Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at purchasing a 2019 Pilot EX-L and felt really good about it until i looked under the hood and saw this new Earth Dreams engine. I know they have some problems with fuel/oil mixing in colder climates but i am concerned about the longevity of the engine. i have a 2006 Honda Accord that has 221,000 miles on it and never had any major repairs, besides the 95 Volvo 850 i owned it has been one of the best vehicles i have ever had. i would like to feel confident that if i buy this 2019 Pilot it will be just as reliable and get 250,000 miles or more. Any thoughts or knowledge about these new engines?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
I think that was in the Civic and CR-V with the I4 turbo motor? And has since been remedied.

I don't see any reason why the drivetrain wouldn't last 200,000 miles, provided you do regular maintenance. Every year I trust the technology less and less to last, my concerns are mostly with infotainment screens and the gauge cluster screens.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tourist2012

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. I know nothing about all of this new technology, I suppose i have to jump in somewhere! Hopefully these new engines will have the same reliability as the old V-TEC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Fuel/Oil mixing is a known problem in the smaller 4 cylinder turbo engines, found on the CR-V. As I understand it is due to the higher compression and pressures that the turbo creates in the combustion chamber, forcing the fuel past the rings and down into the oil pan. It has not been reported as a problem on any mfgr's V6's that I'm aware of.

The concern with the newer Earthdreams V6, and it is NOT unique to Honda, (it's a potential problem with ALL direct injection engines) is that the lack of port injection (IE, where the fuel is injected into the intake manifold) prevents the additives and detergents in the fuel from flowing over the intake valves, potentially leading to carbon buildup on the valves and top of the cylinder head. In a direct injection engine (like those used by most manufacturers now) the fuel is injected directly into the top of the cylinder, bypassing the valves.

This has reportedly been a very big problem for VW, again as I understand it, based on their design. I have read that Honda has done certain things (I can't remember exactly what now) to reduce the likelihood of this problem, but there is still speculation about how effective Honda's design is since it is quite new.

Here is some objective info, and you can do a ton of additional reading and research on your own if you want:


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
To add to BMPeter... I have not heard of any issues related to DI with the Pilot outside of some faulty injectors. Some manufacturers (looking at the Germans mostly, the GM Ecotec 2.5 had a lot of issues as well) seem to have issues with carbon buildup. If you were getting an Atlas I'd tell you to do the research since VW had issues prior, but you should be fine with the Pilot.

I think it boils down to the early adopters of this tech having widespread issues for a while and the early engine line for each manufacturer that adopted DI having issues. It seems to be less of an issue globally with each year that passes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I think that was in the Civic and CR-V with the I4 turbo motor? And has since been remedied.

I don't see any reason why the drivetrain wouldn't last 200,000 miles, provided you do regular maintenance. Every year I trust the technology less and less to last, my concerns are mostly with infotainment screens and the gauge cluster screens.
Truthfully, 200k seems very low to me. I would expect with proper maintenance and probably a major repair to the valve train one time along the way, 400k would be pretty realistic. Am I smoking the ganj to think that?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
379 Posts
Had a 2017 EX-L and now a 2019 EX-L. Got the 2017 to just over 40k miles before trading in. Not one issue at all. Just under 4k on 2019, so far so good. I have faith in it. Honda makes great engines, some say the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
Truthfully, 200k seems very low to me. I would expect with proper maintenance and probably a major repair to the valve train one time along the way, 400k would be pretty realistic. Am I smoking the ganj to think that?
I don't think it's impossible as these engines run so much tighter and with proper maintenance don't wear out like older engines could... but there are a lot of plastic parts and dissimilar metals in engines now and I am not very trusting of 400k lifespans with how delicate some of these parts seem to be... I'm gonna stick to my 200k remark, if it gets to that I'm thrilled and feel I've gotten my money out of the vehicle. Anything beyond that is icing but at that point I'd probably pull back on expensive repairs and would move on if something costly arises.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Truthfully, 200k seems very low to me. I would expect with proper maintenance and probably a major repair to the valve train one time along the way, 400k would be pretty realistic. Am I smoking the ganj to think that?
Yes, i would expect to get well over 200K miles from a Honda or Toyota engine. At least that's how it used to be and hopefully still is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I don't think it's impossible as these engines run so much tighter and with proper maintenance don't wear out like older engines could... but there are a lot of plastic parts and dissimilar metals in engines now and I am not very trusting of 400k lifespans with how delicate some of these parts seem to be... I'm gonna stick to my 200k remark, if it gets to that I'm thrilled and feel I've gotten my money out of the vehicle. Anything beyond that is icing but at that point I'd probably pull back on expensive repairs and would move on if something costly arises.
Yeah, if you look at it from a resale value or cost benefit calculation - you either plan to run them into the ground and save money for a couple years while you don't have payments, or you trade in early and often and absorb the cost of the trade-in/new purchase cycle. I personally have a problem with the way dealerships are looking to make $5k off a trade-in plus another $5k or more (with "mandatory" add ons like the antitheft engraving, spinning rims and extended warranties, etc) but I also love new just like everyone else.... So it depends on how I'm feeling about things - I will admit, I get bored with vehicles quickly lol... But in terms of plastic parts and such - meh - just buy new parts every now and then - budget $2k each year ($165/mo) when you're out of loan and you can pretty much keep anything on the road for a long time. That said - I'm loving the new-to-me Pilot and am already looking forward to getting it paid down enough to trade in for a new one in a few years lol....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
Yeah, if you look at it from a resale value or cost benefit calculation - you either plan to run them into the ground and save money for a couple years while you don't have payments, or you trade in early and often and absorb the cost of the trade-in/new purchase cycle. I personally have a problem with the way dealerships are looking to make $5k off a trade-in plus another $5k or more (with "mandatory" add ons like the antitheft engraving, spinning rims and extended warranties, etc) but I also love new just like everyone else.... So it depends on how I'm feeling about things - I will admit, I get bored with vehicles quickly lol... But in terms of plastic parts and such - meh - just buy new parts every now and then - budget $2k each year ($165/mo) when you're out of loan and you can pretty much keep anything on the road for a long time. That said - I'm loving the new-to-me Pilot and am already looking forward to getting it paid down enough to trade in for a new one in a few years lol....
All fair points! Our Pilot and Sonata are both paid off, the Traverse has a pretty low monthly payment but it still kills me every month! The Pilot's value is high enough that it's worth doing pretty much anything to at this point. The Sonata was offered less than $1k on trade, maybe I could get $2k privately. I've set the limit at the value of the car, if I exceed that with a repair it's done and gone...

I am with you, if you look at my past vehicles in my signature, there was a point where I was exceeding one car per year of driving. Now that I've had kids and a house (and a wife who does not understand such things) I have toned it down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
All fair points! Our Pilot and Sonata are both paid off, the Traverse has a pretty low monthly payment but it still kills me every month! The Pilot's value is high enough that it's worth doing pretty much anything to at this point. The Sonata was offered less than $1k on trade, maybe I could get $2k privately. I've set the limit at the value of the car, if I exceed that with a repair it's done and gone...

I am with you, if you look at my past vehicles in my signature, there was a point where I was exceeding one car per year of driving. Now that I've had kids and a house (and a wife who does not understand such things) I have toned it down.
hahaha! love it! I'm kinda in the same boat suddenly - hence the need for the Pilot instead of my awesome CRV I traded in for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I am looking at purchasing a 2019 Pilot EX-L and felt really good about it until i looked under the hood and saw this new Earth Dreams engine. I know they have some problems with fuel/oil mixing in colder climates but i am concerned about the longevity of the engine. i have a 2006 Honda Accord that has 221,000 miles on it and never had any major repairs, besides the 95 Volvo 850 i owned it has been one of the best vehicles i have ever had. i would like to feel confident that if i buy this 2019 Pilot it will be just as reliable and get 250,000 miles or more. Any thoughts or knowledge about these new engines?
I have a 2016 Pilot EXL. At 42,000 miles needed new fuel injectors. I had extended warranty so no charge. Bill would have been $1500!! It was carbon build up. Service desk suggested every fourth tank run 93 octane to burn off carbon. Another Piloteer suggests injector cleaner every fourth tank.
I do get great highway mileage though with the three cylinder cutoff while cruising. 27.5 mpg. This might be the source of carbon buildup.
 

·
Registered
2010 Pilot EXL
Joined
·
52 Posts
All gas direct injection engines have issues with gas bleeding into the oil in cold climates and drivers who make short trips and fail to get engine oil up to full temperature.

This issue was compounded by motir oil formulations that were not up to this engine design. A new family of motor oils is just being released to deal with this specific engine design.

Oil manufacturers have release oils dubbed API SN+ as an interim step until the industry finslizes a new spec, perhaps API "SO" at some point. European manufacturers have the ILSAC GF-6 spec in place for GDI engines.
Here is a castrol article on the subject.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
I am looking at purchasing a 2019 Pilot EX-L and felt really good about it until i looked under the hood and saw this new Earth Dreams engine. I know they have some problems with fuel/oil mixing in colder climates but i am concerned about the longevity of the engine. i have a 2006 Honda Accord that has 221,000 miles on it and never had any major repairs, besides the 95 Volvo 850 i owned it has been one of the best vehicles i have ever had. i would like to feel confident that if i buy this 2019 Pilot it will be just as reliable and get 250,000 miles or more. Any thoughts or knowledge about these new engines?
I also had a 95 Volvo 850, an 850 Turbo I bought new and which we donated to a charity last year after my wife bought her 2018 Honda CR-V in December 2018. She inherited the Volvo from me when I bought my 2012 Honda Pilot new. IMHO, the 850 was that last good, distinctive looking Volvo. It served us swell for many years. We could not trade it in as the odometer had broken around 2016 and the dealer would not take it because of that. The dashboard would have to have been removed to take the odometer out to be fixed and I couldn't see spending that much money on labor. The '95 Volvo was not nearly as easy and simple to work on as our former 1974 164E and 1984 240. Volvos are too expensive nowadays and I don't like the styles. My wife and I are both very happy with our Hondas.

If you buy the Pilot I hope you will be as happy with it as I have been with mine. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
All gas direct injection engines have issues with gas bleeding into the oil in cold climates and drivers who make short trips and fail to get engine oil up to full temperature.

This issue was compounded by motir oil formulations that were not up to this engine design. A new family of motor oils is just being released to deal with this specific engine design.

Oil manufacturers have release oils dubbed API SN+ as an interim step until the industry finslizes a new spec, perhaps API "SO" at some point. European manufacturers have the ILSAC GF-6 spec in place for GDI engines.
Here is a castrol article on the subject.

Copied from the Pennzoil site
API SN PLUS is a new motor oil specification developed for turbocharged engines that is being developed in response to automakers request for motor oils that protect against Low-Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI). LSPI is an engine condition known to occur in Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection (TGDI) engines that can be mitigated by changing the motor oil formulation.

GF-6 Information

SN+ has been out for a while now. The US will be getting the GF-6 specs May 1, 2020.. There are some oils which meet that spec already, but legally they can not advertise that fact yet until it is officially released. AP SN+ is actually for LSPI (low speed pre-ignition) which is a concern on some turbo charged direct injection engines. The Honda Pilot engine is not turbocharged. The best specs to follow now include the Dexos1 Gen 2 or using an oil such as Mobil 1 EP which contains a large quantity of PAO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
Not to hijack this thread, but where did you get the idea that the I4 turbo gas in oil problem had be remedied?

(former CR-V owner)
Not sure if you are asking "had to be" or "had been"... there is a recall, you can look it up if you were asking "had to be". If you are asking "had been", I guess I am just assuming it was sufficiently fixed by the recall. I'm not a CR-V owner and don't know anyone with a current gen to ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I have a 2016 Pilot EXL. At 42,000 miles needed new fuel injectors. I had extended warranty so no charge. Bill would have been $1500!! It was carbon build up. Service desk suggested every fourth tank run 93 octane to burn off carbon. Another Piloteer suggests injector cleaner every fourth tank.
I do get great highway mileage though with the three cylinder cutoff while cruising. 27.5 mpg. This might be the source of carbon buildup.
What type of fuel do you use? Is it TOP TIER gas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I have a 2016 Pilot EXL. At 42,000 miles needed new fuel injectors. I had extended warranty so no charge. Bill would have been $1500!! It was carbon build up. Service desk suggested every fourth tank run 93 octane to burn off carbon. Another Piloteer suggests injector cleaner every fourth tank.
I do get great highway mileage though with the three cylinder cutoff while cruising. 27.5 mpg. This might be the source of carbon buildup.
Consumer Reports did a study of gasoline with detergents vs generic gasoline. The detergent gas when used regularly would keep the valves clean and would even clean valves on cars that had buildup.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top