Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

21 - 40 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Recalls and TSBs are released according to NHTSA regulations; not at the discretion of the automaker. Issuance of such TSBs and Recalls are also not at the discretion of the automaker. However, the automaker takes proper steps to address concerns, though those concerns are not met in a timely fashion.

Injectors WILL be replaced as a set, not individually, by the dealership under any TSB or recall. The Honda Ridgeline had the fuel pump machining issue and the recall was sent out immediately and many affected folks got their's serviced promptly and are problem free.

Typically the initial run of vehicles have issues, all automakers and all models. Some customers do not face issues, while others are running around with loaners for the most of their ownership. Mid-year refresh cleans up a lot of the issues and with the platform, technology, driveline, etc etc, being shared between various Honda & Acura models, some of these are already sorted out, when they get introduced in the 'refresh'. So yes, you could anticipate far less issues with the 2020 MY than the 2016 MY units.

The sentiment that Honda is standoff-ish is a common remark in basically every single forum I visit; This, OdyClub and ROC. This is primarily by handful of people who experience that particular type of issue. However, it is not widespread, and though it is a headache for the one who starts such a thread, it is to be understood that not all vehicles are affected and surely it is not a 'trend', that should deter you from doing your research on that vehicle.

Out of warranty work, or Good Faith work, by dealerships are hard to navigate by those dealerships. Mind you, 'Honda Dealership' is privately owned and they have to 'purchase' vehicles that are in their lot. Sales of these 'dealership purchased' units is what qualifies a dealership for any special showcase, and allocations. So every dealership, selling the same brand, is in competition with each other and struggle to stay afloat. Doing proper research on a vehicle, prior to purchase, helps us be aware of pitfalls that are inherent to a vehicle and this way when the 'dealership' washes their hand on us, we are not looking at the automaker with disgust. Once your vehicle is sold to you, it is your problem. Dealership does not owe you anything because you bought the vehicle from them. The only reason (besides basic decency) the dealership will fight for you, is to get you on their service & maintenance and also potential future sales from 'their' dealership.

2016 Pilot TSBs >> TrueDelta | Honda Pilot Technical Service Bulletins (TSBs)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Needless to say, the 2016 Honda Pilot is a complete disappointment. I am ready to seek the help of a class action lawsuit attorney if these problems persist. I bought a $40K car so that I wouldn't have to buy another car for a good 10 years. Unfortunately, I am going to probably have to dump this car and trade it in before the problems persist. Who knows what will happen as the mileage increases on the car?! I don't even want to think about it. Good luck to everyone else in the same boat. I guess Toyota just gained a new customer as a result of all of this nonsense.
I just had my 2016 Pilot with 28K miles fixed on 2/5/2020 and the repair was $1900. Honda wouldn't cover it because it was after my warranty expired on 11/25/2019. I filed a complaint through Hondaproblems.com. If you have to get your vehicle in for a repair with fuel injectors issue, please contact Honda and file a complaint. The more people complaints, the better for Honda to take action. This issue should be covered as an extended warranty by Honda.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I had my fuel injectors on my 2016 replaced last week at 49K miles. It was covered under my extended warranty.

I did learn this the issue goes beyond the Pilot. It also impacts the other V6 engines as Honda redesigned the fuel injectors and there have been issues across the board...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
As for you guys that are outside of 3/36 warranty, I'd recommend (as i do with my own families pilots 16+) performing fuel induction services periodically. Such as sea foam, around a half a can every 1000 miles or so. It will really cut down on the carbon build up which is a major issue for these fuel injectors. My family members 2016 Pilot has around 85k miles. It coded for injectors @ 32k miles. Cleared dtc's and performed the software update, instructed them to perform seafoam treatment into the fuel tank, codes never returned. So for you guys that haven't had them replaced yet or replaced before updated parts were released, this i my recommendation for you guys. The inherent design with direct injection many manufacturers experience carbon fouling to some degree. Fuel induction services should be apart of your regular maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
I just had my 2016 Pilot with 28K miles fixed on 2/5/2020 and the repair was $1900. Honda wouldn't cover it because it was after my warranty expired on 11/25/2019. I filed a complaint through Hondaproblems.com. If you have to get your vehicle in for a repair with fuel injectors issue, please contact Honda and file a complaint. The more people complaints, the better for Honda to take action. This issue should be covered as an extended warranty by Honda.
What state are you in as different states have different emission warranties which cover the injectors and other items for various periods?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I recently took my 2017 into the dealership for an "emissions" light. They said it was 50/50 that it would be under warranty or not. They ran the scans and did some digging to find out that it ws under warranty. I don't remember the actual code, but they replaced the injectors and rails. He told me that this problem was fixed on the new body style, so take that as you will... While I was there waiting on the work to be done, I actually walked out with a 2020, so I guess we'll find out soon enough :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Last week, I got the dreaded "Emissions System Problem" light, among a host other lights. I took the car into a Honda dealership the next day and both employees I initially spoke with said "unfortunately, it's probably the fuel injectors and it's going to cost about $1800 to repair". After running the diagnostic testing, sure enough, the report came back with misfires in three cylinders and the conclusion was that I needed all six fuel injectors replaced, for $1900! I have approximately 70K miles on my car, so it seemed a bit odd to me that I should need all new fuel injectors. I immediately called American Honda and requested "Goodwill Assistance". I have owned six Honda vehicles, including my 2016 Pilot and I have never had issues like this at 70K miles. (A few months back, I also had the transmission problem with the "judder", and I learned that my transmission fluid was degrading prematurely and I needed new fluid and the computer software updated. Needless to say, I was not surprised at yet another problem with this car.)

Last weekend I had time to do a lot of research on the fuel injector issue, and I cannot believe how many complaints I am finding online. Most frustrating, was when I found various forum posts online that tie this issue to Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) 18-025. This TSB, which was released in March 2018, states that the "probable cause" for this issue is due to an issue at the factory during the manufacturing process. My first question is how on earth could Honda not notify customers of this potential problem while so many customers were still under the 3 year/36,000 warranty? Well, when I asked the "Case Manager" that I dealt with at American Honda this exact question, her (very un-empathetic) response was "we are not going to notify the entire country" ... "your fuel injectors would not have been replaced two years ago if there was nothing wrong with them". Really? Maybe there was something wrong with them when I could have easily had it covered under warranty or maybe Honda could have notified customers, if nothing else, for their own safety! I find this issue unbelievable. However, I am not surprised especially after learning that American Honda was fined 70 million dollars in 2015, by the government, for under reporting safety information. Unfortunately, Honda has a ton of negative publicity and seems to have really lost their competitive advantage recently due to their lack of quality and transparency.

After waiting one week for the outcome of my goodwill assistance request, Honda did come through and cover all but $200 of my new fuel injector repair cost. Now, in actuality, its also important to note that the cost of this repair, without extreme markup, is about $1200. So, Honda "paid" for approximately $1000 of my repair. Considering Honda knew about this problem years ago and failed to notify their customers in a timely fashion, I still think Honda should have paid 100% of the repair cost. I strongly urge anyone else this happens to, to demand that American Honda pay a significant portion of the repair bill. Had American Honda not paid for the bulk of my repair, I would have paid for it myself and then sued them in Small Claims Court. I checked court records and in my state, there are a lot of pending and settled cases against American Honda. I may very well go that route next if I have to sink any more money into the transmission system issue. Of course, when I got home and I reviewed the results of my multi point inspection, I am being told that my transmission fluid needs attention again; I just had it changed 10K miles ago?! How can this car possibly need new transmission fluid again after driving only 10K miles. Something is not right.

Needless to say, the 2016 Honda Pilot is a complete disappointment. I am ready to seek the help of a class action lawsuit attorney if these problems persist. I bought a $40K car so that I wouldn't have to buy another car for a good 10 years. Unfortunately, I am going to probably have to dump this car and trade it in before the problems persist. Who knows what will happen as the mileage increases on the car?! I don't even want to think about it. Good luck to everyone else in the same boat. I guess Toyota just gained a new customer as a result of all of this nonsense.

I have also reported problems with this car to:
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Hondaproblems.com
  • Better Business Bureau
I think the only way American Honda may ever be held accountable for such quality issues and a complete lack of transparency is if everyone with issues speaks up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Last week, I got the dreaded "Emissions System Problem" light, among a host other lights. I took the car into a Honda dealership the next day and both employees I initially spoke with said "unfortunately, it's probably the fuel injectors and it's going to cost about $1800 to repair". After running the diagnostic testing, sure enough, the report came back with misfires in three cylinders and the conclusion was that I needed all six fuel injectors replaced, for $1900! I have approximately 70K miles on my car, so it seemed a bit odd to me that I should need all new fuel injectors. I immediately called American Honda and requested "Goodwill Assistance". I have owned six Honda vehicles, including my 2016 Pilot and I have never had issues like this at 70K miles. (A few months back, I also had the transmission problem with the "judder", and I learned that my transmission fluid was degrading prematurely and I needed new fluid and the computer software updated. Needless to say, I was not surprised at yet another problem with this car.)

Last weekend I had time to do a lot of research on the fuel injector issue, and I cannot believe how many complaints I am finding online. Most frustrating, was when I found various forum posts online that tie this issue to Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) 18-025. This TSB, which was released in March 2018, states that the "probable cause" for this issue is due to an issue at the factory during the manufacturing process. My first question is how on earth could Honda not notify customers of this potential problem while so many customers were still under the 3 year/36,000 warranty? Well, when I asked the "Case Manager" that I dealt with at American Honda this exact question, her (very un-empathetic) response was "we are not going to notify the entire country" ... "your fuel injectors would not have been replaced two years ago if there was nothing wrong with them". Really? Maybe there was something wrong with them when I could have easily had it covered under warranty or maybe Honda could have notified customers, if nothing else, for their own safety! I find this issue unbelievable. However, I am not surprised especially after learning that American Honda was fined 70 million dollars in 2015, by the government, for under reporting safety information. Unfortunately, Honda has a ton of negative publicity and seems to have really lost their competitive advantage recently due to their lack of quality and transparency.

After waiting one week for the outcome of my goodwill assistance request, Honda did come through and cover all but $200 of my new fuel injector repair cost. Now, in actuality, its also important to note that the cost of this repair, without extreme markup, is about $1200. So, Honda "paid" for approximately $1000 of my repair. Considering Honda knew about this problem years ago and failed to notify their customers in a timely fashion, I still think Honda should have paid 100% of the repair cost. I strongly urge anyone else this happens to, to demand that American Honda pay a significant portion of the repair bill. Had American Honda not paid for the bulk of my repair, I would have paid for it myself and then sued them in Small Claims Court. I checked court records and in my state, there are a lot of pending and settled cases against American Honda. I may very well go that route next if I have to sink any more money into the transmission system issue. Of course, when I got home and I reviewed the results of my multi point inspection, I am being told that my transmission fluid needs attention again; I just had it changed 10K miles ago?! How can this car possibly need new transmission fluid again after driving only 10K miles. Something is not right.

Needless to say, the 2016 Honda Pilot is a complete disappointment. I am ready to seek the help of a class action lawsuit attorney if these problems persist. I bought a $40K car so that I wouldn't have to buy another car for a good 10 years. Unfortunately, I am going to probably have to dump this car and trade it in before the problems persist. Who knows what will happen as the mileage increases on the car?! I don't even want to think about it. Good luck to everyone else in the same boat. I guess Toyota just gained a new customer as a result of all of this nonsense.

I have also reported problems with this car to:
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Hondaproblems.com
  • Better Business Bureau
I think the only way American Honda may ever be held accountable for such quality issues and a complete lack of transparency is if everyone with issues speaks up!
I feel your pain! I really do! AT 60K miles I started getting that lovely little light. First it was 'oh let's upgrade your computer', then it was you need a new Catalytic converter. Finally changed out the converter at 72k miles. This will be my LAST Honda!

susan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Last week, I got the dreaded "Emissions System Problem" light, among a host other lights. I took the car into a Honda dealership the next day and both employees I initially spoke with said "unfortunately, it's probably the fuel injectors and it's going to cost about $1800 to repair". After running the diagnostic testing, sure enough, the report came back with misfires in three cylinders and the conclusion was that I needed all six fuel injectors replaced, for $1900! I have approximately 70K miles on my car, so it seemed a bit odd to me that I should need all new fuel injectors. I immediately called American Honda and requested "Goodwill Assistance". I have owned six Honda vehicles, including my 2016 Pilot and I have never had issues like this at 70K miles. (A few months back, I also had the transmission problem with the "judder", and I learned that my transmission fluid was degrading prematurely and I needed new fluid and the computer software updated. Needless to say, I was not surprised at yet another problem with this car.)

Last weekend I had time to do a lot of research on the fuel injector issue, and I cannot believe how many complaints I am finding online. Most frustrating, was when I found various forum posts online that tie this issue to Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) 18-025. This TSB, which was released in March 2018, states that the "probable cause" for this issue is due to an issue at the factory during the manufacturing process. My first question is how on earth could Honda not notify customers of this potential problem while so many customers were still under the 3 year/36,000 warranty? Well, when I asked the "Case Manager" that I dealt with at American Honda this exact question, her (very un-empathetic) response was "we are not going to notify the entire country" ... "your fuel injectors would not have been replaced two years ago if there was nothing wrong with them". Really? Maybe there was something wrong with them when I could have easily had it covered under warranty or maybe Honda could have notified customers, if nothing else, for their own safety! I find this issue unbelievable. However, I am not surprised especially after learning that American Honda was fined 70 million dollars in 2015, by the government, for under reporting safety information. Unfortunately, Honda has a ton of negative publicity and seems to have really lost their competitive advantage recently due to their lack of quality and transparency.

After waiting one week for the outcome of my goodwill assistance request, Honda did come through and cover all but $200 of my new fuel injector repair cost. Now, in actuality, its also important to note that the cost of this repair, without extreme markup, is about $1200. So, Honda "paid" for approximately $1000 of my repair. Considering Honda knew about this problem years ago and failed to notify their customers in a timely fashion, I still think Honda should have paid 100% of the repair cost. I strongly urge anyone else this happens to, to demand that American Honda pay a significant portion of the repair bill. Had American Honda not paid for the bulk of my repair, I would have paid for it myself and then sued them in Small Claims Court. I checked court records and in my state, there are a lot of pending and settled cases against American Honda. I may very well go that route next if I have to sink any more money into the transmission system issue. Of course, when I got home and I reviewed the results of my multi point inspection, I am being told that my transmission fluid needs attention again; I just had it changed 10K miles ago?! How can this car possibly need new transmission fluid again after driving only 10K miles. Something is not right.

Needless to say, the 2016 Honda Pilot is a complete disappointment. I am ready to seek the help of a class action lawsuit attorney if these problems persist. I bought a $40K car so that I wouldn't have to buy another car for a good 10 years. Unfortunately, I am going to probably have to dump this car and trade it in before the problems persist. Who knows what will happen as the mileage increases on the car?! I don't even want to think about it. Good luck to everyone else in the same boat. I guess Toyota just gained a new customer as a result of all of this nonsense.

I have also reported problems with this car to:
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Hondaproblems.com
  • Better Business Bureau
I think the only way American Honda may ever be held accountable for such quality issues and a complete lack of transparency is if everyone with issues speaks up!
Iam glad you called American Honda more people should stand up for your vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
I feel your pain! I really do! AT 60K miles I started getting that lovely little light. First it was 'oh let's upgrade your computer', then it was you need a new Catalytic converter. Finally changed out the converter at 72k miles. This will be my LAST Honda!

susan
Agreed! I will never purchase another Honda again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Iam glad you called American Honda more people should stand up for your vehicle
Yes! More people should definitely stand up and let Honda know this is completely unacceptable. If nothing else, Honda should be letting people know for their own safety! I drive thousands of miles every year for my business and I am so glad that I have never been stranded on the road in this car, especially in the winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I think I'll just drive my '05 to it's grave. Engine purrs,uses no oil in 5K changes. Trans shifts normally,no leaks.
196K. The build quality is great. I found a dealer maintained,garaged LX 90K miles for $5900 on Craigslist here. I told my wife we should scoop it up. "But it's got 90K on it!" Sheesh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Last week, I got the dreaded "Emissions System Problem" light, among a host other lights. I took the car into a Honda dealership the next day and both employees I initially spoke with said "unfortunately, it's probably the fuel injectors and it's going to cost about $1800 to repair". After running the diagnostic testing, sure enough, the report came back with misfires in three cylinders and the conclusion was that I needed all six fuel injectors replaced, for $1900! I have approximately 70K miles on my car, so it seemed a bit odd to me that I should need all new fuel injectors. I immediately called American Honda and requested "Goodwill Assistance". I have owned six Honda vehicles, including my 2016 Pilot and I have never had issues like this at 70K miles. (A few months back, I also had the transmission problem with the "judder", and I learned that my transmission fluid was degrading prematurely and I needed new fluid and the computer software updated. Needless to say, I was not surprised at yet another problem with this car.)

Last weekend I had time to do a lot of research on the fuel injector issue, and I cannot believe how many complaints I am finding online. Most frustrating, was when I found various forum posts online that tie this issue to Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) 18-025. This TSB, which was released in March 2018, states that the "probable cause" for this issue is due to an issue at the factory during the manufacturing process. My first question is how on earth could Honda not notify customers of this potential problem while so many customers were still under the 3 year/36,000 warranty? Well, when I asked the "Case Manager" that I dealt with at American Honda this exact question, her (very un-empathetic) response was "we are not going to notify the entire country" ... "your fuel injectors would not have been replaced two years ago if there was nothing wrong with them". Really? Maybe there was something wrong with them when I could have easily had it covered under warranty or maybe Honda could have notified customers, if nothing else, for their own safety! I find this issue unbelievable. However, I am not surprised especially after learning that American Honda was fined 70 million dollars in 2015, by the government, for under reporting safety information. Unfortunately, Honda has a ton of negative publicity and seems to have really lost their competitive advantage recently due to their lack of quality and transparency.

After waiting one week for the outcome of my goodwill assistance request, Honda did come through and cover all but $200 of my new fuel injector repair cost. Now, in actuality, its also important to note that the cost of this repair, without extreme markup, is about $1200. So, Honda "paid" for approximately $1000 of my repair. Considering Honda knew about this problem years ago and failed to notify their customers in a timely fashion, I still think Honda should have paid 100% of the repair cost. I strongly urge anyone else this happens to, to demand that American Honda pay a significant portion of the repair bill. Had American Honda not paid for the bulk of my repair, I would have paid for it myself and then sued them in Small Claims Court. I checked court records and in my state, there are a lot of pending and settled cases against American Honda. I may very well go that route next if I have to sink any more money into the transmission system issue. Of course, when I got home and I reviewed the results of my multi point inspection, I am being told that my transmission fluid needs attention again; I just had it changed 10K miles ago?! How can this car possibly need new transmission fluid again after driving only 10K miles. Something is not right.

Needless to say, the 2016 Honda Pilot is a complete disappointment. I am ready to seek the help of a class action lawsuit attorney if these problems persist. I bought a $40K car so that I wouldn't have to buy another car for a good 10 years. Unfortunately, I am going to probably have to dump this car and trade it in before the problems persist. Who knows what will happen as the mileage increases on the car?! I don't even want to think about it. Good luck to everyone else in the same boat. I guess Toyota just gained a new customer as a result of all of this nonsense.

I have also reported problems with this car to:
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Hondaproblems.com
  • Better Business Bureau
I think the only way American Honda may ever be held accountable for such quality issues and a complete lack of transparency is if everyone with issues speaks up!
Hi! I emathize with you. My story is the same at 60K Honda America nor my local Honda service manager would do nothing fo rme , even with the copies of the TSB that they then redefined to omit issue with manufacturing and then labeled cause as clogged fuel line. YES! Do to faulty manufactured fuel injectors that shave metal parts into the fule line. I now have to ad additives every oill change. My first Honda, my last. Will be trading shortly for a Kia Telluride. 100K/10 yr warranty on new cars. I' e done a lot of research, they will be the new Totyota, Honda, Nissan trustworthy dealer . Good luck! I finally had to quit the process because it was making me sick. Don't need their bad choices ruining my health. Shame on them. Look at my posts here under Merina.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
.................... YES! Do to faulty manufactured fuel injectors that shave metal parts into the fule line. ..............
I believe you meant to say the high pressure fuel pump; The recall was for the manufacturing process of the fuel pump, not the fuel injectors.
As you know, fuel injectors and the intake electric fuel pump are the opposite ends of the fuel system. The high pressure fuel pump sits between those. The shavings clog the fuel injectors (by lodging themselves in the injector screen).

Have you asked for a second or third opinion from a different dealership? If your VIN qualifies, the TSB & recall work will be performed promptly when the parts come by.
BTW, Kia/Hyundai is a good brand and they have bumped up their production of crossovers as the demand is very high. Jan 2020 sales figures were not too promising for the Pilot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
I would constantly check the Honda Owners site, as it appears that the Warrenties do get updated. Finally a benefit to living in one of those “B” states 🤣
I'll take worse warranties, less government control, and more freedom for $800, Alex. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Last week, I got the dreaded "Emissions System Problem" light, among a host other lights. I took the car into a Honda dealership the next day and both employees I initially spoke with said "unfortunately, it's probably the fuel injectors and it's going to cost about $1800 to repair". After running the diagnostic testing, sure enough, the report came back with misfires in three cylinders and the conclusion was that I needed all six fuel injectors replaced, for $1900! I have approximately 70K miles on my car, so it seemed a bit odd to me that I should need all new fuel injectors. I immediately called American Honda and requested "Goodwill Assistance". I have owned six Honda vehicles, including my 2016 Pilot and I have never had issues like this at 70K miles. (A few months back, I also had the transmission problem with the "judder", and I learned that my transmission fluid was degrading prematurely and I needed new fluid and the computer software updated. Needless to say, I was not surprised at yet another problem with this car.)

Last weekend I had time to do a lot of research on the fuel injector issue, and I cannot believe how many complaints I am finding online. Most frustrating, was when I found various forum posts online that tie this issue to Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) 18-025. This TSB, which was released in March 2018, states that the "probable cause" for this issue is due to an issue at the factory during the manufacturing process. My first question is how on earth could Honda not notify customers of this potential problem while so many customers were still under the 3 year/36,000 warranty? Well, when I asked the "Case Manager" that I dealt with at American Honda this exact question, her (very un-empathetic) response was "we are not going to notify the entire country" ... "your fuel injectors would not have been replaced two years ago if there was nothing wrong with them". Really? Maybe there was something wrong with them when I could have easily had it covered under warranty or maybe Honda could have notified customers, if nothing else, for their own safety! I find this issue unbelievable. However, I am not surprised especially after learning that American Honda was fined 70 million dollars in 2015, by the government, for under reporting safety information. Unfortunately, Honda has a ton of negative publicity and seems to have really lost their competitive advantage recently due to their lack of quality and transparency.

After waiting one week for the outcome of my goodwill assistance request, Honda did come through and cover all but $200 of my new fuel injector repair cost. Now, in actuality, its also important to note that the cost of this repair, without extreme markup, is about $1200. So, Honda "paid" for approximately $1000 of my repair. Considering Honda knew about this problem years ago and failed to notify their customers in a timely fashion, I still think Honda should have paid 100% of the repair cost. I strongly urge anyone else this happens to, to demand that American Honda pay a significant portion of the repair bill. Had American Honda not paid for the bulk of my repair, I would have paid for it myself and then sued them in Small Claims Court. I checked court records and in my state, there are a lot of pending and settled cases against American Honda. I may very well go that route next if I have to sink any more money into the transmission system issue. Of course, when I got home and I reviewed the results of my multi point inspection, I am being told that my transmission fluid needs attention again; I just had it changed 10K miles ago?! How can this car possibly need new transmission fluid again after driving only 10K miles. Something is not right.

Needless to say, the 2016 Honda Pilot is a complete disappointment. I am ready to seek the help of a class action lawsuit attorney if these problems persist. I bought a $40K car so that I wouldn't have to buy another car for a good 10 years. Unfortunately, I am going to probably have to dump this car and trade it in before the problems persist. Who knows what will happen as the mileage increases on the car?! I don't even want to think about it. Good luck to everyone else in the same boat. I guess Toyota just gained a new customer as a result of all of this nonsense.

I have also reported problems with this car to:
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Hondaproblems.com
  • Better Business Bureau
I think the only way American Honda may ever be held accountable for such quality issues and a complete lack of transparency is if everyone with issues speaks up!
Thanks for sharing. Not everyone has the problem because some read the owner's manual which tells you to add Fuel Additive like Fuel Injector Cleaner at every oil change. Lucas Gas Treatment is one. How many times did you add the required Gas additive to clean and lubricate your injectors? Ad Advanced Auto "Our Fuel Injectors OEM and aftermarket parts range from $43.99 to $121.16 for the Honda Pilot". They are simple to replace. There also mechanics that have fuel injector cleaning machines. All cars now use fuel injectors so it would be logical to add a gas additive every, 3 Oz if using Luca Gas treatment to the tank every 4 or 5 fill-ups or if using the small bottle of injector cleaner from another company the directions say to add the whole bottle when filling the tank up. Like any other moving part it must be clean and lubricated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
Good thing I did read the Owner's Manual! I added fuel injector cleaner approximately every 5K miles and I still had this issue. It's only right to read the directions for, and properly maintain, a $40K piece of equipment. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Thanks for sharing. Not everyone has the problem because some read the owner's manual which tells you to add Fuel Additive like Fuel Injector Cleaner at every oil change. Lucas Gas Treatment is one. How many times did you add the required Gas additive to clean and lubricate your injectors? Ad Advanced Auto "Our Fuel Injectors OEM and aftermarket parts range from $43.99 to $121.16 for the Honda Pilot". They are simple to replace. There also mechanics that have fuel injector cleaning machines. All cars now use fuel injectors so it would be logical to add a gas additive every, 3 Oz if using Luca Gas treatment to the tank every 4 or 5 fill-ups or if using the small bottle of injector cleaner from another company the directions say to add the whole bottle when filling the tank up. Like any other moving part it must be clean and lubricated.
134295

Hey, curious where you read that Fuel Additive comment. Not writing to doubt, just like you I read the manual cover to cover (the FULL manual too) and couldn’t find it. Above is the only info related to fuel I could find.
 
21 - 40 of 57 Posts
Top