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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, I enjoy trying to do very general maintenance on my own car. I have no formal experience/training whatsoever.
For the past 5 years since buying my pilot, I've done my own oil changes as well as those for the wife's CRV. Rotate the tires myself.......replaced one battery in CRV........guess thats it lol.

So, This coming Spring I believe my pads and rotors will need replacing. I've watched a lot of youtube videos on it and it really doesn't look that bad.. But I'm guessing there must be some things I should be prepared for? Any pitfalls I should be prepared for that are never shown in the youtube videos where everything goes perfectly?
Also, any specific recommendations for pads/rotors that won't necessarily break the bank but also work OK (and available in Canada!)?

Side note - with regards to rotating tires, for which I use the spare wheel to swap in and out as I move them around (I don't have a lift, just a jack).......anyone else find it a massive pain in the ass to remove, and put back, the spare tire?? It seems like where they put the hole with the square bolt thing, when you put the levers together to unscrew it, you can't move it all the way around because it hits the storage cover. So you have to do like half rotations over and over again. I must be missing something!!!! lol

Thx!!
 

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You’re correct,the pads and rotor replacement are fairy straight forward. Just a couple things:
1. The pads and rotors parts are up to you. I use either Autozone , Napa or Advance Auto parts. These pads have a lifetime warranty. Some prefer OEM parts. If the sight of rust on the new rotor hubs is going to bother you, go with the rotors that have the protective coating or are painted. Advance Auto has a nice product or go OEM.
2. If you want to save yourself a lot of time and avoid the issue of drilling out the set screws on each of rotors, don’t use a regular phillips screw driver. Buy the correct tool. Here is the correct tool to use: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003BGTTSE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
3. The You Tube videoclips you’re watch is a smart move and very helpful.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! Yup, have the impact screw driver, brake caliper spreader, brake pad lube, grease if needed for sliders, and some bungee cords to hang the caliper from. Bought some of this stuff a few months ago as I thought I would be doing it in the fall, but everything was still working fine so decided to wait.
Cheers
 

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Side note - with regards to rotating tires, for which I use the spare wheel to swap in and out as I move them around (I don't have a lift, just a jack).......anyone else find it a massive pain in the ass to remove, and put back, the spare tire?? It seems like where they put the hole with the square bolt thing, when you put the levers together to unscrew it, you can't move it all the way around because it hits the storage cover. So you have to do like half rotations over and over again. I must be missing something!!!! lol

Thx!!
Depending on how much mechanic work your willing to do in the future, I'd buy a 3-ton low profile floor jack and at least two 3-ton jack stands. This will eliminate the need to use your spare tire. 3 ton Jack may be overkill for Honda's but I find that bigger is better with jacks. Low profile Jack can get under small cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Depending on how much mechanic work your willing to do in the future, I'd buy a 3-ton low profile floor jack and at least two 3-ton jack stands. This will eliminate the need to use your spare tire. 3 ton Jack may be overkill for Honda's but I find that bigger is better with jacks. Low profile Jack can get under small cars.

I do have a 3 ton jack and a couple jack stands. :) But I can still only prop up one corner at a time, no?? My procedure is something like:
  • lift one corner, remove wheel, put spare on, lower back down.
  • lift next corner, remove wheel, put wheel on from other corner, lower down
  • lift another corner, remove wheel, place wheel from last corner, lower down
  • lift corner with spare, place last wheel there, lower down. Put spare back.
Again, I'm a total rookie at all this, so maybe I am doing it wrong lol.
 

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I do have a 3 ton jack and a couple jack stands. :) But I can still only prop up one corner at a time, no?? My procedure is something like:
  • lift one corner, remove wheel, put spare on, lower back down.
  • lift next corner, remove wheel, put wheel on from other corner, lower down
  • lift another corner, remove wheel, place wheel from last corner, lower down
  • lift corner with spare, place last wheel there, lower down. Put spare back.
Again, I'm a total rookie at all this, so maybe I am doing it wrong lol.
A jack stand will solve this or buy a 2nd floor jack. Jack stands are used for safety reasons if your under your car. There are videos on the proper use of these. (Chalk tires, apply emergency brake, solid level ground, placement, etc).
ADDED: You can lift vehicle by placing jack further under car. See videos for other places that are ok to place floor Jack. That will free up the Jack point for a Jack stand
133967
 

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You want to chock (not chalk?) the appropriate before jacking the vehicle.

The first gen Pilots have a front and rear jack point which don’t interfere with the four reinforced points where you can set the jackstands. I’m not sure if the second gen pilots have this same configuration, so you might check the owners manual.

If you get four jackstands then you’d be able to have all four corners off the ground at the same time. That could save you time during tire rotations.

For the brake job, work on one side at a time so you have the other side to use as a reference.

And if you don’t have a torque wrench I would invest in one so you properly tighten the bolts. You will also need to obtain the torque spec for all the bolts you are installing.
 

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You can raise the whole front or rear of the car by placing the jack under the shipping tie-down points. A the front this is a bracket that pokes down through the plastic pan close to midway left-to-right and maybe six inches back from the forward edge of the pan. In the rear, the tie-down point is in the middle of the cross-member just forward (towards the front of the car...) from the spare tire. I add one or two blocks of wood on the jack saddle to limit damage to the car and the jack. Anyway, on relatively level ground you can lift the front with trans in 'park' and parking brake set, then place stands under the two front lift points under the rocker sills. Move to the rear and do the same, with two more stands under the rear two lift points. With the tires just an inch or two ff the floor, they are pretty easy to get on and off the wheel studs, plus everything will be at a nice working height. Adequate jackstands are not at all expensive. The local Harbor Freight store regularly has a pair for $25. 3 Ton Steel Jack Stands Canadian Tire and Princess Auto stores offer the same or similar product for our northern neighbors.

Other tips:
-- Slightly loosen the wheel nuts before lifting the car.
-- Be sure to release the parking brake once the car is safely on the stands. You won't be able to remove he rear rotors with the parking brake engaged.
-- Use utility wire to support (hang) the calipers while they are unbolted from the carrier. Don't let them hang from the hoses.
--Take the opportunity to replace the brake fluid if it's been two or more years since it was last changed. Relatively convenient while you have everything easily accessible and your hands are already dirty and tools are out. Plenty of guidance on doing that with some searching here.
 

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You can raise the whole front or rear of the car by placing the jack under the shipping tie-down points. A the front this is a bracket that pokes down through the plastic pan close to midway left-to-right and maybe six inches back from the forward edge of the pan. In the rear, the tie-down point is in the middle of the cross-member just forward (towards the front of the car...) from the spare tire. I add one or two blocks of wood on the jack saddle to limit damage to the car and the jack. Anyway, on relatively level ground you can lift the front with trans in 'park' and parking brake set, then place stands under the two front lift points under the rocker sills. Move to the rear and do the same, with two more stands under the rear two lift points. With the tires just an inch or two ff the floor, they are pretty easy to get on and off the wheel studs, plus everything will be at a nice working height. Adequate jackstands are not at all expensive. The local Harbor Freight store regularly has a pair for $25. 3 Ton Steel Jack Stands Canadian Tire and Princess Auto stores offer the same or similar product for our northern neighbors.

Other tips:
-- Slightly loosen the wheel nuts before lifting the car.
-- Be sure to release the parking brake once the car is safely on the stands. You won't be able to remove he rear rotors with the parking brake engaged.
-- Use utility wire to support (hang) the calipers while they are unbolted from the carrier. Don't let them hang from the hoses.
--Take the opportunity to replace the brake fluid if it's been two or more years since it was last changed. Relatively convenient while you have everything easily accessible and your hands are already dirty and tools are out. Plenty of guidance on doing that with some searching here.
I have the dealer do an on car machining of the rotors(only way to do it) and Honda pads installed. I get about 50K out of the brakes. I tried Bosch Quietcast rotors which were fine until the pads they sold me chewed up the rotors in no time. Back with stock Honda pads which are a bit soft to preserve the rotors. They charge me about $250. The hybrid CRV might be next. 38/41 mpg sounds a lot better than 17 mpg. More road noise isolation too. Our Pilots are not known for quiet on the freeway.
 

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Hey all, I enjoy trying to do very general maintenance on my own car. I have no formal experience/training whatsoever.
For the past 5 years since buying my pilot, I've done my own oil changes as well as those for the wife's CRV. Rotate the tires myself.......replaced one battery in CRV........guess thats it lol.

So, This coming Spring I believe my pads and rotors will need replacing. I've watched a lot of youtube videos on it and it really doesn't look that bad.. But I'm guessing there must be some things I should be prepared for? Any pitfalls I should be prepared for that are never shown in the youtube videos where everything goes perfectly?
Also, any specific recommendations for pads/rotors that won't necessarily break the bank but also work OK (and available in Canada!)?

Side note - with regards to rotating tires, for which I use the spare wheel to swap in and out as I move them around (I don't have a lift, just a jack).......anyone else find it a massive pain in the ass to remove, and put back, the spare tire?? It seems like where they put the hole with the square bolt thing, when you put the levers together to unscrew it, you can't move it all the way around because it hits the storage cover. So you have to do like half rotations over and over again. I must be missing something!!!! lol

Thx!!
You can raise the whole front or rear of the car by placing the jack under the shipping tie-down points. A the front this is a bracket that pokes down through the plastic pan close to midway left-to-right and maybe six inches back from the forward edge of the pan. In the rear, the tie-down point is in the middle of the cross-member just forward (towards the front of the car...) from the spare tire. I add one or two blocks of wood on the jack saddle to limit damage to the car and the jack. Anyway, on relatively level ground you can lift the front with trans in 'park' and parking brake set, then place stands under the two front lift points under the rocker sills. Move to the rear and do the same, with two more stands under the rear two lift points. With the tires just an inch or two ff the floor, they are pretty easy to get on and off the wheel studs, plus everything will be at a nice working height. Adequate jackstands are not at all expensive. The local Harbor Freight store regularly has a pair for $25. 3 Ton Steel Jack Stands Canadian Tire and Princess Auto stores offer the same or similar product for our northern neighbors.

Other tips:
-- Slightly loosen the wheel nuts before lifting the car.
-- Be sure to release the parking brake once the car is safely on the stands. You won't be able to remove he rear rotors with the parking brake engaged.
-- Use utility wire to support (hang) the calipers while they are unbolted from the carrier. Don't let them hang from the hoses.
--Take the opportunity to replace the brake fluid if it's been two or more years since it was last changed. Relatively convenient while you have everything easily accessible and your hands are already dirty and tools are out. Plenty of guidance on doing that with some searching here.
I agree with the above except changing the brake oil. You just add new brake oil after the new rotors and pads are in and bleed the lines. If you do your own maintenance then definitely go to Harbor Freight and buy their best rolling jack. The cheap one is dangerous and their cast iron jack stands from China have hollow spots inside. One broke on me so I threw them all out and purchased steel ones, not cast iron. Regarding the removing the spare tire the best way is to use a 3/4" ratchet drive instead of the Honda Tool. Tip: I lowered and unhooked the spare tire to make sure I could, and to change the oil in the rear differential. Then I cleaned and primed all the metal under the car that traps road salt from the tire. Spray painted everything in the rear quarter to prevent rust and holes forming in the trunk. Sprayed the cable with WD40 and cleaned and painted the spare tire rim so rust doesn't lead to a leak and bad spare tire. "Preventive Action is so much cheaper than Corrective Action".
 

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grease if needed for sliders
This is not an if but a must. One of the more common mistakes I've seen from friends and family doing their own brakes was not cleaning and lubricating the slide pins and the caliper stopped moving properly.
 
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I agree with the above except changing the brake oil. You just add new brake oil after the new rotors and pads are in and bleed the lines. ...
I'll strongly disagree. Brake fluid has a useful service life of one to two years, depending on climate. The fluid is hygroscopic, so gathers moisture from the air. That leads to lower boiling point of the fluid, and eventually causes corrosion in the steel hydraulic pieces. Do yourself the favor and push new fluid through the system, easy while the wheels are off.

... Regarding the removing the spare tire the best way is to use a 3/4" ratchet drive instead of the Honda Tool. ...
A foot-long 3/8"-drive extension plus maybe another six- to eight-inch extension to get out past the bumper will index in the spare tire winch and allow you to use a handy ratchet or speed handle to make things move faster. Guessing that was a mis-type in your post.
 

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One newbie tip. When doing rear brakes (and only if you plan on installing new rotors), do NOT engage the e-brake. Make sure you chock the front wheels, release the e-brake, then lift the car, otherwise you will not be able to remove the rotors.
 

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For me, things were made a lot easier by this tool:

In particular the 19mm side for loosening the caliper frame bolts. Those kinda tend to seize so you need a fair bit of leverage in a very tight space. Front wheels can be turned for easier access, but on rears, it can be a real doozy.
 

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If you have no idea It's best to have someone physically teach you how to do brakes the first time. This is one of those maintenance Items if done wrong will CAUSE Death or Injury.
 

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Hey all, I enjoy trying to do very general maintenance on my own car. I have no formal experience/training whatsoever.
For the past 5 years since buying my pilot, I've done my own oil changes as well as those for the wife's CRV. Rotate the tires myself.......replaced one battery in CRV........guess thats it lol.

So, This coming Spring I believe my pads and rotors will need replacing. I've watched a lot of youtube videos on it and it really doesn't look that bad.. But I'm guessing there must be some things I should be prepared for? Any pitfalls I should be prepared for that are never shown in the youtube videos where everything goes perfectly?
Also, any specific recommendations for pads/rotors that won't necessarily break the bank but also work OK (and available in Canada!)?

Side note - with regards to rotating tires, for which I use the spare wheel to swap in and out as I move them around (I don't have a lift, just a jack).......anyone else find it a massive pain in the ass to remove, and put back, the spare tire?? It seems like where they put the hole with the square bolt thing, when you put the levers together to unscrew it, you can't move it all the way around because it hits the storage cover. So you have to do like half rotations over and over again. I must be missing something!!!! lol

Thx!!
Your biggest challenges will be the roti retaining screw. Sounds like you have the impact driver. My advice is buy 4 stainless replacement screws.

Your next challenge will be to get the caliper abutments clean. If you live in a salt state, getting a high quality abutment file will make this easy. Get high quality caliper grease. I like the purple stuff.
 

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When I changed my front pads and rotors the screws came out relatively easy. I didn't put them back in because they are unnecessary. Now I don't have to worry about it anymore.
 
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