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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Traded a 2014 Odyssey Touring for a 2017 Pilot EX-L after the Odyssey's defective rear head cracked and the motor oil and coolant mixed together and throughout everything. Nightmare situation which I won't go into more here. Was running a set of winter wheels and Blizzaks on the Odyssey, which stored two sets of TPMS codes and allowed swapping back Spring/Winter wheels/tires each year without any issues. Had hoped to use the Odyssey winter wheels/tires on the Pilot even though they were smaller. Bolted them on to the Pilot and they fit well. The Odyssey's tire size is 235/65R17, while the Pilot's are 245/60R18. This equates to .6" smaller. The TPMS system refuses to recognize the winter tires. Dash message states "TPMS Problem," and none of the tires register.

From reading on this forum, I see the Pilot's indirect system is supposed to recognize Honda TPMS sensors in replacement wheels without having to do any retraining or resetting. As described above, it is not doing that. Stopped by the Discount Tire where I'd purchased the Odyssey wheels/tires for help. Service tech said the Honda indirect system monitors tire pressure through wheel speed sensors and the rotational speed of the tire. He claims that the smaller diameter of the tire (a little over a 1/2 inch) is preventing the Pilot's system from automatically learning the new tires, and that there is nothing I can do to make it work. Said there was no programming he could do to the tpms sensors in the wheels that would change this.

Any thoughts or advice on things I might try to get it to yet work? (I disconnected the battery hoping it would reset but that did not do anything.) Any advice whatsoever would be welcomed (short of telling me to buy factory sized winter wheels/tires).

If she is simply not going to work, is there any negative impact of running the car with the TPMS light constantly on? It will only be for about 4 months. I understood on the Odyssey that running with the tpms light on would disengage the traction control system. As the Pilot is AWD, I would not think this would be of concern. But, does anyone know of any other systems that may not work properly if the tpms system is in warning mode?

Thanks in advance,

Mark
Minneapolis, MN
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Am going to try to answer my own post, at least partially. Did more reading tonight on indirect systems. If my research is good, then it looks like there are no tpms sensors in the wheels on an indirect system, like on a direct system. The indirect system uses the ABS sensors to determine wheel speed, and as long as all the wheels are rotating at the same speed, the tpms is not triggered. If one wheel is low on air, however, its diameter is smaller, which causes the wheel to be rotating faster, which at some point hits a percentage of difference that triggers the tpms warning system.

Assuming I am correct in the above description, then the tpms sensors that are in my Odyssey winter wheels are irrelevant. And I'm questioning whether the Discount Tire tech knew what he was talking about when he claimed that the 1/2" smaller sized wheels would prevent the Pilot's system from working. I cannot find anything online that indicates a particular range of tire has to be used in order for the system to work. Instead, again, as long as all of the tires are the same diameter (which my winter tires are), they should be recognized as the ABS wheel sensors "relearn" my winter tire setup.

Someone on another forum posted that an indirect system needs at least twenty continuous minutes of 30 to 60 mph to relearn or calibrate for new tires. Someone else posted that an indirect system may need to be re-initialized when new tires are put on, or at least have the old diameters/wheel speeds in memory erased so the new ones can be learned. Neither of these other forums were talking specifically about the third generation Pilots. Based on what I've read on this forum, I'm led to believe the system should calibrate itself with use. Am going to take her for a longer drive tomorrow, although I think we've hit that 20 at 30to60 mark already a couple of times with no success. I don't know why she would not learn the four new same-sized tires, regardless of their being .6" smaller in diameter than the factory ones.

Fingers crossed.

Mark
Minneapolis, MN
 

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My 2019 Pilot has TPMS sensors in each wheel, so I assume that your 2017 does, also. Which means that you have the direct TPMS. That's why your Pilot recognizes the OEM wheels/tires in your garage. You need to have the sensors in your Odyssey wheels(assuming that it has them) scanned & programed to the Pilot. You might find that one or more of the sensors in the Odyssey wheels are defective due to age.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks and Ugh. So much for my research. And so much for Discount Tire's tech's expertise.

I don't see how all of the tpms sensors in the old 2014 Odyssey tires could be faulty though. They all were working fine on the van until she blew up on black friday. I pulled the tires off the van and mounted on the Pilot only a month later on christmas day. Because all 4 are not being recognized, there still has to be some disconnect between the sensors in the wheels and the system that reads them. Guess I will need to find a mechanic with knowledge of these specific systems to check it out. Maybe the 2014 Odyssey's sensors are not compatible with the 2017 Pilot, which would surprise me, or still need to somehow be reprogrammed.

Thanks again for correcting me. Will not let this issue beat me!

Mark
 

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I think you just need to have the Odyssey sensors reprogrammed to the Pilot.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks again for the advice, everyone.

Whether direct or indirect, those instructions from paramus honda do not apply because the 17 Pilot has no button or menu item to reset, calibrate, or initialize the tpms system. There is a thread on this forum where the users that posted stated the 17 Pilot (although Touring) relearns properly set up wheel sensors on its own just by driving it. I mistook this to possibly mean it was an indirect system, especially after the info Discount Tire provided yesterday. When I put the honda link system into diagnostic mode, I see two items labeled tpms, but I don’t know what, if anything, to do with them.

I am going to try to get the van tires’ sensors reprogrammed and see where I end up thereafter.

Thanks again, all,

Mark
Minneapolis, MN
 

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I run a 17" winter wheel/tire setup on my 18 Pilot EX-L. There is no calibration necessary, just drive it. I bought the package from TireRack. Maybe new TMPS sensors would be the most direct route. IMG_1471.JPG
 

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2014 Ody uses 315 mhz sensors. The Pilot uses 433 mhz sensors. You need to upgrade your sensors.
 
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The Pilot does have a direct TPMS system, it displays pressure while the vehicle is stationary. Most likely it is part of the valve stem (older systems used a sensor attached to the wheel using a band, but most automakers have abandoned that approach).

There is a really cool feature that is part of it, hidden in the back of the owner's manual (p. 645). I have a 2017 model.

Before I had a reliable pressure gauge, I used to inflate the car while I had it on (without the engine actually turning). Fill tire a bit, go to the driver's side window check pressure, fill a bit more, check again, and so on. As I was doing that I noticed a pattern of beeps and light flashes, which changed when the pressure was just right. Hmm....

Enter TPMS Fill Assist!

"TPMS with Tire Fill Assist provides visual and audible assistance during tire pressure adjustment. With the power mode in ON, while you adjust tire pressure up or down, the system alerts you as follows:
Below recommended pressure: The beeper sounds and exterior lights flash once every five seconds.
At recommended pressure: The beeper sounds and exterior lights flash rapidly for ~ five seconds. Above recommended pressure: The beeper sounds and lights flash twice every three seconds."

In short, this system will help you inflate the tire to the optimal pressure without having to run back and forth between inflating a tire and checking pressure on the dashboard. Such a clever feature, I wish Honda made it stand out a little more in the manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Quick follow-up in case it may help someone facing similar issue. Ordered honda tpms sensors from Bernardis for $28 a piece. Because Bernardi’s site said customers who purchased the sensors also bought the nuts, washers, and oring seals, I ordered those too, but when everything arrived, the sensors had in their bags the associated parts already, so I spent a few dollars for those bits and pieces that I did not need.

Even though it was 10 degrees F in my garage, I worked myself into a sweat trying to break the bead on the first winter tire to install the sensor myself. Between their having been mounted three years ago and the cold temp, I could not break the bead. Realized I needed help or a specialized bead breaker tool. Discount Tire’s online marketing person had responded to me in another thread, apologizing for their store manager’s indirect/direct mistake described above, so I went back there to seek help on installing the sensors. They did it for $10 a wheel. Sales rep told me I would have to come back after I mounted wheels on my Pilot to have the sensors programmed for free, which was also wrong advice but the offer was nice. After installing the wheels on the Pilot, I barely drove 4 blocks before the screen showed each tire’s air pressure jump to exactly 58 psi, and then one by one settle down to the 35 lbs I had in each tire.

Everything is good now. Thank you all for your expert advice!
 
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