical sense. Put in what you take out. I have a bmw and the directions for maintenance are as ridiculous as this tranny - I just follow logic and all is well.
 
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