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There is a back story to this but essentially we were hit by a giant metal spool (7ft.) of what looks like the stuff cable companies use to wrap cable before they bury it. Everyone is fine but as we are waiting to get in for our estimate I thought I'd ask here. How much would y'all estimate this will cost to fix? Will insurance just total it?
139126
139127

And the thing that hit us.
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Def not totaled. Value on that Pilot still in the mid 30s minimum. Insurance would def cover it.. theirs of course.
 

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It’s unlikely that the insurance will total it. I’ve incurred a $15k initial damage accident on a ‘17 Elite, in 2017... (which was closer to $19k when done) and they did not want to total. Maybe you’ll have better luck.

When you negotiate this with a body shop, tell them a couple of things up front.

1. Ask them if the finished job will have noticeable paint lines (a dead giveaway of a partially repainted car). It is where old and new paint meet, and you can feel it usually with your finger tips. They can paint more of the car so the paint lines are hidden under plastic moldings inside the car.

2. Ask them about orange peel and holograms in the finished paint.

3. Ask about how your interior will be protected while in their shop. They have corrosive dust in most body shops, my vehicle came back with this hard to describe but definitely noticeable wear on surfaces, especially the navigation screen with the oleophobic coating.

You can always total it yourself, but it may be costly.


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You're car definitely won't be totaled, but yes I think the paint will be an issue. This is one of those areas where they can't just paint the whole panel so they'll have to blend it in really good which may or may not happen depending on how good your body shop is. Also a tiny bit of advice: pretend you're a YouTuber (if you can) so they can think you'll post the results and maybe they'll do a better job. :)
 

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Not likely to be totaled. Repair might include new door skin and rear quarter panel. Probably will show up on Carfax and it won’t buff out. Good to hear everyone is safe.
 

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It’s unlikely that the insurance will total it. I’ve incurred a $15k initial damage accident on a ‘17 Elite, in 2017... (which was closer to $19k when done) and they did not want to total. Maybe you’ll have better luck.

When you negotiate this with a body shop, tell them a couple of things up front.

1. Ask them if the finished job will have noticeable paint lines (a dead giveaway of a partially repainted car). It is where old and new paint meet, and you can feel it usually with your finger tips. They can paint more of the car so the paint lines are hidden under plastic moldings inside the car.

2. Ask them about orange peel and holograms in the finished paint.

3. Ask about how your interior will be protected while in their shop. They have corrosive dust in most body shops, my vehicle came back with this hard to describe but definitely noticeable wear on surfaces, especially the navigation screen with the oleophobic coating.

You can always total it yourself, but it may be costly.


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I work in a body shop (I’m a painter) none of what you said is accurate (not trying to be rude.) any panel getting painted, gets full clearcoat, with color, if it’s a new panel it gets sealer. If it’s just a small repair, it gets primed, blocked, smoothed out, color over top, color blend around the repair to make it invisible to the eye, and full clearcoat. And the panels are completely torn down. Glass, Moldings, door handles, belt moldings, weatherstrip are all removed to where you mask and stop painting is underneath what is visible. So the only texture difference you can really see is fresh clearcoat next to a factory finish. Which if you are really picky, the shop can buff and polish the adjacent panels to renew the clearcoat and make it look brand new.
Holograms in the paint I think you’re referring to sand scratches resulting from poor buffing, which is easy to prevent/fix and is standard procedure for any shop.
And no, you can’t total a car yourself unless it’s at like 90% threshold and the insurance company gives you the option. Quarter panel replacement, new door shell, blend front door. Done and done! Pretty standard repair for any reputable shop.
 

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I work in a body shop (I’m a painter) none of what you said is accurate (not trying to be rude.) any panel getting painted, gets full clearcoat, with color, if it’s a new panel it gets sealer. If it’s just a small repair, it gets primed, blocked, smoothed out, color over top, color blend around the repair to make it invisible to the eye, and full clearcoat. And the panels are completely torn down. Glass, Moldings, door handles, belt moldings, weatherstrip are all removed to where you mask and stop painting is underneath what is visible. So the only texture difference you can really see is fresh clearcoat next to a factory finish. Which if you are really picky, the shop can buff and polish the adjacent panels to renew the clearcoat and make it look brand new.
Holograms in the paint I think you’re referring to sand scratches resulting from poor buffing, which is easy to prevent/fix and is standard procedure for any shop.
And no, you can’t total a car yourself unless it’s at like 90% threshold and the insurance company gives you the option. Quarter panel replacement, new door shell, blend front door. Done and done! Pretty standard repair for any reputable shop.
Hey I have a question since you work in a body shop. If someone does get damage on a place like the op did, how does it get fixed? This panel goes all the way to the front of the car, and it also seems connected to the inside of the door jambs. I’ve been having this question in my head for a long time lol.
 

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I work in a body shop (I’m a painter) none of what you said is accurate (not trying to be rude.) any panel getting painted, gets full clearcoat, with color, if it’s a new panel it gets sealer. If it’s just a small repair, it gets primed, blocked, smoothed out, color over top, color blend around the repair to make it invisible to the eye, and full clearcoat. And the panels are completely torn down. Glass, Moldings, door handles, belt moldings, weatherstrip are all removed to where you mask and stop painting is underneath what is visible. So the only texture difference you can really see is fresh clearcoat next to a factory finish. Which if you are really picky, the shop can buff and polish the adjacent panels to renew the clearcoat and make it look brand new.
Holograms in the paint I think you’re referring to sand scratches resulting from poor buffing, which is easy to prevent/fix and is standard procedure for any shop.
And no, you can’t total a car yourself unless it’s at like 90% threshold and the insurance company gives you the option. Quarter panel replacement, new door shell, blend front door. Done and done! Pretty standard repair for any reputable shop.
Hey I have a question since you work in a body shop. If someone does get damage on a place like the op did, how does it get fixed? This panel goes all the way to the front of the car, and it also seems connected to the inside of the door jambs. I’ve been having this question in my head for a long time lol.
talking about the Quarter panel, it is sectioned. Along the top half of the quarter glass. The old quarter is cut out, spot welds removed down below behind the bumper, in the door jamb area, and along the rear body panel. It’s also sectioned in the dog leg of the rear door jamb into the rocker area. The new quarter is bought as a complete panel, it’s cut and trimmed to fit into the exact same spot as the old fit, backing plates are made, welded in and spot welds are redone. Then it’s body filler, seam sealer, primer, block, sealer, color, clear! I’ll try and get a photo tomorrow of a car we just did a quarter replace on. We painted a Ford Fusion today that got a new quarter. I’ll show what the finished product Looks like after paint and before it is put back together.
 

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I don’t mean to be rude either but I don’t think you are correct, or maybe we have a different view of what restoring the car to preaccident condition means.

Having paint lines in areas which are not visible but you can touch, are still paint lines. Sure it might be on the inside edge of the door and not visible but you can easily feel. People who buy used cars will run their fingers along the panel edges to check exactly for that. The body shop I worked with painted all the way into the inside of the car, so the paint lines could only be sensed if you removed plastic interior parts.

I agree on the holograms being a rushed buffing issue. The problem is that when you mention that to most body shops they just throw some heavy filler on it which will come off in a few washes, instead of doing paint correction. Although new cars never come with such swirls somehow certain body shops will blame the customer for being too demanding instead of admitting the issue and correcting it.

Maybe you work for one of the few body shops that still care about quality work instead of turning over quantity as a DRP shop, where the insurance company calls all the shots. I know cars can be fixed as good as new, but many shops just do sloppy “good enough, not worth their time to bring it back” jobs.


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I don’t mean to be rude either but I don’t think you are correct, or maybe we have a different view of what restoring the car to preaccident condition means.

Having paint lines in areas which are not visible but you can touch, are still paint lines. Sure it might be on the inside edge of the door and not visible but you can easily feel. People who buy used cars will run their fingers along the panel edges to check exactly for that. The body shop I worked with painted all the way into the inside of the car, so the paint lines could only be sensed if you removed plastic interior parts.

I agree on the holograms being a rushed buffing issue. The problem is that when you mention that to most body shops they just throw some heavy filler on it which will come off in a few washes, instead of doing paint correction. Although new cars never come with such swirls somehow certain body shops will blame the customer for being too demanding instead of admitting the issue and correcting it.

Maybe you work for one of the few body shops that still care about quality work instead of turning over quantity as a DRP shop, where the insurance company calls all the shots. I know cars can be fixed as good as new, but many shops just do sloppy “good enough, not worth their time to bring it back” jobs.


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well ok, a basic understanding of how to mask a car goes a long way with hiding mask lines. A simple roll mask in a door jamb eliminates any paint lines, and if a mask line is underneath a plastic panel, behind and below what the molding covers, then there is 100% no way you will ever see a paint line when the door is assembled. The only way you would see it is if you pull the panels off And let’s be realistic, if you have no indication that a quarter panel is painted, would you pay a glass guy to remove your quarter glass, just to see if there is a paint line underneath your glass? I’d say no. And if you did, tally ho your quarter panel is painted and the only way you found out is by paying $100 for a glass guy to R&I your glass.
Also having a paint line “not visible but you can touch” Doesn’t make sense. If there is a paint line that you can’t see, then it’s not a paint line. If you can feel it, you can see it.

“heavy filler that will come off in a few washes“? filler is a body filler (Like bondo). That goes over metal, under the primer, Under color, under clear. It doesn’t wash off LOL If it washes off, then so would the entire repair.
Where did you learn all of the info you are sharing? I learned mine from I-CAR, PPG, and 12 years in the auto repair industry.
 

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I work in a body shop (I’m a painter) none of what you said is accurate (not trying to be rude.) any panel getting painted, gets full clearcoat, with color, if it’s a new panel it gets sealer. If it’s just a small repair, it gets primed, blocked, smoothed out, color over top, color blend around the repair to make it invisible to the eye, and full clearcoat. And the panels are completely torn down. Glass, Moldings, door handles, belt moldings, weatherstrip are all removed to where you mask and stop painting is underneath what is visible. So the only texture difference you can really see is fresh clearcoat next to a factory finish. Which if you are really picky, the shop can buff and polish the adjacent panels to renew the clearcoat and make it look brand new.
Holograms in the paint I think you’re referring to sand scratches resulting from poor buffing, which is easy to prevent/fix and is standard procedure for any shop.
And no, you can’t total a car yourself unless it’s at like 90% threshold and the insurance company gives you the option. Quarter panel replacement, new door shell, blend front door. Done and done! Pretty standard repair for any reputable shop.
And with regard to totaling the car yourself you absolutely can. You could do it if the windshield broke (a really extreme example and obviously not practical). Take the money the insurance gives you for repairs, sell the vehicle without fixing it, and go buy a new one. It gets costly because you end up having to pay depreciation as well, but some insurance companies won’t pay for a brand new vehicle either, unless you have gap insurance.

If you file a Diminished Value Claim, and the responsible insurance company goes along, it can be practical occasionally to total the vehicle yourself.


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And with regard to totaling the car yourself you absolutely can. You could do it if the windshield broke (a really extreme example and obviously not practical). Take the money the insurance gives you for repairs, sell the vehicle without fixing it, and go buy a new one. It gets costly because you end up having to pay depreciation as well, but some insurance companies won’t pay for a brand new vehicle either, unless you have gap insurance.

If you file a Diminished Value Claim, and the responsible insurance company goes along, it can be practical occasionally to total the vehicle yourself.


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That is not totaling a vehicle.... You are referring to an allowance. A cash out. If repairs cost $1000, you can refuse to fix and take a majority of the repair cost (like 80% of the estimate). Take the cash and walk away. That doesn’t total a vehicle lol that just means you’re vehicle has damage and you have money in your pocket. That has nothing to do with totaling it.
 

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Heavy filler as in a buffing compound... as in the stuff suspended in it. The stuff that makes the paint job phenomenal by hiding things.

And sure you can always see paint lines you can touch, but picture it along the edge of the doors, or inside edge of the fender. I am not making this up, it happened to my car, and it wa the body shop which said “but you can’t see it”.

If you do a job that would largely be indistinguishable from a new car, hats off to you, and I will gladly bring my vehicle to your shop. That just hasn’t been my experience.


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Heavy filler as in a buffing compound... as in the stuff suspended in it. The stuff that makes the paint job phenomenal by hiding things.

And sure you can always see paint lines you can touch, but picture it along the edge of the doors, or inside edge of the fender. I am not making this up, it happened to my car, and it wa the body shop which said “but you can’t see it”.

If you do a job that would largely be indistinguishable from a new car, hats off to you, and I will gladly bring my vehicle to your shop. That just hasn’t been my experience.


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Heavy cutting compound. It Is a gritty paste that is used during the cutting phase. Which is phase one out of three. Very easy to fix. Whatever shop that told you it was fine sounds pretty hacky. That’s not the standard in our shop! Lol I’ll show a few pictures of an RV that I painted.
 

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talking about the Quarter panel, it is sectioned. Along the top half of the quarter glass. The old quarter is cut out, spot welds removed down below behind the bumper, in the door jamb area, and along the rear body panel. It’s also sectioned in the dog leg of the rear door jamb into the rocker area. The new quarter is bought as a complete panel, it’s cut and trimmed to fit into the exact same spot as the old fit, backing plates are made, welded in and spot welds are redone. Then it’s body filler, seam sealer, primer, block, sealer, color, clear! I’ll try and get a photo tomorrow of a car we just did a quarter replace on. We painted a Ford Fusion today that got a new quarter. I’ll show what the finished product Looks like after paint and before it is put back together.
Oh gosh I didn’t know it was this much work. Please send a pic!
 

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We sectioned the nose piece on this rv. The light gray spots you see at the bottom of the windshield is where it was sectioned. I primed and blocked it, and that is where I started my color blend to melt into the factory paint. This should all be standard procedure at all shops. Pay attention to a shops I-CAR rating. If they don’t have one, find a different shop.
 

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They did not actually tell me. Every time I took it in because there were crazy swirls all over the panel, they’d take my car in and return it within 10 minutes. It would look awesome until I washed it a few times. They did this twice until I called them on it.

Body work and painting especially is somewhat of an artwork. I have so much respect for the profession. But insurance company practices as well as some body shops which emphasize quantity (for somewhat understandable business reasons) oftentimes are not quality oriented at all. It can be very frustrating to customers.


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They did not actually tell me. Every time I took it in because there were crazy swirls all over the panel, they’d take my car in and return it within 10 minutes. It would look awesome until I washed it a few times. They did this twice until I called them on it.

Body work and painting especially is somewhat of an artwork. I have so much respect for the profession. But insurance company practices as well as some body shops which emphasize quantity (for somewhat understandable business reasons) oftentimes are not quality oriented at all. It can be very frustrating to customers.


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Bring it to me I’ll fix it!! That sucks you had a bad experience. But I promise we aren’t all like that!
 
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