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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it worth 30¢ more per gallon?
Benefits?
 

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Benefits: A slight performance/mileage gain that you would probably not notice. I have my doubts that the milage gain would be worth the 30¢ difference. Only way to tell is to try and see.
 

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You vehicle may have been made when they began using this 'stuff'. Many weren't. Hence them not going above 10% usually.
What a load of crap it is to use ethanol for motor vehicles.
Without the exact quote- it takes something like 13 gallons of fresh water to make 1 gallon of ethanol. Changes/drives up the price of corn often also.
Lots of cons to this argument, few pros.

In a nearby county, the non ethanol gas, both premium and regular are the same price.
Don't know why they're jacking it where you are?

The ONLY real reason why I'd run it in ANY vehicle, is if I was storing it a few months or longer? Ethanol, any amount, is very hydrophillic, hence attracting moisture as it sits around in a tank.
 

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I have several vehicles I use that are older than that.
They seem to do just fine with the 10% ethanol. I've heard they can even handle 15% before problems?

Thanks for correcting me on the ethanol/water thing.
 
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I have several vehicles I use that are older than that.
They seem to do just fine with the 10% ethanol. I've heard they can even handle 15% before problems?

Thanks for correcting me on the ethanol/water thing.
Not so much a correction as an update. It used to take more water. The other thing that isn't thought about is that the water used to make ethanol can and is then used to make cattle feed, as is the mash from the production. The water use to make gasoline has to be recycled, at a high cost to purify it to make it useable for any purpose.

The issue with ethanol in older vehicles is on the parts in the vehicle especially the fuel system and fuel delivery system. The older rubbers and metals can corrode with ethanol use, where as modern engines are built with components that ethanol will not effect.
 

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Is it worth 30¢ more per gallon?
As others have said, no. You won't get 12.5% better mileage, assuming your gas costs $2.40. You won't get better reliability from a Honda V6.

Additionally, you're paying your local refiner extra to avoid contributing to the US farm economy. Your individual decision is invisible in the grand scheme of things, but few cents on the price of corn can make a big difference to folks that make a living from farming. For Exxon, the extra profit is a rounding error.
 

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All of my carb'd engines get E free or get double doses with Sta Bil. All of my modern vehicles state in the owner's manual how much E they can handle (E10 or E15) so I try to stick to E10 pumps. If I had a "newer" vehicle that doesn't talk about E10 I would try to get it E free but that station is 40 mins from my house so I probably would stick E10 in it and hope for the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I should have clarified that my two OP questions were asked so a discussion would insue and focus on the benefits of using "ethanol free" gasoline in an internal combustion engine. Even more specifically, how it effects the performance, and does using this fuel preserve a Honda V6 engine. Some of us use VCM disabling devices to protect our investment, improving longevity.
142238
 

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If you waqn
I should have clarified that my two OP questions were asked so a discussion would insue and focus on the benefits of using "ethanol free" gasoline in an internal combustion engine. Even more specifically, how it effects the performance, and does using this fuel preserve a Honda V6 engine. Some of us use VCM disabling devices to protect our investment, improving longevity.
View attachment 142238 .
If you want to experiment with pricier fuel, try a couple of tankfuls of Shell V-Power NiTRO+ Premium.
It has a higher level of detergent additives above and beyond that necessary to meet the top tier requirements.
Shell V-Power NiTRO+ Premium Gasoline
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you waqn

If you want to experiment with pricier fuel, try a couple of tankfuls of Shell V-Power NiTRO+ Premium.
It has a higher level of detergent additives above and beyond that necessary to meet the top tier requirements.
Shell V-Power NiTRO+ Premium Gasoline
We use Shell quite often. 👍
 
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I should have clarified that my two OP questions were asked so a discussion would insue and focus on the benefits of using "ethanol free" gasoline in an internal combustion engine. Even more specifically, how it effects the performance, and does using this fuel preserve a Honda V6 engine. Some of us use VCM disabling devices to protect our investment, improving longevity.
View attachment 142238
I can't say for certain what year range, but any Pilot rated to use E10 or E15 (or E85 if any are) will not have their longevity impacted appreciably IMO. The computers are designed to alter the timing so no adverse timing issues (knocking) occur. The injectors and fuel lines are all designed to handle the ethanol. In a vehicle driven with some frequency (meaning doesn't sit for 3-4 months at a time) gumming is not an issue.

Regarding economy and performance, it's been proven that E fuel provides more power but less economy.
 
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View attachment 142237


While in theory I agree with much of what you said, if you are buying a modern/new vehicle I would have no concern with running E10 as modern engines have been engineered to used E10. If you vehicle is 10 years old or older or is carbonate I would not use and ethanol, but in a newer vehicle I have no concerns.
I agree 100%, plus in the manual it specially states (3rd Gen. Pilots) were designed to run gasoline up to 15% Ethanol...so not only could you run 10% Ethanol 15% would be perfectly ok. Now, would I do that, that’s a different question.
 

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I can't say for certain what year range, but any Pilot rated to use E10 or E15 (or E85 if any are) will not have their longevity impacted appreciably IMO. The computers are designed to alter the timing so no adverse timing issues (knocking) occur. The injectors and fuel lines are all designed to handle the ethanol. In a vehicle driven with some frequency (meaning doesn't sit for 3-4 months at a time) gumming is not an issue.

Regarding economy and performance, it's been proven that E fuel provides more power but less economy.
Sorry my friend, but me thinks that you have the last statement backwards.

"One of the researchers who worked on that study, Wendy Clark, told Midwest Energy News that E10 contains about 3 percent less energy than gasoline, and E15 contains about 5 percent less energy. That means in order to be sold on an energy-equivalent basis, E15 needs to be priced at about 2 percent less than E10."

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Sorry my friend, but me thinks that you have the last statement backwards.

"One of the researchers who worked on that study, Wendy Clark, told Midwest Energy News that E10 contains about 3 percent less energy than gasoline, and E15 contains about 5 percent less energy. That means in order to be sold on an energy-equivalent basis, E15 needs to be priced at about 2 percent less than E10."

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If the E10 and E15 blends are truly the octane rating posted... I know E85's true octane rating is over 100, which allows the vehicle to run more aggressive timing and provide more power than running its specified octane rated fuel. So I'm willing to admit I may be wrong with E10 and E15 but I'm not wrong with E85...
 
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Octane has long been misunderstood. Higher Octane does not mean more energy. Higher Octane is use to mitigate pre ignition in higher compression engines.

Myth
Octane boosts will increase horsepower in all cases.

Fact
This is the most common fallacy. Octane boost does not increase the energy value of gasoline. Higher octane simply keeps the fuel/air mixture from igniting too early in the face of high compression. When met with high compression and extreme heat, lower octane gasoline can actually ignite before the engine spark occurs. This can cause pre-ignition, engine knock and pinging. In extreme cases, these maladies can cause serious engine damage. Rather than burn hotter, fuel with increased octane actually ignites in a more orderly fashion when met with high compression chamber pressures.


The reason E85 is so high in octane is that Ethanol has a nature octane rating of 108.6. It is actully diluted down by the amount of gasoline in the mixture. E85 can contain between 51% to 85% Ethanol and legally be labeled E85.

The only time high octane will boost power is when it is used in vehicles that are factory-tuned for high octane fuel, engines that are modified for higher compression (such as aftermarket cylinder heads) or when ignition timing is advanced.

This is a good article with a real world test of E85 vs Gasoline.
 

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So I'm willing to admit I may be wrong with E10 and E15 but I'm not wrong with E85...
Neither of you is wrong, but the comparison is apples and oranges.

Alcohol has a higher octane rating. It can run successfully in very high compression engines (supercharged, for example) where the more volatile fraction of standard gasoline would pre-ignite.

On the other hand, alcohol has less energy per volume than gasoline. What makes it work better in an engine that can take advantage of it is that it will burn more smoothly and completely from a higher initial compression point.

Both of these are illustrated by common experience: igniting a puddle of alcohol won't throw a fireball and the flame is cooler. Igniting a puddle of gasoline is... exciting.

In an older engine that doesn't compensate, the ethanol in E10 is providing less combustion energy than the gasoline it replaces. However, it's adding oxygen to the mix in the cylinder to promote more complete combustion and less air pollution.

Daltongang has provided a good resource if anyone wants to do the homework.
 
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