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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I searched all over and I could not find any spark plug replacement threads for my 2016 Honda Pilot. I found a few on the older generations but none for my generation.
The good news is that is almost identical to previous generations with a few differences.
1) I used same tools as every other video I have seen (3/8 spark plug socket, three 3 inch extension but, you can probably do it with less or any other combination that may work or have available to you.
2) The electrical connections to the coils are inside a rubber cover but, it works the same way as before. You pinch the top of the connector and then pull up to remove it. However, you just go by feel since you cannot see it.
3) To remove the middle coil/plug I had to remove a black metal cover protecting the fan. The good thing about it is...it is held with two screws, easy to remove, and then slides to the right side. After I removed this cover, I had enough room to remove the coil/plug.
4) The set up of three plugs in the back are identical to the front with the only difference is you will not be able to see them. You can use a mirror but, once you replaced the front plugs, you will know what need to do by feel.
5) I got my NGK plugs from RockAuto for a fraction of the cost from a stealership but you can get them from whatever your favorite suppliers is. I do have 99,351 miles on my 16 Touring Pilot.
The job is not that difficult to do so if you are on the fence...do it. I will try to post some pictures and hopefully it will make sense.
Good luck!
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While the plugs were out, did you check/adjust the valve clearance?
I don't think he pulled the valve covers off, did he?
I still haven't done my 08- 192K miles. Plan to = one day.

* Those 'old' plugs were fine. sure a little mark on the insulator. Still had 100K in them LOL

Good job on the write up OP
 

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Planning to wait until you reach 105,000 miles?
You shouldn't really need to inspect them unless they're noisy. Wouldn't hurt I guess, but to me it doesn't make a ton of sense to pull the valve covers and risk making a nice new leak just to check them. If you're going through that trouble might as well have them adjusted at the same time.

I have a 2012 Accord and had the valves done last month. At 163k miles, all intake valves were very lose and the exhaust on both heads were on the tight side. I had it done because they were extremely loud.
 

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You shouldn't really need to inspect them unless they're noisy. Wouldn't hurt I guess, but to me it doesn't make a ton of sense to pull the valve covers and risk making a nice new leak just to check them.
How will a "nice new leak" be created if you replace the valve cover gaskets before reinstalling the valve covers?
 

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How will a "nice new leak" be created if you replace the valve cover gaskets before reinstalling the valve covers?
It's just one of those things where you're creating an opportunity for a problem. Didn't necessarily mean you're guaranteed to end up with a leak, it's just a possibility if you don't get the gasket set perfectly or don't get a bolt torqued back correctly.
 

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I searched all over and I could not find any spark plug replacement threads for my 2016 Honda Pilot. I found a few on the older generations but none for my generation.
The good news is that is almost identical to previous generations with a few differences.
1) I used same tools as every other video I have seen (3/8 spark plug socket, three 3 inch extension but, you can probably do it with less or any other combination that may work or have available to you.
2) The electrical connections to the coils are inside a rubber cover but, it works the same way as before. You pinch the top of the connector and then pull up to remove it. However, you just go by feel since you cannot see it.
3) To remove the middle coil/plug I had to remove a black metal cover protecting the fan. The good thing about it is...it is held with two screws, easy to remove, and then slides to the right side. After I removed this cover, I had enough room to remove the coil/plug.
4) The set up of three plugs in the back are identical to the front with the only difference is you will not be able to see them. You can use a mirror but, once you replaced the front plugs, you will know what need to do by feel.
5) I got my NGK plugs from RockAuto for a fraction of the cost from a stealership but you can get them from whatever your favorite suppliers is. I do have 99,351 miles on my 16 Touring Pilot.
The job is not that difficult to do so if you are on the fence...do it. I will try to post some pictures and hopefully it will make sense.
Good luck! View attachment 147517 View attachment 147518 View attachment 147519 View attachment 147520 View attachment 147521
I'm having a hell of a time with the connectors under the rubber. How did you get them off. I can't find any videos or other post besides yours about doing the plugs on a 2016 pilot
 

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I believe the rubber says "press". Push the clip in 1st. Sometimes it gets hung. Then press clip and pull. A gentle twist of a standard screwdriver at the base of the clip can help move it upward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just like Nail Grease said, push it in first or try a different one. Once you get the first one out, you will figure it out. You have to do the front three since you will not be able to see the ones in the back. Good luck.
 

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I just did my wife's 2016 EX-L. Aside from one minor thing, OP's procedure was spot on. The hardest part for me was removing those damn coil connections. Initially, I had a hell of a time removing the front coil connectors. What I did was move the rubber covers out of the way so I can physically see the part where you push the connector to get it loose. You have to push hard and once you hear a slight click, you know it's loose.

OP said to remove the metal cover to remove the middle coil? For me, there was enough leeway that I could "slide" the coil out of the way without removing that metal cover. Hope that helps. It's really not that bad of a job. Make sure the engine is cold when removing the rear spark plugs.
 

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I just did my wife's 2016 EX-L. Aside from one minor thing, OP's procedure was spot on. The hardest part for me was removing those damn coil connections. Initially, I had a hell of a time removing the front coil connectors. What I did was move the rubber covers out of the way so I can physically see the part where you push the connector to get it loose. You have to push hard and once you hear a slight click, you know it's loose.

OP said to remove the metal cover to remove the middle coil? For me, there was enough leeway that I could "slide" the coil out of the way without removing that metal cover. Hope that helps. It's really not that bad of a job. Make sure the engine is cold when removing the rear spark plugs.
watuzi, how did you manage the connectors on the 3 back coils? We just tried to do it this morning and we were only successful in getting 2 of the fronts removed! I had not read your post at that time, however. Local dealer wants nearly $400 but says that the labor is not much at all. They want $60 for each plug!! I did purchase mine from Rock Auto for much, much, much less.
 

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watuzi, how did you manage the connectors on the 3 back coils? We just tried to do it this morning and we were only successful in getting 2 of the fronts removed! I had not read your post at that time, however. Local dealer wants nearly $400 but says that the labor is not much at all. They want $60 for each plug!! I did purchase mine from Rock Auto for much, much, much less.
When removing conectors, I'm sure you know to press the release clip. These can sometimes get hung. Push the connector in, press clip, then pull. You can use a small standard screwdriver at the base of the clip and give a gentle twist to move the clip upwards.
 

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What did u gap them at and also the torque to tighten?
The NGK Laser Iridiums come gapped at .044 right out of the box, but ya, the spark plugs should be torqued, but if it saved me $50 a spark plug, I'd stop at firmly snugg. 😏
 
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When removing conectors, I'm sure you know to press the release clip. These can sometimes get hung. Push the connector in, press clip, then pull. You can use a small standard screwdriver at the base of the clip and give a gentle twist to move the clip upwards.
Thanks, Nail Grease. My brother-in-law, my nephew and myself attempted to remove the connectors on the front, with limited success. We tried your method and the only way we removed 2 of them was to PUSH and pry with a screwdriver which broke the retaining clip on the removed connector. We determined that we would not be able to get the rear connections loose, so we buttoned everything back up and I will start a Go Fund Me so I can take it to a shop for repair! My brother-in-law has a 2 lift shop and has performed varieties of repairs from A/C system replacements, timing belt/water pump replacement, brakes, fuel systems, etc. He was stumped and we were all surprised at the lack of any videos showing the proper removal of the connectors. Thank you for your reply and I'll just move on from this one!
 

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Thanks, Nail Grease. My brother-in-law, my nephew and myself attempted to remove the connectors on the front, with limited success. We tried your method and the only way we removed 2 of them was to PUSH and pry with a screwdriver which broke the retaining clip on the removed connector. We determined that we would not be able to get the rear connections loose, so we buttoned everything back up and I will start a Go Fund Me so I can take it to a shop for repair! My brother-in-law has a 2 lift shop and has performed varieties of repairs from A/C system replacements, timing belt/water pump replacement, brakes, fuel systems, etc. He was stumped and we were all surprised at the lack of any videos showing the proper removal of the connectors. Thank you for your reply and I'll just move on from this one!
The large throttle control connector can be difficult to remove. If there were no signs of grime, or fluid from an accidental spill, I'd check the wiring. People have had critters chew on wiring. Sorry for your troubles.
 

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The NGK Laser Iridiums come gapped at .044 right out of the box, but ya, the spark plugs should be torqued, but if it saved me $50 a spark plug, I'd stop at firmly snugg. 😏
I concur with what Nail Grease is saying that they should come gapped at .044 however I would recommend you take a couple of seconds to check the gap yourself. There have been other threads in the past where members have reported that the gap was slightly off with the NGK plugs straight from the box. Things happen.
 

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I concur with what Nail Grease is saying that they should come gapped at .044 however I would recommend you take a couple of seconds to check the gap yourself. There have been other threads in the past where members have reported that the gap was slight off with the NGK plugs straight from the box. Things happen.
I guess it's possible. My worry is if someone bought the cheap gap tool. If you pry on the inner thin wire electrode, you will destroy a $13 spark plug. It requires one of these...
 
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