Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I took the dive and bought the ONR two bucket kit off of Autogeek a couple months ago and finally took the dive to learn the method this morning. Got the new wheels put on last weekend and wanted to take pictures with the car cleaned up. Of note - it was around 30 degrees when I started and 38 or so by the time I finished. I did the Pilot and the Traverse.

For those looking for info on the wheels - they are 20x8.5 with a +55mm offset. The tires are 255/50R20. We have experienced absolutely no rubbing in the week we've had the new wheels and tires on. Power feels about the same and my wife's lead foot means mileage is poor regardless.

Process used:
  1. 1 oz or Optimum No Rinse per gallon since both cars were pretty heavily soiled. I did 3 gallons of water in each bucket, warm from the kitchen sink which made a big difference in my comfort because of how cold it is out. 1 of the buckets was straight water for rinsing the sponge.
  2. Big Red sponge from Optimum per detailing forum recommendations.
  3. It is weird how ONR doesn't foam up but it does feel slippery on the panel.
  4. Sponge in the ONR bucket, get some excess out and start on the panel. You shouldn't be using a lot of pressure. Finish the panel, sponge in the water bucket squeeze out a couple times then back to the ONR bucket.
  5. Now hit the panel with 2-3 sprays of your drying aid. I used Optimum Opti-Seal but there are a TON of products out there that do a good job and are reasonably priced.
  6. Dry the panel with a quality microfiber.
  7. Move to the next panel until you are done the car.
  8. I would wring out the microfiber every other panel and kept turning and folding to expose a new side.
  9. Took about 30 minutes to get around the car and this includes figuring out the process over the first couple panels. I take my time on the wheels and spent at least that much on them alone.
  10. I did not do the roof, but it can be done the same way. Laziness I guess.
  11. Wheels were done last after both cars, I did end up using a wheel and tire spray then dipped my tools in the ONR bucket. I wipe the tires dry with a dirty microfiber and did the normal Opti-Seal w/ microfiber on the wheels.
  12. Note I found this to not be very "aggressive", so leftover bug splatters or other more difficult debris on the paint remained after being cleaned.
  13. I did not focus much on the running boards or bare plastic parts on the Pilot. The lower part of the doors on the Traverse has more plastic so I did use it there and was satisfied.
What I will do differently:
  1. The Pilot is black. Black cars show EVERYTHING. I probably should have used multiple microfibers on the car to keep it cleaner, it is just a little streaky.
  2. Wait for warmer weather.
  3. I want to get one of the 1/2 gallon hand sprayers. I tend to wait a little too long between washes (because kids and life) so I would like to do a round of ONR through that to get the panels wet and help with extra lubricity when I put the sponge on it. Putting a sponge on a dry panel, especially one that is pretty soiled just feels wrong. I also think this may help with some of the more soiled areas.
  4. I want to use said hand sprayer on the wheels with clean water to rinse them before drying them. As it was I agitated the wheel and tire cleaner, then sort of threw a wet microfiber from the ONR bucket on it to sort of rinse it but I want to make sure that cleaner is rinsed off before moving to the drying aid stage.
Pics:

Automotive parking light Car Vehicle Grille Automotive lighting

Wheel Car Tire Vehicle Automotive tire

Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire

Wheel Tire Land vehicle Automotive side marker light Car

Wheel Automotive parking light Tire Automotive side marker light Car

Automotive tire Drinkware Wood Automotive wheel system Auto part

Sky Wheel Tire Car Vehicle

Wheel Tire Automotive side marker light Sky Car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Looks good. I'm also trying to take my personal detailing skills up a notch by paying closer attention to what and how I'm using what I have. Now you just have to find what will bring that trim back to life and you've got a really nice ride there.
 

·
Registered
2019 Pilot EX-L AWD, 265-60-18 Defender LTX M/S
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
@cintocrunch - wheels look good, Pilot looks good, nice shine. I like the headlight retrofit!

my wife's lead foot means mileage is poor regardless.
I think mine and yours might be related :ROFLMAO: .

My neighbor has a black '15 Pilot. I think he is at like 140k. Definitely NOT maintained like yours. He needs to bring it next week for power steering leak. His wife went to use it last week to go to work. It made the old Ford power steering pumps sound silent. She looked like she was trying to steer an old manual version. Temporary since she had to go to work- VML was all I had available (or DW-1, MTF or multiple viscosities of motor oil). Since other vehicles, including my son's Forte use that for PS fluid i figured that was best. 4 days later it's whining again so most of that is gone anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Looks good. I'm also trying to take my personal detailing skills up a notch by paying closer attention to what and how I'm using what I have. Now you just have to find what will bring that trim back to life and you've got a really nice ride there.
I'm really happy with the ONR experience. I think if I can keep up with it better knowing how quick and easy this was it will be even better results because the sponge and microfiber will be less soiled. I think if I let it get this soiled again I will go to a touchless wash (at least in the winter) first to help remove the heavy stuff.

For trim - I want to use Cerakote. Been watching a lot of videos and that seems to be the best stuff. This spring the Pilot needs a good polish and clay bar (yay black paint showing EVERY blemish) and I figured I'd do the trim at that time.

@cintocrunch - wheels look good, Pilot looks good, nice shine. I like the headlight retrofit!


I think mine and yours might be related :ROFLMAO: .

My neighbor has a black '15 Pilot. I think he is at like 140k. Definitely NOT maintained like yours. He needs to bring it next week for power steering leak. His wife went to use it last week to go to work. It made the old Ford power steering pumps sound silent. She looked like she was trying to steer an old manual version. Temporary since she had to go to work- VML was all I had available (or DW-1, MTF or multiple viscosities of motor oil). Since other vehicles, including my son's Forte use that for PS fluid i figured that was best. 4 days later it's whining again so most of that is gone anyway.
Thanks man! I do a power steering turkey baster suck and fill every oil change with the Honda fluid, that helps me keep tabs on the level pretty regularly. I'm not real interested in replacing steering components on most modern cars, they seem to be some of the most buried items in already cramped engine compartments. Have fun with that project and post up a how-to since more people will have as the vehicles age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
I do a power steering turkey baster suck and fill every oil change with the Honda fluid, that helps me keep tabs on the level pretty regularly. I'm not real interested in replacing steering components on most modern cars, they seem to be some of the most buried items in already cramped engine compartments.
That's actually a very good idea. I did the "Turkey Baster" method on a 2011 Cadillac but I did it over a 1 month period. I'd suck up all I could and then refill, drive around for for 2 or 3 days and do it again. It took me about 2 quarts of fluid to get it looking good again but it sure beats removing brake lines and bleeding them that way. And like you said, it gets you under the hood and looking at things i.e. checking connections, fluid, filters etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Cintocrunch…1st of all those wheels are bad a$$! Love them. Thanks for the write up. I so much want to do this ONR on my 2015 Pilot also…especially in these Michigan winters..but as you mentioned it just feels so wrong to put a sponge to a dirty crusted panel. I detail my own vehicle during the year. The Rag Company is where I get all of my high quality microfiber towels from. You mentioned a sprayer. Check out their website,…they have a variety of
IK hand held sprayers that are also high quality. I have one of their larger foam sprayers when I don’t feel like breaking out my pressure washer and foam cannon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cintocrunch…1st of all those wheels are bad a$$! Love them. Thanks for the write up. I so much want to do this ONR on my 2015 Pilot also…especially in these Michigan winters..but as you mentioned it just feels so wrong to put a sponge to a dirty crusted panel. I detail my own vehicle during the year. The Rag Company is where I get all of my high quality microfiber towels from. You mentioned a sprayer. Check out their website,…they have a variety of
IK hand held sprayers that are also high quality. I have one of their larger foam sprayers when I don’t feel like breaking out my pressure washer and foam cannon.
I have the IK sprayer combo pack (foamed and sprayer) coming to me for Christmas, so I’m going to be set!

I will likely take the vehicles to a high pressure spray wash or maybe turn my hose back on if they are salt crusted and I want to do a wash.
 

·
Registered
2019 Pilot EX-L AWD, 265-60-18 Defender LTX M/S
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
Moen used to have an outdoor faucet, frost free, mounted about 8 inches in the house. It had hot and cold lines going to it. It was great with the kids rinsing off before going in the pool. It was awesome for washing the cars in the winter. Turn the knob just like taking a shower.

Woodford has a 2 handle version.

Prier has a 1 handle like the Moen was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
I have the IK sprayer combo pack (foamed and sprayer) coming to me for Christmas, so I’m going to be set!

I will likely take the vehicles to a high pressure spray wash or maybe turn my hose back on if they are salt crusted and I want to do a wash.
Great Christmas present! I wish I could turn the hose back on in the winter...too risky here in Michigan. I do take it to a touchless wash in the winter and/or to a do it yourself high pressure wash,...especially for under the car..
Keep us updated with the ONR in the sprayer and how that works out for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Moen used to have an outdoor faucet, frost free, mounted about 8 inches in the house. It had hot and cold lines going to it. It was great with the kids rinsing off before going in the pool. It was awesome for washing the cars in the winter. Turn the knob just like taking a shower.

Woodford has a 2 handle version.

Prier has a 1 handle like the Moen was.
I would love to have that also...many times I thought about having the Woodford installed..supposed to be one of the best.
 

·
Registered
2019 Pilot EX-L AWD, 265-60-18 Defender LTX M/S
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
As long as your basement is not freezing then you shouldn't have an issue. Get one with a longer reach, insulate and seal well at the rim joist/wall but leave the longer pipes exposed to the warmth. Real easy to tap into existing piping with PEX and SharkBite fittings. I usually install a ball valve right by it anyway so easy to totally shut off if I'm really concerned on cold days.

The outdoor frost free faucets NEED to be pitched so water drains out. Most have an angled shim or the assembly is angled already. User needs to make sure they disconnect the hose also after use so the vacuum breaker can do it's thing and water does not sit preventing draining. I stretch the hose out fully also to drain it then coil it back up but disconnected.

My friends uncle flooded his basement. He had a regular cold only 8" frost free but never unhooked the hose. The faucet was in a cold corner with a small draft and plumber had insulated the entire assembly preventing basement heat from reaching it.

Watch the video on the Woodford here. more details on factory site Woodford 22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
As long as your basement is not freezing then you shouldn't have an issue. Get one with a longer reach, insulate and seal well at the rim joist/wall but leave the longer pipes exposed to the warmth. Real easy to tap into existing piping with PEX and SharkBite fittings. I usually install a ball valve right by it anyway so easy to totally shut off if I'm really concerned on cold days.

The outdoor frost free faucets NEED to be pitched so water drains out. Most have an angled shim or the assembly is angled already. User needs to make sure they disconnect the hose also after use so the vacuum breaker can do it's thing and water does not sit preventing draining. I stretch the hose out fully also to drain it then coil it back up but disconnected.

My friends uncle flooded his basement. He had a regular cold only 8" frost free but never unhooked the hose. The faucet was in a cold corner with a small draft and plumber had insulated the entire assembly preventing basement heat from reaching it.

Watch the video on the Woodford here. more details on factory site Woodford 22
Thanks so much for the information. My basement is finished and heated so no worries there. The issue is where the joist spaces are relative to the faucet coming out the outdoors. I really wanted it inside my garage so I can use it there. The plumbers here were not very enthusiastic about doing the job,...so I abandoned the project.
 

·
Registered
2019 Pilot EX-L AWD, 265-60-18 Defender LTX M/S
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
Thanks so much for the information. My basement is finished and heated so no worries there. The issue is where the joist spaces are relative to the faucet coming out the outdoors. I really wanted it inside my garage so I can use it there. The plumbers here were not very enthusiastic about doing the job,...so I abandoned the project.
The only issue I could see with the finished basement and spaces is what the ceiling is and how all is finished. If you are sealed up, sheet rocked ceiling/walls then there won't be much air (heat) getting to the space by joists to keep it warmer. I have a dropped tile ceiling in my basement that is not sealed up that well and just paneling on walls. Not insulated, not sealed, lots of air space to move. My basement is always warm as the boiler is down there.

Basement sealing/insulating gets into all sorts of scenarios. My friends house had a finished basement when he moved in. A couple years later an entre section of sheetrock ceiling fell down and there was mold everywhere. Contractor had used plastic sheet as barrier but that left perfect space behind for moisture through foundation to just stay there and spread.

New contractor after insurance mold cleanup sealed the walls and used rigid foam totally sealing them. Unfortunately they left a copper heating pipe for hot water baseboard on an outside joist by a crappy window. Yup that froze one night flooding a good part of the basement. After all the cleanup we ran a new PEX line one joist over and replumbed to baseboard. All has been well, fingers crossed.

Search Holmes on Homes basement insulation (Mike Holmes from Canada), for some ideas and proper ways.

Also why I like the longer pipes to get that source in where there is heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
The only issue I could see with the finished basement and spaces is what the ceiling is and how all is finished. If you are sealed up, sheet rocked ceiling/walls then there won't be much air (heat) getting to the space by joists to keep it warmer. I have a dropped tile ceiling in my basement that is not sealed up that well and just paneling on walls. Not insulated, not sealed, lots of air space to move. My basement is always warm as the boiler is down there.

Basement sealing/insulating gets into all sorts of scenarios. My friends house had a finished basement when he moved in. A couple years later an entre section of sheetrock ceiling fell down and there was mold everywhere. Contractor had used plastic sheet as barrier but that left perfect space behind for moisture through foundation to just stay there and spread.

New contractor after insurance mold cleanup sealed the walls and used rigid foam totally sealing them. Unfortunately they left a copper heating pipe for hot water baseboard on an outside joist by a crappy window. Yup that froze one night flooding a good part of the basement. After all the cleanup we ran a new PEX line one joist over and replumbed to baseboard. All has been well, fingers crossed.

Search Holmes on Homes basement insulation (Mike Holmes from Canada), for some ideas and proper ways.

Also why I like the longer pipes to get that source in where there is heat.
Thanks...my basement ceiling is a drop ceiling, and where the pipes go to the outdoors there is no ceiling.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top