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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone else had a problem with condensation inside the headlight unit? I have 15,000 miles on my Pilot and I noticed condensation inside one of the lenses. I took it took the dealer and they replace it under warranty. I drove it home in a rain storm and noticed the other one had condensation too. The dealer has order the part. Seems odd both would have a bad seal. I just wanted others to be aware while they still have warranty coverage.
 

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Has anyone else had a problem with condensation inside the headlight unit? I have 15,000 miles on my Pilot and I noticed condensation inside one of the lenses. I took it took the dealer and they replace it under warranty. I drove it home in a rain storm and noticed the other one had condensation too. The dealer has order the part. Seems odd both would have a bad seal. I just wanted others to be aware while they still have warranty coverage.
I thought I noticed that too but thought my eyes were deceiving me. Will check again - thanks for sharing!


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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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Not particularly odd if you have LED headlights. Xenon and Halogen headlights get hot. Heat burns off moisture. LED headlights do not get hot. The LED base module gets hot but the lights run cooler than conventional headlights.

Wait until winter comes and you drive in a heavy winter snow storm. The snow will not melt off of the headlight. It was brought up in several automotive forums this last winter. For snow, Pam cooking spray or WD40 seems to be the advised item to spray on them so the snow will not stick. Not sure what you can do for condensation other than replace them and hope for the best.
 

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Not particularly odd if you have LED headlights. Xenon and Halogen headlights get hot. Heat burns off moisture. LED headlights do not get hot. The LED base module gets hot but the lights run cooler than conventional headlights.

Wait until winter comes and you drive in a heavy winter snow storm. The snow will not melt off of the headlight. It was brought up in several automotive forums this last winter. For snow, Pam cooking spray or WD40 seems to be the advised item to spray on them so the snow will not stick. Not sure what you can do for condensation other than replace them and hope for the best.
I've noticed this also. The headlights get covered in winter. My town also switched to LED traffic signals. The get coated so bad you cannot see the lights sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not particularly odd if you have LED headlights. Xenon and Halogen headlights get hot. Heat burns off moisture. LED headlights do not get hot. The LED base module gets hot but the lights run cooler than conventional headlights.

Wait until winter comes and you drive in a heavy winter snow storm. The snow will not melt off of the headlight. It was brought up in several automotive forums this last winter. For snow, Pam cooking spray or WD40 seems to be the advised item to spray on them so the snow will not stick. Not sure what you can do for condensation other than replace them and hope for the best.
Why would there be moisture in a sealed unit to begin with? I'm not trying to argue but trying understand. There should be no moisture inside the unit if it's sealed properly. By the way, the cost to replace one unit was $1200.00.
 

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2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
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Well you don't indicate what Pilot you have, ie Year, model. Be that as it my, most headlight units are not completely sealed air tight. My 2020 Passport Touring is full LED however it is not airtight. The headlight unit is supposed to be sealed from outside moisture penetration such as rain, but on the engine compartment side they are not airtight.

If it is not airtight humidity can and will cause condensation under the proper conditions. This is more prevalent in humid locations than dry ones. As I'm typing this I checked and the humidity in central New York State is 61%, on a sunny day with 86 degree temp.

Older no LED headlights would get hot and burn off the condensation, as well as keep ice, sleet or snow from collecting on them in the winter. LED's, since they do not develop heat at the bulb end do not do this.

In the "good old days" the headlights were sealed, as they were not bulbs installed into a fixture. The were the entire headlight that would fit into a frame. If they leaked they burnt out.

7" headlight
137898



Is it possible you had a two bad headlight units. If it's under warranty and the dealer is replacing them you good. That however does not mean that it will last. While I like my full LED headlight setup in my Passport, I do not like the fact that LED's do not produce enough heat to keep them clear of ice, snow, sleet and condensation as xenon and halogen bulbs would.
 

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Though I am a bit late, here is something to share.

Our composite headlights not sealed. There are vents in the back that allow for air flow.
Headlights cracking, but not visibly apparent could be from transport to the dealership or reshuffle at the dealership. Thought it could have happened a long while ago, problems will surface miles down the road (no pun intended). I do not suspect that it is a headlight's manufacturing process, as the issue is on both sides.

Good thing that the dealership was able to swap it without much hassle.
 
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