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I can get a great deal on snow tires put there 235/50R/18. Want to make sure they will work before buying. Thank you for the help.
 

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It's not that they won't fit. It's a narrower tire. That lessens stability. Increased chance of a rollover.
 

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It's not that they won't fit. It's a narrower tire. That lessens stability. Increased chance of a rollover.
But, a narrower tire is usually better in snow.
Of course, you must already know that given your vast winter driving experience.
 

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But, a narrower tire is usually better in snow.
Of course, you must already know that given your vast winter driving experience.
Well dont stop at 235 then.
142833
 

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This is what you get when you are taking a curve at 75mph in the snow.

142834


Since the OP is asking about snow tires it is probably more relevant to the OP to find the best tires for driving in the snow, not some hot summer road.
 

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This is what you get when you are taking a curve at 75mph in the snow.

View attachment 142834

Since the OP is asking about snow tires it is probably more relevant to the OP to find the best tires for driving in the snow, not some hot summer road.
The OP asked if they will work. I said they will fit but gave the negatives of doing so. The OP should not feel that it's all gain. The vehicle is designed to ride on...
245 65r17
245 60r18
245 55r19
245 50r20
265 35r22
 

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The most obvious change evident in the new tire will be the diameter. The new tire is over 2" shorter than the original which means your speedometer will show significantly higher than actual speed. Also possibly minute benefit in fuel economy from lesser weight and a lower distance in the torque moment from the hub yada yada yada
Other than that, there shouldn't be any fitment issues, which I assume is the main question.

The new tire would Not increase the chance of a rollover...
 

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The new tire would Not increase the chance of a rollover...
Though the difference between 245 and 235 is small, it's a matter of physics. The narrower tire will increase the chance of a rollover when making evasive maneuvers or if you find yourself sliding of on an embankment. SUVs being more top heavy than a sedan are already more prone to rollovers. A wider tire can prevent that.
 

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Though the difference between 245 and 235 is small, it's a matter of physics. The narrower tire will increase the chance of a rollover when making evasive maneuvers or if you find yourself sliding of on an embankment. SUVs being more top heavy than a sedan are already more prone to rollovers. A wider tire can prevent that.
Did you ever try to cut tree with baseball bat? If you use axe, contact area of its edge is smaller, meaning pressure is higher and you will be more successful than with bat. Narrow tire tend to dig in snow and perform better then wide tire. Snow and ice nullifies positive effect of wide contact area due to low friction, and pressure plays a greater part.

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Yes it is a matter of physics as well as common sense. You should always drive to the conditions and snow is not a condition where anyone in their right mind would ever be pushing their speed to the extent that a roll over could or would be imminent.

Contact patch of a narrow tire is longer (in the direction of vehicle travel) and narrower laterally. This helps the tire break through a layer of snow, slush or water when driving on highways. The longer contact patch must keep the weight of the vehicle over any given point longer, which pushes the tire down more and squeezes snow or water out better.

Rain tires used on race cars are often narrower than dry tires, for the same reason.

When driving on the street in light snow or slush, narrow tires break through the snow and water down to the pavement underneath. If the tires can engage the pavement, the vehicle gets much more grip compared to engaging snow, slush or water.



Snow driving — Because there is low friction on the road, having greater pressure on the road is more important than having more surface area. Therefore, narrow tires perform better when the roads are covered with snow, since they can dig deeper into the snow, providing more traction.

 

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Though the difference between 245 and 235 is small, it's a matter of physics. The narrower tire will increase the chance of a rollover when making evasive maneuvers or if you find yourself sliding of on an embankment. SUVs being more top heavy than a sedan are already more prone to rollovers. A wider tire can prevent that.
you're on the right path with the wrong application. the matter of physics that you referenced is a roll moment dependent on a vehicle's track distance, not the tire width. A tire half the size of another will be no more prone to causing rollover, if the track distance is the same.
In this case, the track distance totals less than 1/5" difference, which would likely be nullified by the stretched tire's reduction of sidewall flexion.
the point is, its not the width of the tire, but how wide the total track of the vehicle. 10mm is irrelevant compared to the 1700mm track of the vehicle. if we're going to argue physics, we should at least know the proper physics behind the principle being discussed.
 

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you're on the right path with the wrong application. the matter of physics that you referenced is a roll moment dependent on a vehicle's track distance, not the tire width. A tire half the size of another will be no more prone to causing rollover, if the track distance is the same.
In this case, the track distance totals less than 1/5" difference, which would likely be nullified by the stretched tire's reduction of sidewall flexion.
the point is, its not the width of the tire, but how wide the total track of the vehicle. 10mm is irrelevant compared to the 1700mm track of the vehicle. if we're going to argue physics, we should at least know the proper physics behind the principle being discussed.
There's a reason monsters trucks use wide tires. Even then, they push the limits and end up upside down.
 

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Did you ever try to cut tree with baseball bat? If you use axe, contact area of its edge is smaller, meaning pressure is higher and you will be more successful than with bat. Narrow tire tend to dig in snow and perform better then wide tire. Snow and ice nullifies positive effect of wide contact area due to low friction, and pressure plays a greater part.

.

Yes it is a matter of physics as well as common sense. You should always drive to the conditions and snow is not a condition where anyone in their right mind would ever be pushing their speed to the extent that a roll over could or would be imminent.

Contact patch of a narrow tire is longer (in the direction of vehicle travel) and narrower laterally. This helps the tire break through a layer of snow, slush or water when driving on highways. The longer contact patch must keep the weight of the vehicle over any given point longer, which pushes the tire down more and squeezes snow or water out better.

Rain tires used on race cars are often narrower than dry tires, for the same reason.

When driving on the street in light snow or slush, narrow tires break through the snow and water down to the pavement underneath. If the tires can engage the pavement, the vehicle gets much more grip compared to engaging snow, slush or water.



Snow driving — Because there is low friction on the road, having greater pressure on the road is more important than having more surface area. Therefore, narrow tires perform better when the roads are covered with snow, since they can dig deeper into the snow, providing more traction.

Thank you for the analogy. The link is more for those considering going to a wider tire. My point still remains. The OP does give up fuel economy and stability by going to 235 50-18. The vehicle is not designed to ride on this size tire although they may gain ice and snow traction. I'd look for the correct size tire. I know you would too.
 

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That reason is traction/grip. Did you read my response?
So your saying this is no more likely to rollover in an evasive manner or off on an embankment
142839

Than this....
142840

This is an extreme difference but I'll keep my wider tire and look for the same size snow tire as my vehicle calls for.
 

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So your saying this is no more likely to rollover in an evasive manner or off on an embankment
Than this....
This is an extreme difference but I'll keep my wider tire and look for the same size snow tire as my vehicle calls for.
I see you still didn't read my reply. I am saying that if those skinny tires were spaced to achieve the same vehicle track width as the lower picture, then yes, it would be no more prone to rollover.
Build two tables the same width, height, and weight as each other, with one having wider legs than another. One will not be easier to overturn than the other. Because physics.
 

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Thank you for the analogy. The link is more for those considering going to a wider tire. My point still remains. The OP does give up fuel economy and stability by going to 235 50-18. The vehicle is not designed to ride on this size tire although they may gain ice and snow traction. I'd look for the correct size tire. I know you would too.
Yet you use an example of a vehicle that is definitely not designed to use monster tires. Perhaps this a thread that should elude you as the two main criteria the op is concerned with are SNOW and WILL THE LISTED SNOW TIRES WORK.

The first being snow, I suspect that your deep south Texas familiarity of driving in snow is quite limited.

The second being the tire size, while not the OEM size, if they fit the wheel with no problems, the wheel fits the brakes and rotors with no problems, which in this case the OP is using from all appearances the OEM wheels. As long as the tire does not rub or interfere with the operation of the steering then they too will work.


The fact that the OP is looking at snow tires indicates that the OP has an understanding of driving on snow, in snowy conditions for which the first rule is too SLOW DOWN, there by mitigating the non applicable roll over concerns. Again simple physics,
 

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I see you still didn't read my reply. I am saying that if those skinny tires were spaced to achieve the same vehicle track width as the lower picture, then yes, it would be no more prone to rollover.
Build two tables the same width, height, and weight as each other, with one having wider legs than another. One will not be easier to overturn than the other. Because physics.
Wider footprint = more stability. Center the tires equally as you wish.
 

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Yet you use an example of a vehicle that is definitely not designed to use monster tires. Perhaps this a thread that should elude you as the two main criteria the op is concerned with are SNOW and WILL THE LISTED SNOW TIRES WORK.

The first being snow, I suspect that your deep south Texas familiarity of driving in snow is quite limited.

The second being the tire size, while not the OEM size, if they fit the wheel with no problems, the wheel fits the brakes and rotors with no problems, which in this case the OP is using from all appearances the OEM wheels. As long as the tire does not rub or interfere with the operation of the steering then they too will work.


The fact that the OP is looking at snow tires indicates that the OP has an understanding of driving on snow, in snowy conditions for which the first rule is too SLOW DOWN, there by mitigating the non applicable roll over concerns. Again simple physics,
🤦‍♂️
Would you buy 235 50r18 snow tires for your Passport if you had 18in rims, whether on deal or not?
 
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