Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
I also live in the SF Bay Area and have dealt with this issue on other AWD cars. I'll suggest picking up cheap wheels and ignore the sensors, but if the dash light bothers you consider getting something that can take or has sensors. (NOTE - I haven't tried driving my 2018 Pilot without wheel sensors). For snow tires look for what they used to call "turnaround tires" -- tires that someone bought new and then realized they aren't using them or sold the vehicle. Get the actual studdable (but unstudded) snow-rated tires with the snowflake stamp so you aren't required to chain up in most conditions.

Real snow-rated tires will be softer and have a different feel from the harder All Season tires, but I actually liked driving in rain with them as my stopping distance was much better. You'll have to swap the set of wheels & tires at the start and end of ski season, but if you take care of the snow tires they should last a number of seasons. If you don't like the trouble or the ride, sell 'em on Craigslist -- there's always a demand for snow tires on rims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
edit: corrected tire designation
I'm in the Bay Area where it only snows once every 30 years!

The major roads are plowed pretty frequently, it's only on snow the last few miles leading to the resort.

Thank you!
I'm from the Central Valley and have made 12 trips to Colorado Springs in all kinds of weather. Granted my '06 is not a direct comparison, but like you when it was new, I tried to over-think what I needed. I even bought a set of cable chains because of sometimes being on not so well traveled roads (like US50 across NV, UT) (they have never been out of the box). Always carried a tow strap, small shovel, kitty litter, and other essentials. I traveled plenty of non-plowed roads in NV, NM, and CO. Never a problem. And I saw plenty of stranded vehicles that couldn't handle the conditions. I never had any special tires either. But when I had the Michelin Latitude Tour M+S, they were amazing even on icy conditions.
So I would suggest, don't buy anything in the way of extra wheels/tires. You should be fine.
I also have a '19 Passport Touring, but haven't had a chance to take it through snow yet. Can't imagine ANY CA condition where it wouldn't do well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
I'm from the Central Valley and have made 12 trips to Colorado Springs in all kinds of weather. Granted my '06 is not a direct comparison, but like you when it was new, I tried to over-think what I needed. I even bought a set of cable chains because of sometimes being on not so well traveled roads (like US50 across NV, UT) (they have never been out of the box). Always carried a tow strap, small shovel, kitty litter, and other essentials. I traveled plenty of non-plowed roads in NV, NM, and CO. Never a problem. And I saw plenty of stranded vehicles that couldn't handle the conditions. I never had any special tires either. But when I had the Michelin Latitude Tour A/S, they were amazing even on icy conditions.
So I would suggest, don't buy anything in the way of extra wheels/tires. You should be fine.
I also have a '19 Passport Touring, but haven't had a chance to take it through snow yet. Can't imagine ANY CA condition where it wouldn't do well.
I agree with all this. You should be fine. Unless there is a super snowstorm in Tahoe (rare), you should be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
If Caltrans has the chains sign out, with your AWD you must have all-weather (not all-season) or all-terrain tires (snow tires), and be carrying chains (must be available if need) to be permitted to continue.

More info here:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
I don't want to drive people crazy and have others think I'm overkill (I am). I look at helping others learn like it's my kids lives at stake and from the emergency response side. Others brought up a good fact with the emergency kit with strap/shovel etc. Also look WHERE you will attach if needed front and rear. much easier in daylight dry driveway than stuck in snowbank late night.

The video from jeffpilot49 is a bit more of a difference as the others are summer tires not even all season. It's the same idea and if you do have summer tires it's like a plastic toboggan.

Tirerack has videos with the all seasons vs winter, all good to watch . a/s vs. winter and AWD A/S vs winter and the others TR winter videos

Now also mentioned and good CAjack42, typeshige and all should read. Here are the links with the information on how the tranny modes work. Ridgeline is same basic system as Pilot.

Ridgeline tranny modes -try them on dry ground and snowy parking lot if possible. light throttle, full throttle.

normal vs sand

18" snow

Learning about the traction and stability control and how to turn off and when applies to almost all cars now. Unfortunately 99% never read the manual or even understand it. You can explain to your family & friends. Ask about the "button" normally left side of steering wheel and what it does.

at least in the 2019's, not sure about 2020 the tranny modes only apply to EX-L, Touring, Elite. Honda didn't see fit to give that to the lower paying LX and EX customers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Thank you everyone! I started looking around for 18 inch Pilot/Ridgeline wheels but haven't found the right one yet. They seem to be either too expensive or too beat up. It doesn't seem like people can drive without putting curb rash on their wheels. Sigh.

So this is what I decided to do: This is probably not optimal on the low profile 20s, but I searched and found one with the Three Peak Mounain Snowflake symbol on an all-weather tire that comes in 245-50 20 size. The Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady seem to be good in snow and decent overall.

I intend to leave them on until they wear out, then I'll put the stock Continental Crosscontact LX Sports back on and try to find 8Jx18" OEM Honda wheels for dedicated winter tires. This should buy me a year or two of time!

With an experienced driver, the stock tires might be fine. I'm not experienced. Also, according to Tire Rack, the Continental Crosscontact LX sports are pretty bad in the snow. (I have flashbacks of going to Truckee with my friend's dad's brand new Mercedes ML430 and him hitting the guard rails since his all seasons weren't up to the task. He had AWD of course but we learned an important lesson about tires that day.)

Just in case, I also got the recommended chains, but from what I am reading, Caltrans will see that I have AWD + all weather (3PMSF) tires and let us go without having to put on the cable chains.

Since we plan to go only once a month (if that), maybe what I did was the best solution for us. Time will tell.

Thanks again, I learned a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
I just read the Caltrans chain page linked above. I guess they don't necessarily car about the 3PMSF symbol but they might look for the M+S label. It also says you're supposed to have chains with you all the time just in case no matter what kind of vehicle and tires you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
I think you are making a wise choice to at least upgrade, grab the recommended chains as well and you'll be set!

I'd definitely take the accident with the ML430 as a warning, those early ML classes (I had an ML320) were absolute beasts in the snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I see the OP asked if the "stock tires" are any good in snow.

I scanned the thread, but didn't actually see the brand/model of the "stock tires" mentioned.

Which makes me curious... what "stock tires" do you guys get down in the USA?

Here in Canada we get Continental "CrossContact LX Sport". I'm wondering if they are the same across the board, or if they use different tires from the factory depending on region of delivery.

I'm not usually a big fan of OEM factory installed tires, but honestly, I'm shocked at how good these are on ice and in snow. We've had a few winter storms here already, and quite a few glare-ice mornings, and these Conti's have been awesome. In fact, better than the Goodyear Nordic winter tires that I had on my previous Sienna. Granted those were 10 years old (but still with tons of tread left).

...Although if you look at the reviews on TireRack of these Conti's it would appear that my opinion is not shared by many. Maybe my expectations are just low? But IMO I think these are pretty good so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
I see the OP asked if the "stock tires" are any good in snow.

I scanned the thread, but didn't actually see the brand/model of the "stock tires" mentioned.

Which makes me curious... what "stock tires" do you guys get down in the USA?

Here in Canada we get Continental "CrossContact LX Sport". I'm wondering if they are the same across the board, or if they use different tires from the factory depending on region of delivery.

I'm not usually a big fan of OEM factory installed tires, but honestly, I'm shocked at how good these are on ice and in snow. We've had a few winter storms here already, and quite a few glare-ice mornings, and these Conti's have been awesome. In fact, better than the Goodyear Nordic winter tires that I had on my previous Sienna. Granted those were 10 years old (but still with tons of tread left).

...Although if you look at the reviews on TireRack of these Conti's it would appear that my opinion is not shared by many. Maybe my expectations are just low? But IMO I think these are pretty good so far.
Comparing 10 year old snow tires to fresh rubber isn't exactly a fair fight. I don't care how well they were stored, the rubber still degrades and ages and the compound is just not as effective, especially 10 years down the road. Also, as with all tires I'm assuming the snow tires have advanced tremendously in the last 10 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Comparing 10 year old snow tires to fresh rubber isn't exactly a fair fight. I don't care how well they were stored, the rubber still degrades and ages and the compound is just not as effective, especially 10 years down the road. Also, as with all tires I'm assuming the snow tires have advanced tremendously in the last 10 years.
Yep, totally agree... That's why I said "Granted those were 10 years old", and also "Maybe my expectations are just low"...

But I really hate swapping and storing winter/summer wheels. With 3 vehicles in the family and soon to be a 4th, it's a big space commitment for storage. When time comes to replace the Contis, I'm likely going with one of the newer 3PMSF-branded Grand Touring All-Season's.

These Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady's and Michelin CrossClimate+'s both look really good, and both the current ratings and actual testing on TireRack shows them to be not too far behind actual dedicated winter tires for performance on ice, which is one of our biggest challenges here in Canada:



These are the two top-of-the-list all-seasons for winter performance:


Finally, here's the TireRack actual test info on these, which shows how well they perform compared to a dedicated winter tire. They are surprisingly close:


The Goodyears cost the same as the Conti's, but with way better ratings and also much better year-round treadwear performance, so no reason not to go that route for replacements. The Michelins are not (yet?) available in the 20" sizes.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
Yep, totally agree... That's why I said "Granted those were 10 years old", and also "Maybe my expectations are just low"...

But I really hate swapping and storing winter/summer wheels. With 3 vehicles in the family and soon to be a 4th, it's a big space commitment for storage. When time comes to replace the Contis, I'm likely going with one of the newer 3PMSF-branded Grand Touring All-Season's.

These Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady's and Michelin CrossClimate+'s both look really good, and both the current ratings and actual testing on TireRack shows them to be not too far behind actual dedicated winter tires for performance on ice, which is one of our biggest challenges here in Canada:



These are the two top-of-the-list all-seasons for winter performance:


Finally, here's the TireRack actual test info on these, which shows how well they perform compared to a dedicated winter tire. They are surprisingly close:


The Goodyears cost the same as the Conti's, but with way better ratings and also much better year-round treadwear performance, so no reason not to go that route for replacements. The Michelins are not (yet?) available in the 20" sizes.

Cheers!
I can understand the hassle, even more so with 4 vehicles to deal with... luckily in MD we don't need snow tires but I have done the performance summer tire thing for a number of years. It's nice the "all weather" tires are becoming much better at bridging the gap between dedicated winter tires and all seasons, I just wonder if they perform as well as winter tires as they wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
I see the OP asked if the "stock tires" are any good in snow.

I scanned the thread, but didn't actually see the brand/model of the "stock tires" mentioned.

Which makes me curious... what "stock tires" do you guys get down in the USA?

Here in Canada we get Continental "CrossContact LX Sport". I'm wondering if they are the same across the board, or if they use different tires from the factory depending on region of delivery.

I'm not usually a big fan of OEM factory installed tires, but honestly, I'm shocked at how good these are on ice and in snow. We've had a few winter storms here already, and quite a few glare-ice mornings, and these Conti's have been awesome. In fact, better than the Goodyear Nordic winter tires that I had on my previous Sienna. Granted those were 10 years old (but still with tons of tread left).

...Although if you look at the reviews on TireRack of these Conti's it would appear that my opinion is not shared by many. Maybe my expectations are just low? But IMO I think these are pretty good so far.
In the US, the 2020 20" tire is also the CrossContact LX Sport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
In the US, the 2020 20" tire is also the CrossContact LX Sport.
All the '17, '18, '19 that I saw had the CrossContact LX Sport for the 20". All the 18" I saw had the Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS.

The Goodyears are probably better than the Conti's but still a compromise. Some things to keep in mind. Most of the winter tires have a "snow wear bar" at 6/32" to let you know that grip will be reduced and not recommended for winter, still good for dry and wet, legal limit is 2/32". So if you drive on the Goodyears year round they might be close to that wear limit pending how you drive next season. Hopefully you get 2-3 years before that.

From the Caltrans website also:
Are “all-weather” or “all-terrain” tires the same as “snow” tires?
They may be. Snow tires have the designation “Mud & Snow” or an abbreviation such as “M-S,” “M+S,” or “M/S” marked on the tire sidewall. Tires without this designation are not considered snow tires. Snow tires must also have at least 6/32-inch (3/16”) of tread depth (about 1/2 of the original tread depth).

So that being said you might want to consider if they are good for you in the snow, you might want to swap them in spring back to the Conti's and save them. If you are going to swap them anyway, get the better actual snows. How aggressive is your choice based on ratings. I haven't tried them but they get great reviews many places and are referred to as being better than many all seasons in handling and ride that are also excellent in snow and ice, just not in deeper snow. Michelin Latitude X-Ice Xi2. They are the only winter tire I know that has a treadwear warranty. My Brother-in-law has them for his Tiguan and is very happy.

The choice for rim size and what you buy now might keep you locked in some to minimize cost, you could always get spare 20's. If I had seen some 17" inch rims that I liked I probably would have gotten that size (like the Acura rims in classifieds). I went with my factory size since she almost wrecked it in first couple days and more snow was forecast.

The 20" will do fine in snow with correct tire. The reason for down sizing is normally cheaper cost for tire and less expensive rims. It also provides more flex when you hit potholes, ice chunks etc. so you don't damage your nicer rims. Smaller rims with more sidewall work better if you ever plan to air down for beach or offroad. It lets the tire flex and spread out more. At normal pressure it has same contact patch.

For All-Weather tires I had Nokian WRG2 that I used as my snows for a couple years. They worked very well in snow and ice, not quite as good the Nokian snows I had on previous car but good UNTIL they got to about 4-5/32" and it snowed a nice dry snow. I was at the point that I almost turned around and didn't go to work. I stayed in the lane behind others with a lot of extra room in front because driving on the actual snow was scary. The rubber had gotten harder, sipes not as good, I experienced the white knuckle, hold tight to wheel, nervous that many people describe as their experience. Hated that, definitely not something I was used to!

Many of my family still run the WRG3 and WRG4 now year round BUT they also will get new at about 6/32" IF it is coming to winter time.

In regards to the Conti's. Many years back I bought the Continental CrossContact LX (not sport) in H-rated for the Sequoia, they were getting good reviews. That winter my snows were old and needed to be replaced, holidays and money I figured my 3 month old Conti's might be OK so I left them on. First snow wife went out to go shopping she was back 5 minutes later saying something was wrong with the 4WD and the truck was sliding everywhere. She parked it and took my Sonata (on Nokians). I went out to test everything, 4WD was working perfectly, all traction "aids" working perfectly, truck would barely get going, then wouldn't stop or turn. I wasn't expecting snow tire performance but these were like summer tires from the videos. Some people have bad experience and say "I'll never buy Conti, Michelin, Firestone, Ford, Chevy etc". I probably won't put any CrossContact version back on something BUT my Pilot and Sonata are riding on Continental WinterContact SI, my son's Forte is on Continental VikingContact 7 and CRV is on General Altimax Arctic 12 (owned by Continental). I'd like to try the newer Nokian R3's but at twice the price and almost same ratings from all the European tests a bit hard to justify.

On the storing space- yup, in my shed right now is 16 tires, 12 on rims. Need a bigger shed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
On the tranny modes with the snow mode iirc it uses the brakes to limit wheel spin and you are only giving 1/2 the throttle you think you are based on the mapping. The Sand and I think Mud use the differential locking up so it can spin all tires if you want to give it gas to get unstuck. It does disable stabilty controls so normal or snow recommended once moving to keep all safety systems working.

One of my experiences with the brake based was on the Sequoia on a small hill by my house. Night time snowing with 2 season old Altimax Arctics. In 2WD, stop on hill and try to go. lots of clicking, buzzing, beeping, no forward motion, almost no throttle allowed as it tried all traction control methods. Actually ended up sliding backwards and sideways, had to use 4WD to get up the hill. 5 minutes later, come back to same hill in my Dad's Chevy Express conversion van with just rear wheel drive and regular limited slip differential no other traction controls also on 2 season old Altimax Arctic. Stop at same spot a couple feet over. Step on gas, motor revs, rear end kicks out some and drives right up hill with rear wheel spinning some but clearing a nice path. FWD drive Sonata same hill with Nokians, some spin at start but drove right up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Snow video with 2016 Pilot with 20" Michelin X-ice tires. Your snow and ice conditions might be different. It was either in video or in comments that he did use sand mode for the hill so it didn't kill throttle like snow mode does.

Pilot test

I thought he did one of his "diagonal test" also but can't find it. He does have Ridgeline and Passport with different modes which we know is also the same system.
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top